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8 thoughts on “Not a fun project”

  1. Howard, if you’re taking requests, I’d love to get some info on 3D printing magazines. It seems like the state-of-the-art on 3D printed receivers is kinda toy-like, but it seems like 3D printed mags could be worthwhile for training, if nothing else.

    Anyway, kudos on getting the receiver all together.

    Reply
    • Many of the 3D printed AR15 receivers are reinforced near the take down pin locations preventing the use of standard pivot and take down pins. While it would be simple enough to print a lower that used standard pins, it would be substantially weaker.

      Reply
      • Thanks for the reply,guess bolts the way to go then,any way to use a pin/clevis combo perhaps for quicker cleaning,just brain storming as I am getting interested in this “project”,thanks for reviews/info.

        Reply
    • I’ve worked with some printed prototypes where the printer guy hands you the as-printed part and says, “Good luck.” Lots of support material removal, cleaning up flashing, fragile details that can be removed as easily as flashing if you’re not careful, etc. Also, tolerance issues resulting from the precision the machine is capable of based on positional accuracy and bead diameter. Sometimes that stuff is magic…a couple times, I might have been better off having a machinist cut the part from aluminum.

      Reply
    • Like Rocketguy said post processing was a pain. I spent something like 8 hours from taking the print off the printer to having it assembled like the picture above.
      Little details I haven’t talked about like having to go drill every hole out to the correct size and depth (except for the trigger pin holes which turned out perfect). The grip screw hole just tearing apart when I tried to tap it. Support material not breaking loose from the threads that the receiver extension goes into, so they had to be sanded/melted out, and fixed. Etc.
      I feel like I could have made a functional lower from a block of aluminum on a Bridgeport faster, provided I had the tooling I needed.

      Reply

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