FBI Selects Aimpoint T2/H2 for HRT & DSU

The FBI’s Hostage Rescue Team (HRT) and Defensive Systems Unit (DSU) have made the switch to Aimpont. Both units have used various Eotechs for several years. Looks like they made the switch back in July to the Micro T2 and Micro H2. Here is the press release we received this morning from Aimpoint.


Aimpoint Press Release
Aimpoint Press Release

What Does “DRT” Stand For?


According to the manufacturer, it stands for “Dynamic Research Technologies” but the acronym more popularly stands for “Dead Right There”. Of course, this is no accident, the makers obviously want people to make that connection, but testing indicates that perhaps “Don’t Rightly Trust” or “Didn’t Really Test” may be more accurate names for this snake oil. Like many other gimmick ammo makers, DRT seems to be either unaware of the currently accepted and FBI recommended 12” minimum penetration standard or they just arrogantly ignore it.

As with previous tests of DRT, this 10mm version of their fragmenting pistol ammunition performed exactly as advertised. Unfortunately, the penetration is far too shallow to reliably reach vital organs. Invariably, the response to this criticism is that an average chest is only 8”-10” thick and the heart is less than 6” deep, even in a very large person, so 7” of penetration should be more than enough to reach the heart. The problem is that if you shoot a person in the middle of the chest who is standing motionless with their arms at their sides, that’s called “murder”. It may surprise some people to find that bad guys actually prefer not to be shot and they tend to move and shoot back at you when presented with the option. In doing so, that puts their arms out in front of their torso and that means that a bullet is very likely to strike a limb before impacting the torso. The fact that both parties to a gun fight are likely to me moving, ducking, perhaps even kneeling or prone on the floor also means that bullets tend to hit the torso at odd angles. If a bullet has to traverse diagonally through 6” of arm before even reaching the torso and on top of that, strikes the torso at an oblique angle, 12” of penetration might not even be enough, but it usually is enough, which is why that is the minimum standard. DRT can make an ugly wound, but it should not be trusted for defense.

Inland MFG 1911A1 Review Part 1


By now you  have probably seen my part one review of the Inland MFG  M1 carbine and know that the new Inland is making a niche for itself in the market for making WW2 reproductions or “re-issues.”  A few weeks ago I  got another gun from them. This time a 1911A1. It, like the M1, is aimed at the WW2 look and it does it very good and very close with one exception that no doubt will probably cause some panty twisting among people who think they know a lot about 1911s. But we will get to that in a bit.

The Inland  ‘A1 is obvious as to what it is and what it is meant to appeal to.  As soon as  it came in me and my friend,the FFL to which it was shipped for me,  were impressed.  The FFL immediately asking me if it was possible to buy the writers demo.  As the pictures show, it is a nice representation of the originals.

Continue reading Inland MFG 1911A1 Review Part 1

Propaganda Artwork


Some psywar from my Father’s war

Originally posted on Lost in Vietnam:

The determination of the Vietnamese people against foreign aggression. The Chinese, the French, and the US, all defeated, against all odds.
“Nothing is more valuable than Independence and Freedom”. A phrase that resonates in the hearts and minds of the Vietnamese people. They fought for their freedom until every last enemy was driven from their lands. Their home.

A collection of Propaganda artwork from Vietnam during and after the war. This powerful form of media was during the war and is still used today to inform citizens and to strengthen national pride.

View original

A Look At Buying Military Bolt Action Rifles PART 1

Many of the military rifles that end of in shooters hands are a little bit above  wall hangers said to be good shooters, but often  come with defects that make them inaccurate at best or dangerous to use at the worst. Others can be functional and fine as well as perfectly safe but have features that make them a real pain to use and feel terrible with hard to use sights or controls.

Beyond the rifles basic condition of looks some military rifles have problems that make them a lot less than desirable from a practical shooting stand point. Even though the rifles came from the world’s leading military powers at the time, the rifles can often have metallurgical or design flaws in rifles from certain time ranges of their production runs.   Low number M1903s and certain Krags being an example. Not to mention some are just bad ideas that came misguided military thinking. On top of that are rifles that can not be fired for lack of the now very rare ammo it takes to feed them.

When buying a surplus military rifle from a FFL or gun show the first thing you  should do is look at the bore. If possible by pulling the bolt and pointing the muzzle at a bright light. Do not let the fact that the bore is nice and shiny trick you. Do to the magic of abrasives, many pitted bores have been brought to fool the unknowing.   Look at the lands. It is the appearance of the lands that tells the tale when it comes to the  condition of the bore. They will be flat on top and nice and sharp at their upper and lower corners. Other than that, slugging a bore will tell you of the barrel is within spec or has been polished with abrasives to hone its appearance for casual inspection from possible buyers.

A shot out barrel with make the gun inaccurate and near useless though very rarely make the gun unsafe to shoot. head-space on the other hand is another matter,  Usually the result of a large chamber from wear or sloppy manufacture. Military rifles often have large chambers for reasons of function, but a rifle that will swallow a No-Go or filed gauge is not normal and is something you are risking harm with.  Another issue are triggers.  Usually military rifle triggers and very heavy but reliable. They can be effectively used with practice.   Some however had sear let off that was all over the board and could not be counted on to work the same way twice. Miss matched parts, worn  sear interface or problems with the cocking piece  or bolt.

Following are some of the more common military rifles found on the market popular with shooters and some of the issues to watch out for.


