I like big guns and I cannot lie…

mail.google.com

 By  Cat Lindsay

I like big guns and I cannot lie…

 

This could be the song of my ladies!

At the last Ladies Introduction to Shooting class, while I only had one student, it was one of my best classes ever!

C, a 5’/100lb. 30-something spa owner, came to my class because her business has had 5 break-ins or attempted break-ins over the past 2 years. She no longer feels safe. While she does buzz her clients in and out, she fears someone barging in past one her customers. She was ready to learn the basics of handguns.

Though she had shot a gun once, in her youth, she came to me on Saturday as a clean slate. I actually prefer newbies, because there are no bad habits to break.

When we first started out, we used the replica training guns, as usual.  But, she soon wanted to touch & feel the real thing. For demo purposes, I always use my .45 Ruger SR1911, my 9mm S & W M & P Shield, my Taurus 608 .357 magnum, and one of MAGS rental guns, usually a large-frame 9mm Glock. This gives my students a wide variety of guns to feel.

With small hands, the double-stack Glock was too big.  She liked the feel of the Shield, but liked the weight of the Ruger & Taurus, because they “feel like real guns”.

After the classroom time (safety, how the guns & ammo work, loading magazines, clearing malfunctions, grip, stance, sights), we headed to the range.

The first gun she fired was the Taurus, shooting .38’s.  She liked the weight and being able to control such power. The Shield fit her hand better, but she didn’t like the recoil. She really liked the Ruger, the weight and all the safeties. She fired Will’s (MAGS employee) Gen 4 Glock 19, but had malfunctions. I showed her the difference between locking out and REALLY locking out, and she had better results. The last gun she fired was a Ruger SR .22 (I know we should have started with this gun, but it was a rental and we had to wait). She did not care for the optics.

So at the conclusion of the class, I asked her what her favorite gun was and she said the Taurus revolver and the Ruger 1911 because they felt like real guns. I told her that bigger, heavier guns were great for home/business defense.

BTW, she will be taking the CCW class in later this month!

Federal Fusion Ammo Testing

Fusion
By Andrew Betts

Federal’s Fusion line may very well be the best kept secret in defensive rifle ammunition. It is a bonded soft point (okay, technically it is plated but the result is essentially the same) that bears a strong similarity to the Gold Dot line from Speer. That might seem odd at first glance, but both companies are owned by ATK. The Fusion line appears to be aimed at the hunting market based on the design of the packaging and promotional materials and indeed, it looks as though it would make an excellent load for deer and similar sized animals. It is gaining popularity as a home defense and emergency preparedness load though, and for good reason.

The .223 Rem version of Fusion comes in two flavors: original and MSR. The MSR version features annealed cases, sealed primers, and a slightly higher muzzle velocity out of most rifles but but both use the same bullet. Because this ammunition might be used in a wide variety of situations, we wanted to see how it could perform at the edges of its design limits. To do that, we tested the projectiles with two different hand loads designed for higher than factory velocity and very low velocity and we fired them from 16” and 11.5” barrels.

https://youtu.be/otou1Fws4cQ

The results were nothing short of phenomenal. The higher velocity bullet impacted at well over 3,000 fps and produced excellent expansion, fragmentation, and ideal penetration. As expected, the lower velocity projectile retained more weight and penetrated more deeply. What was really remarkable was that this load, which approximates the impact velocity of the full power load at 475 yards, was still able to produce substantial expansion and it did so almost immediately on impact, with a neck length of about half an inch. This performance is truly incredible for such a low velocity.

There is already a wide array of quality defensive choices for ammunition in .223 Rem and 5.56x45mm but until fairly recently, there were not many well designed defense loads for the 7.62x39mm. Recently, that has begun to change and it was a pleasant surprise to see Federal offer a Fusion load in 7.62x39mm. This is a very capable cartridge for hunting and defense, with a lot to offer and it really shines with the benefit of modern technology.

https://youtu.be/xEo6avZd9ys

Just as with the .223 load, the 7.62x39mm began to expand almost instantly on impact. It penetrated to 15” which is absolutely ideal for defensive use. It also produced huge expansion and a devastating wound channel. It is rarely wise to proclaim one particularly load to be “best” but if terminal performance is the priority, there exists no better ammunition in 7.62x39mm for defense.There may be better choices for other applications, but for defense against human beings, this is the best load available. That it is also more affordable than other premium ammo is a bonus.

Soft points in general and bonded soft points in particular tend to be very good at barrier performance. To be clear, just about any bullet can pass through a windshield, car door, wooden board, or piece of gypsum. Some bullets may not be able to expand and/or fragment as designed if they strike tissue after passing through the obstacle, though. The ability to perform nearly as well after passing through a barrier is referred to as “barrier blind”. It is an important feature to many shooters since bad guys have this funny quirk where they don’t like being shot and tend to get behind stuff. Auto glass is one of the toughest materials on a bullet because glass is much harder than wood or metal so we fired both the .223 Rem and the 7.62x39mm Fusion through a windshield to test its barrier performance.

https://youtu.be/upyDQyr-3Lk

Penetration was reduced a bit, which is to be expected, but the bullets still expanded as designed. It is not really a quantifiable measure, but the high speed video really gives an impressive illustration of just how incredible both these rifle rounds are. Both performed as well as anyone could reasonably ask in some very difficult circumstances. Whether close or long range, whether with a carbine or SBR, and even if one has to shoot through intermediate obstacles, the Federal Fusion will get the job done. What is more impressive is that it is not marketed as go fast, door kicking ninja ammo. It is just quality ammunition at a decent price.

