All posts by Shawn

Long Term, Hard Use FootWear

Today we have a guest post from sporadic contributor and quasi-Looserounds member  “CJ”, about his favorite topic. 

 

Prepping – Some thoughts… A lot of gun enthusiasts seem to justify their hobby as some sort of preparation for armageddon. Sure, when the aliens invade I won’t deny the usefulness of an arsenal. But let’s not deny the usefulness of other items. Food storage is commonly thought of. Less commonly thought of is footwear. Unlike other looserounds contributors, I didn’t grow up around firearms. My parents’ household to this day is a “gun free zone,” complete with the usual objections to self defense. But I did grow up hiking, camping, and backpacking. I may have as many years of experience being serious about footwear as Shawn has being serious about the 1911.
Footwear cannot be neglected. Anyone who is a fan of the Walking Dead (I’m assuming the majority of Looserounds’ readership) should realize how much walking people are forced to do in a zombie attack. In our normal daily lives we take these things for granted. In an apocalyptic scenario, we may need to walk long distances regularly and we will need to avoid injuries (sprains/blisters/etc) while doing so. Our feet, like a good 1911, should be something we can rely on. I want to share some of my thoughts and experiences in this area and will limit the discussion today to boots.
First, let’s realize that we aren’t going to become like the Confederate soldiers who marched long distances barefoot overnight. If you’re the type of person who has managed to build up a quarter inch of leathery callous on your feet, you’re probably already barefoot and you probably don’t have internet access and probably aren’t reading this. Two of the three people who have done this are somewhere in the Amazon rainforest and the other guy is a Kenyan persistence hunter. That just simply isn’t realistic right now for us today. We need footwear that won’t fail us today, but more importantly won’t fail us tomorrow when we might not be able to buy new shoes.
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The first pair of shoes/boots I want to introduce is the Salomon Quest 4D GTX. Let me first say that these are the most comfortable boots I’ve ever worn, right out of the box. They require zero “break in.” I recommend them for daily wear, but they will not last and you should not count on them as a long term solution. The boots pictured here have about a year’s worth of wear, there is a hole in the sole, and they’ve been glued back together twice. Next, I want to introduce their polar opposite.
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The Raichle Montagna. In this picture there are 3 pairs. Two of them are new and the one on the right has 3 times as much wear as the Solomon boots above. They really are indestructable. But they’re heavy, hard to break-in, and very hard to find today. This is closer to what I’m talking about. You may not like them at first, but long after the Salomons are gone they’ll still be fine. This matters if civilization ends tomorrow. In fact, I’ve stockpiled these for just such an event. Some minor discomfort caused by their admittedly heavy weight is not going to injure you, and provided you have a pair that is broken in, the benefits are very clear. And if they aren’t broken in, soak them in baseball glove conditioner and just wear them every other day until they mold to your foot. Alternate with something else to avoid injury. They’re priceless.
Similar boots have also been made by Lowa, Scarpa, and Vasque. In fact, the Vasque Montana is almost a direct copy. Vasque is a great company that made my first pair of hiking boots (the Sundowner II). I wore these on roughly 30 serious backpacking trips over approximately 10 years and about half the time during the week to work/school. I still have them somewhere. Today I wear a pair of Vasque St Elias boots (hown in the 3rd picture) every day. These have the same wear as the Solomons above, but they’re still in great shape. They’re a good compromise between comfort and ruggedness. I would also trust them over the long run (pun intended). Shawn tends to favor Merrell boots, and I’ve tried them as well, but I put them in the same category as Salomon. They’re certainly comfortable and that is valuable. But this comes at a cost–light/flexible construction. I personally don’t trust them for anything other than work. Without a decent pair of boots, you need to realize that you will quickly be reduced to trying to cut sandals from used tires.
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The Listening / Security Halt

The following is repost from Hognose at weaponsman.com.  Weaponsman is an excellent weapon related website that is a friend to this website and also a favorite internet stop.

 

The most annoying person in the world is the write-only device. You know that guy: he never shuts up, yammering on and on, and never stopping to listen, only to take a breath. As you might expect, that habit which makes everyone want to kill him in a peacetime classroom or office, makes it easy for the enemy to literally kill him in combat.

