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More Gun Bills Introduced in VA 1/6/2020


HB 567 Indoor shooting ranges; prohibited in buildings not owned or leased by the Commonwealth.

Indoor shooting ranges; prohibited in buildings not owned or leased by the Commonwealth or federal government; exceptions; civil penalty. Prohibits the operation of an indoor shooting range, defined in the bill, in any building not owned or leased by the Commonwealth or federal government unless (i) fewer than 50 employees work in the building or (ii) (a) at least 90 percent of the users of the indoor shooting range are law-enforcement officers or federal law-enforcement officers, (b) the indoor shooting range maintains a log of each user’s name, phone number, address, and the law-enforcement agency where such user is employed, and (c) the indoor shooting range verifies each user’s identity and address by requiring all users to present a government-issued photo-identification card. The bill provides that any person that violates the provisions of this section is subject to a civil penalty of not less than $1,000 nor more than $100,000 for the initial violation and $5,000 per day for each day of violation thereafter.

HB 568 Carrying or storing firearms in motor vehicles and vessels; exceptions; penalty.

Carrying or storing firearms in motor vehicles and vessels; exceptions; penalty. Provides that any person possessing or storing a firearm in a motor vehicle or vessel shall secure such firearm in a locked container, other than a glove box, that is not within the dominion and control of or readily accessible for prompt and immediate use by any person within the motor vehicle. The bill provides exceptions for law-enforcement officers, licensed security guards, military personnel in the performance of their lawful duties, or any person having a valid concealed handgun permit. A violation is punishable by a civil penalty not to exceed $2,500. The bill also removes the current exception for carrying a concealed weapon for any person who may lawfully possess a firearm and is carrying a handgun while in a personal, private motor vehicle or vessel and such handgun is secured in a container or compartment in the vehicle or vessel.

HB 569 Out-of-state concealed handgun permits; reciprocity.

Out-of-state concealed handgun permits; reciprocity. Reinstates the prior law providing that the holder of an out-of-state concealed handgun permit who is at least 21 years of age is authorized to carry a concealed handgun in Virginia if the other state (i) has a 24-hour-a-day means of verification of the validity of the permits issued in that state and (ii) has requirements and qualifications that are adequate to prevent possession of a permit by persons who would be denied a permit in Virginia. Under current law, the holder of an out-of-state concealed handgun permit who is at least 21 years of age is authorized to carry a concealed handgun in Virginia if (a) the other state has a means of verification of the validity of the permits issued in that state, accessible 24 hours a day, if available; (b) the person carries a government-issued photo identification and displays it upon demand of a law-enforcement officer; and (c) the person has not previously had a Virginia concealed handgun permit revoked. The bill states that the Attorney General shall (1) determine whether states meet the requirements and qualifications of the bill, (2) maintain a registry of such states, and (3) make the registry available to law-enforcement officers for investigative purposes. The bill further requires the Attorney General to review the determinations of whether states meet the requirements and qualifications of the bill and update the registry accordingly every two years. The bill removes the requirement for the Superintendent of State Police to enter into agreements for reciprocal recognition with other states that require an agreement to be in place before the state will recognize a Virginia concealed handgun permit as valid in the state and provides that the Attorney General may enter into agreements for reciprocal recognition with any state qualifying for recognition. The bill also reinstates the recognition of certain Maryland concealed handgun permits and eliminates the requirement that the Superintendent of State Police enter into agreements for reciprocal recognition of concealed handgun permits or licenses with other states where agreements were in existence on December 1, 2015.

ETA: New / just released:

HB 599 Carrying weapon into building owned or leased by the Commonwealth; penalty.

Carrying weapon into building owned or leased by the Commonwealth; penalty. Makes it a Class 3 misdemeanor for a person to transport any (i) gun or other weapon designed or intended to propel a missile or projectile of any kind; (ii) frame, receiver, muffler, silencer, missile, projectile, or ammunition designed for use with a dangerous weapon; or (iii) other dangerous weapon into a building owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof, where employees of the Commonwealth or agency thereof are regularly present for the purpose of performing their official duties. A third or subsequent violation is punishable as a misdemeanor, and such offender may be confined in jail not more than 30 days and fined not more than $500, either or both. The bill provides exceptions for law-enforcement officers, conservators of the peace, magistrates, court officers, judges, city or county treasurers, commissioners or deputy commissioners of the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission, authorized security personnel, and active military personnel while in the conduct of such individuals’ official duties. The bill requires that notice of the provisions prohibiting the carrying of such weapons be posted at each public entrance to all buildings owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof.


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