A rare failure, the broken AR15 forward assist.

Broken AR15 Forward Assist

Pictured above is the broken forward assist from my Colt 6933.

I’ve see a few forward assists break. Every time it has come as a surprise to the shooter. Usually what happens is a shot is fired, and the action ends up locked closed, and no one is able to open it using normal clearing techniques. In my case the action locked open after ejecting a shell.

It can be hard to diagnose a jam caused by a broken extractor simply because you can’t see that is what is preventing the bolt carrier from moving.

The best procedure we have found to free up a stuck bolt carrier from a broken forward assist is to:
1. Remove magazine, keep muzzle pointed in a safe direction.
2. Hold rifle with the ejection port down, barrel parallel to the ground.
3. Shake rifle while attempting to move bolt carrier.

Then usually it wont take much to get the action moving again. Immediately clear the chamber and remove the bolt carrier group from the action and remove any loose parts(like the forward assist pawl shown above).

Over the years, I have come to believe that the forward assist should be reserved for emergencies. In practice or on the range if a round does not chamber discard the round or inspect the firearm. I have met many(most former Army) that hit the forward assist after every reload. If your rifle isn’t chambering the round under its own power, there is something wrong with either the rifle or the ammo. Forward assists very rarely fail, but there is no point in slapping it around unless it is an emergency.

Designated Marskman Instructor Comments on the AR15 at 1,000 yard Article

This is from the comment section from the article about shooting the AR15 at 1,000 yards. The commenter offered some insight into the Army’s marksmanship levels and attitude.  I have offered the commenter a chance to elaborate and post more on the subject.  hopefully this will be expanded and he will come back to share his thoughts and experience in greater detail in more posts.   Below is the original post from Jose

Original post Jose was speaking about here

http://looserounds.com/2013/06/10/ar15-at-1000-yards-can-a-rack-grade-ar15-and-m855-make-1000-yard-hits/

Good on you Shawn. I’ve coached the last three consecutive All Army Small Arms champions. Before that I taught SDM for s number of years, still conduct the occasional course.
I’m not a distinguished rifleman (yet) but I’ve produced a number of them.
The M16A4 and M4 are woefully misunderstood by nearly all Soldiers. There are less than 200 Soldiers in the Army that I would consider “Riflemen” even the “multiple tours, combat arms NCO” is not a guarantee of any real skill at arms AT ALL. Soldiers are universally poorly skilled with their rifles. It’s appalling. But for such Soldiers, first you’d have to admit you have a problem. If they “qualify expert” they believe *that* somehow equals skill. I’d call that “familiarity.” 40/40 is easy, nothing to brag about, and is a ridiculously low standard. Most Soldiers never achieve even that embarrassingly low standard. If an NCO can’t get all of his squad to shoot “expert” he’s untrained.
My point is that most (but I’d wager closer to all) the criticism you may have received from Soldiers ought to be dismissed out of hand. They really are overconfident amateurs. Even in “Special Forces” units, that’s no guarantee of skill at arms.
That about sums it up. If I offended someone, good. Outshoot me.
The thing is that the M16/M4 is an EXCELLENT weapon and there are excellent 5.56mm cartridges. A Soldier doesn’t have to be a superhero to shoot really well with it either. We trained many female Soldiers that had no problem striking a steel silhouette target, 14″ wide and 40″ tall, at 760 meters, with iron sights on her M16A2. I can drop names, ranks, class dates. With the M4 and ACOG, SDM Students routinely hit the same target at 800 to 830 meters – 1st round hits.
In our SDM classes, we spent so much time at 500 and 600 on the KD range, that 300 was a welcomed and easy target engagement for them. Yet in units many Soldiers will not engage the 3 exposures of the 300 meter target, preferring to save those three rounds for the closer targets when they miss the first shot, so they can re-engage the ‘easy’ targets. They’re all easy!
I want to share a couple of things, there’s somebody out there reading this that will heed this advice, I promise it can make you a dramatically better shooter.
When shooting for precision with rack grade Army M16’s or M4’s there is one method that works. DO NOT EVER USE A SLING OF ANY KIND TO “LOCK IN” “SNAP IN” OR OTHERWISE PULL ON THE SLING SWIVEL. The AR in a rack grade condition does not have a free floating barrel. The upper receiver is made of a zinc and aluminium alloy, the barrel is hard steel. Pulling on the sling is like making a giant torque wrench, moving the strike if the round several inches just at 100 yards! Any weight or pressure on the handguards moves the barrel.
Don’t touch the handguards or use a sling if you want the most out of a rack grade rifle.
Use the magazine, preferably a 30 rounder, as a monpod. Place the palm of your non firing hand (not your fingers) on the flat front face of the magwell. Spread your elbows and get nice and low and stable. The non firing palm exerts firm rearward pressure on the rifle.
There’s more to it, but that’s the biggest challenge you’re having now. Great job on the test
Enjoy.

