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Glock 44 Problems

Some rumblings going around that the new .22 LR Glock 44 isn’t doing too well.

And here is another one that had an oopsie.

Another.

And Another..

And another..

I think I would wait a while before I bought one of these if you are thinking about it. And if you do get one, have good eye pro.

“LEGENDARY”

22 thoughts on “Glock 44 Problems”

  1. I’m surprised they’re having such trouble with a .22 of all things. Usually the problem is cycling or feeding not self destruction. What did they use pot metal?

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  2. Gonna go out on a limb and suggest that those slides are MIM, not machined steel.

    Glock has had its issues, over the years. I’m sure they screwed up something with this, and I’m equally sure they’ll fix it, eventually.

    People don’t think that large-scale manufacture of firearms be like it is, but they do. Or, something… Basic point to be made is that any product that you’re building is going to have issues that “shouldn’t happen”, but which always do.

    Personally, I’m rather fond of the idea of conversion kits, and the ones I’ve fired before were just fine. I don’t see the point to a dedicated .22 that replicates a service pistol for training purposes–Just slap a kit on the frame you use every day, and that’s good enough for me. There are plenty of Glock aftermarket conversion kits, and the one for the CZ-75 is really good.

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  3. I never considered a .22 pistol, and Glock is way overpriced for what they are. If ever a .22 pistol I would go with the Taurus TX22 with the threaded barrel. MSRP $349, Street price as low as $239.

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  4. The Glock 44 is in 22. The Glock 22 is in 40. The Glock 40 is in 10 like the 20. There is no Glock 10, but there is a Glock in 9 aka the 17 and 19 and 26 and 43, not including the 48 – which came out before the 44 – and the 43X, which are the same except for the ways in which they’re different. Actually they’re like the 45, which is a 9, which is the same as a 19x which is actually more like the 17 than the 19. Strangely enough the 45 came before the 44, but 45 came before 9, but not 44, so maybe that’s the logic. If you wanted a 45, you need a 36, a 41, a 30, a 21, or a 21SF, or a 30S, or a 30SF. Of course if you want Glock’s 45 you need a 37, 38 or 39. The 38 isn’t a 38, there are other 38’s. If you want a Glock, definitely get the 19 and maybe a 22 to practice with – not the 40 22, but the 44 22. The 22 won’t help you to practice with your 9 as much as a 23, which is closer to the 19. Unless your goal is competition, in which case you should have been considering a 35 or 17L or 24 or 41 or 34 which are 40 9 40 45 9 respectively. The 31 32 and 33 are actually 357’s but not the 38 357’s. They’re 357’s that are more like 9s but not like the 380 is like 9’s. If you wanted that you need a 42. And nobody likes a 42, you’re better off with a 9. And therefore try a 44 because everyone loves to work on their 9 with a 22.

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  5. Look, everybody has a hard job, but how do you screw up a .22? Especially one that seemingly has this little engineering to it?

    Kel-Tec is doing very cool stuff with rimfire magazines. Ruger just built an LCP in .22. If those malfunction, fine. But there have been approximately one zillion Glock .22 conversion units over the years. How do they screw this up?

    Has anyone checked Gaston for a pulse in the last couple of years?

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  6. I’ve almost spent as much money as I paid for the gun, still getting fte stovepipe and whatever else, called glock they say use only 40gr bullets, been there done that, no good!

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  7. No issues. Put over 500 rounds thru so far and eats 22lr like candy. Maybe you all need to do some forearm work so you don’t limp a 22lr…? Lol

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  8. I’ve shot about 1500 rounds of thunderbolt through my Glock 44 so far. The first range day I had some stovepipes, I’m not sure if it was because it was 20F out or because it was new. After that, I cleaned it thoroughly and have had zero issues; it now cycles flawlessly. I expect to shoot it until it stops working, but am hoping that will be more than 30k rounds – we will see.

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  9. I just had a G44 blow on me at the range yesterday. Same basic issue as the other photos I have seen on the internet. The pistol either shot out of battery or cooked off a round. The ball is still stuck in the barrel.
    It fired 4 rounds before the event, which caused hot gas and particles to blow back in my face and shooting arm.
    Back home, I stripped the piece. The chamber entry was damaged. I could not put a round into it. I found a hairline crack along the left side of the slide, similar to other photos I have seen. The extractor and rod were still in place, however.
    I contacted the Glock Legal Department today and will go from there. If this website owner contacts me, I will send photos. I took about 50 hi-res shots.
    After 40-plus years in the military and LE, my personal opinion is there is a manufacturing issue with the composite slide. I am not confident in a replacement 44. I have asked Glock for a refund.
    BTW, I have carried G19s and G22s professionally, and have never had any issues with them. Overall, I am still fond of Glocks, but IMHO they screwed the pooch with this one.

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