The springfield M1903 has a history of manufacture that is recounted in enough places and books to make the head swim so I am not going to go into it here. High on the list is the well known issue with heat treatment on the early production of the M1903.  The poorly done heat treatment left the receivers brittle  and failures of the parts when in use.  Sometimes shattering or breaking when tapped slightly by a metal rod.  The problem is encountered in rifles numbered below  800,000. these rifles are very suspect and it is not worth the risk of shooting, Some may have been treated in a way to make them safe, but there is no way to tell and best to not be fired.  The same problem exists with the rifles produced by Rock Island below 285,507. Most of these low numbered springfields were taken out of service a long time ago but they do show up at gun stores and gun shows, I have seen one turn up and a large show and a guns show in the past 10 years with both sellers having no idea ( or pretending not to know) the guns are unsafe to shoot no matter how good they looked. There is also a largish number of these rifles that were turned into “sporters” during years past and they should not be fired no matter how lucky the owner of the rifle may have been with it.

Another problem with the M1903 is the two piece firing pin which tends to break in a way that the tip protrudes from the bolt face. This condition can cause a primer to fire before the bolt lugs have engaged and lock the bolt into battery. An after market one piece firing pin can be bought to cure this issue easily.  One design issue I have rarely hear mentioned is the knurled bolt knob.  It should never be used to lower  by hand to decock the gun on a loaded chamber  This allows the firing pin to rest against the primer creating the risk of a discharge, Most custom gunsmith would remove this when making a custom sporter rifle from the ’03.


the M1917 Enfield rifle another popular rifle based on the British 1914 originally in .303 caliber, the rifle was chambered in 30.06 and issued to US troops to supplement and ended up being the rifle more widely issued during WW1.  While it is ugly in some eyes. The large rear sight protecting hoods and the dog legged bolt being the biggest eye sore to some, the rifle is very tough and strong with some being chambered in large dangerous game cartridges. Many found in modern times will show very heavy use with badly worn bores.  Usually the rifles with gun bores will out shoot the over rated M1903. The rear peep sight is much easier to use and is faster to use in fast combat conditions.  The rear peep is a great aid to those whose eye sight is less than perfect.


the Type 99 Arisaka is the most under appreciate military bolt action rifle out there.   Very strong and tough, PO Ackley’s destructive testing found the Type 99 to be the strongest military bolt action of them all. The 99 features a very strange but effective safety that requires you to press and turn with the palm to engage and disengage. While it sounds strange, with a few tries it very easy to get the hang of and is faster than some other safeties from the time.  The stock looks like a reject 2×4 from the local drunken saw mill operator with what appears to be a crack in the stock.  The “crack” was done one purpose and make the butt stock two piece and very strong in a clever design.  Many like to joke about the rear sight that folds and has wings that fold out for hitting moving aircraft.  The rear is very good in my opinion other than the  useless anti aircraft side folding features.   While it is further forward than a good rear peep, it does have a aperture rear sight that is large and fast to use, For further shots, you can fold it up in the ladder style like the M1903 with a smaller peep and markings for range.   The 7.7 Jap rounds is in the same power range as the 303 Brit round and can give fine results when hand-loaded with match .311 bullets,.   Price for factory ammo can run extreme or hand-loading.  Original ammo is pretty much collector stuff and very pricey.   One great feature on the Type 99 is the chrome lined bore. The finish is often rough with tool marks  but it can be very well done and beautiful.   In this case looks can fool you because if the Arisaka is in good condition , it is one of the best shooting military rifles.

FBI 9mm Justification FOIA

One of our loyal followers, who was very interested in the FBI 9mm Justification article from last year, submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for the FBI’s 9mm Executive Summary of Justification for Law Enforcement Partners. Our reader then provided us with a copy of the FOIA.  The FBI’s FOIA subject is titled: FBI Academy Caliber Specific Ammunition Trial. We figured someone else would have released the documents they had by now, as so many stated they also had it and vetted it, but no one has.

Our reader requested a lot of information in the FOIA and gave me the specific information requested. I would like to point out (Paragraphs 2 & 3) of the FOIA letter.  Paragraph 2 states, “Material consisting of 6 pages has been reviewed pursuant to Title 6, U.S. Code § 552 and this material is being released to you in its entirety with no excisions being made by the FBI”.  Paragraph 3 states, ” For your information, Congress excluded three discrete categories of law enforcement and national security records from the requirements of the FOIA. This response is limited to those records that are subject to the requirements of the FOIA”.

After reviewing our readers requested information and vetting it through some of our sources, certain information requested in the FOIA is listed as Law Enforcement Sensitive/Classified by the FBI/Gov and that information was not released in the FOIA. This is the reason for the Appeal process outlined in Paragraphs 4 & 5. The Executive Summery is identical to the one we received over a year ago through official channels. I think we have done our due diligence on vetting the info. The info is identical and accurate to what we previously had and we can now release the actual Executive Summary.

I did make small changes for our previous article, as I stated for ease of reading, and you can now see those small changes. Bellow is the FOIA given to use and I have redacted specific information at the request of the owner/provider of the FOIA.

You can see our original article, with an easy to ready text of the Executive Sumary here: 2014/09/21 FBI-9mm-Justification-FBI-Training-Division

FOIA Letter
FOIA Letter
FIOa Page 1
FOIA Page 1
FOIA Page 2
FOIA Page 2
FOIA Page 3
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FOIA Page 6

My Suggestions / Upgrades on your Carry Glock 43

The single stack 9mm market is huge. The Smith & Wesson’s Shield and the new Glock 43 are dominating that market. One great thing about Glock’s is the fact that just about everyone makes parts and accessories for them. The aftermarket accessories and parts are plentiful, and easy to install. So now you have your G43, you have run ample carry ammo through it and it is ready for carry. What are the must haves for your G43.  Let’s keep this simple and pick the three (3) absolute must haves for your Every Day Carry (EDC) G43.

(1) High Quality Holster

(2) Sights

(3) + Mag Extension / Base Pad

Continue reading My Suggestions / Upgrades on your Carry Glock 43

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