All about those sights…

mail.google.com

By Cat Lindsay



At the last 2-hour weekly training class (MAGS Indoor Shooting Range), it was all about the sights.

I know there are alot of “point” shooters out there, which is fine shooting from retention from 0-5 yards, but if my arm is in lock-out, my eyes are looking for the sights!

After warm up drills (2 to the body, 1 to the head, then the two combined{failure drill}), we shot drills first with the strong hand, then switched to the off hand, making sure to keep the sights in focus during the transition (harder than you think!). Some shots we did on the same spot, some were from right to left, while some were from lower corner to upper corner. We did these drills from 3-10 yards away from the targets.

With shooting one-handed, the stance, grip, and lock-out stays the same as with shooting with both hands. There is a tendency to want to be too perfect with the shot, which leads to muscle fatigue, then slapping the trigger. As soon as any part of the front sight can be seen through the rear sight, on the target, the trigger needs to be released.

I occasionally turned on the safety while transitioning from right hand to left hand, so lost some time on some of the drills. If I ran empty, I reloaded one handed (release magazine, pinch gun between knees, reload, rack slide on belt). At the end of the night, we went back to both hands and it was so much easier!

Speaking of sights, I have been really liking the Trijicon HD Night Sights Mike installed 3 weeks ago. I love the big orange photoluminescent front dot and the “U” shaped back sight cutout. I find that I can pick up my sights quicker with the contrast. I did the one-handed drills with my Crimson Trace laser turned off and felt I didn’t lose much speed. The flat-fronted rear sight made racking the slide much easier, one-handed, as opposed to the slope-front one I had previously. The glow at night on my headboard is also very comforting. These night sights are well worth the cost.

So, the next time you’re on the range, take some time to work on sighted, one-hand drills. You never know when knowing this skill may come in handy for personal protection.

1911 Squib Round with Cheap Ammunition

This happen recently at a gun range that I use frequently. The range officer gave me permission to share the photos.  This happened with a new shooter and his new, very expensive custom 1911. The shooter was using Parabellum Research (PBR) ammunition when he had a squib round and fired the next round into the squib. Luckily the frame and slide held up well and did not appear to be damaged. Only the barrel had been damaged. The manufacturer of the ammunition is taking care of the firearm owner. The range advised it has been having problems with this particular ammunition manufacturer.

It is important as a shooter to quickly identify when you have had a squib round, to avoid firing then next round into it and blowing your barrel and firearm up. If you have the money to buy a custom built very expensive firearm, (no matter what it is), don’t shoot low quality / cheap ammunition through it to save a few cents. You had the money to buy the firearm so don’t get cheap on the ammo. While this can happen with any ammunition, if you buy known quality factory or premium factor ammunition, this will lessen the chances of having a squib or catastrophic failure.

Duncan.

082

084

086

Step Outside Your Comfort Zone

By Cat Lindsay

Last Saturday at MAGS Indoor Shooting, we did CCW 2-year renewals and 4-year requals. For some people, this is the ONLY time they shoot a gun, which is both scary (would you REALLY know what to do in a life or death situation?) and sad (training is fun!).

A guy asked to borrow my Ruger SR1911. I asked him if he familiar this style of weapon and he said “Yes, I shot one 2 years ago when I got my license (he carries a .38 revolver). He loaded the bullets in the magazine backward (which I fixed), but he did qualify, and I scored half a box of ammo!

One lady, T, who was there for her 4-year renewal, initially got her license because, as a real estate agent, she did not feel safe showing property in her rural area. She carries a .380 semi-auto in a purse (future article), but chose to qualify with a .45 semi-auto and a .45 revolver. We find that a lot of students will do this, since it means purchasing only one box of ammo(25 rounds to qualify).

T initially qualified with a .45 semi-auto and a .38 revolver. With a renewal, one has the opportuniy to qualify with whatever gun they wish (unlike the 2-year), so she was talked into trying the .45 Taurus Judge. She was quite intimidated with the size and weight (as compared to her .380), but was willing to give it a try.

After showing her the proper grip, finding the sights, and how to cock the hammer, she dry fired a few times. Before firing live rounds, I showed her the proper stance. Her first shot was in the head(shots are to be placed below the head on a “Q” target). While she was surprised at the noise, she stated that the recoil was very controllable. While she did miss her 5th round (she admitted she was not watching her sights), the rest of the 20 rounds went in the center. Afterwards, she had a huge grin on her face, feeling very confident in her ability to control any gun she wishes to shoot.

T also qualified with a Sig Sauer .45 semi-auto. She did say she found it much easier to shoot after having learned the proper grip and stance.

Though T may never shoot or carry a .45 revolver, she now knows that there is not limit to what she can learn and how far she can go in her Warrior Womandom!

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