There is much to be said about stealth and silence. The first thing that we will say is this: truly silent motion across terrain is not possible. It is an ideal for which you must strive, but even Mark Twain recognized it as nothing but a literary convention, when he was beating the defenseless James Fenimore Cooper senseless in a battle of wits:

Another stage-property that he pulled out of his box pretty frequently was the broken twig. He prized his broken twig above all the rest of his effects, and worked it the hardest. It is a restful chapter in any book of his when somebody doesn’t step on a dry twig and alarm all the reds and whites for two hundred yards around. Every time a Cooper person is in peril, and absolute silence is worth four dollars a minute, he is sure to step on a dry twig. There may be a hundred other handier things to step on, but that wouldn’t satisfy Cooper. Cooper requires him to turn out and find a dry twig; and if he can’t do it, go and borrow one. In fact, the Leatherstocking Series ought to have been called the Broken Twig Series.

It was always a Cooper white man who broke the twig, because Indians were born to patient stealth, at least in his universe. (Cooper, one must remember, was no frontiersman, but a cashiered Naval Academy midshipman). The Indian, in fact, was no more capable of silent movement than a ninja, an SF soldier, or you.

It was a crushing disappointment to learn that we would not, in SFQC, learn the Indian ninja art of silent walking on dry oak leaves. Instead, however, we learned something more practically useful: how to be quieter than the other guy, and as quiet as we needed to be.

If silent movement is not possible — and it isn’t, if your enemy can’t hear you, his dogs, with their superhuman hearing, can — then moving stealthily at night requires several things:

  1. Masking local noise with background noise;
  2. Altering the kinds of noise to attenuate sound travel; and,
  3. Periodic listening halts.

Not hard enough? Try it in MOPP.

The first two are fairly obvious: you can move much more rapidly without giving yourself away when a train is passing by, and high-pitched sounds travel poorly. (You do need to bear in mind that sound travels differently in different atmospheric conditions). The most complicated of those three principles of night movement to apply is the periodic listening halt.

Immediately after inserting, assembly, or crossing a danger area (of which more in some subsequent article), the patrol or team must conduct an initial listening security halt. While the details of the halt may vary, something like this works:

  1. Freeze in place.
  2. Remain there for five full minutes. 
  3. Maintain 360º security.
  4. Actively listen the whole time.
  5. After five minutes, make a decision: move, or continue listening?

Why five minutes? You can change that time if you like, but it’s a good minimum because it’s quite a long time to be frozen in one place. Even a patient enemy, who stops when you do, will move and give his existence and position away before five minutes is up.

Active listening? That means concentrating on listening. You’re not only listening for the enemy, but also to develop a mental picture of what normal night sounds in your location are like. What are they like immediately when you stop? If you have been halted for a time, are there animal noises that come back (and that presumably stopped while you were moving)? Knowing this gives you an edge in the woods, compared to someone who doesn’t.

After the initial halt, the element leader must have a way to silently signal the element to begin moving again. If there is sufficient illumination, hand and arm signals may be effective; if not, touch signals should be used. Only in the most extreme case should a command be verbalized, and then, it should be whispered (remember, a higher-pitched whisper will travel much more poorly than a normal-pitched vocalized word — which is a good thing in a night full of hostiles).

It goes without saying that all these modes of command and control, and the listening security halts themselves, must be practiced in controlled conditions in garrison before attempting them in the face of an armed enemy. Night combat patrol operations are at the far end of a long crawl-walk-run pipeline; they’re the Boston Marathon of crawl-walk-run.

Animal and bird sounds make both effective stealth command and control means, and also excellent “cover” if you inadvertently make a sound in the possible presence of the enemy. Do a Leatherstocking and break a twig, or snap back a branch? The risk of exposure may be mitigated, if you can fake the snort of a deer or porcine species native to the area.

Once the element is on the move, further listening security halts should be executed at relatively short but variable periods. You can set these by distance or by time; it’s also helpful to be cognizant of terrain. If you have just passed through some stuff that was impossible to be truly quiet in, like dense mountain laurel or the dry leaves of an oak forest in winter, a listening security halt on the far side should be able to reassure you about the prospect of being tracked or tailed. As in all patrol technique, principles are iron but the means of serving those principles are best mixed up so as not to simplify the enemy’s counterpatrol planning.

Don’t be the foot-shufflin’, twig-snappin’, noise-makin’ equivalent of the yammering guy in the first paragraph. On patrol, the silent man comes home; the guy who loves the sound of his own noise dies from it.

About Hognose

Former Special Forces 11B2S, later 18B, weapons man. (Also served in intelligence and operations jobs in SF).

 

 

 

New 2016 Colt Delta Elite 10mm Part 2 : Accuracy Test

Last time we took a look at the new Delta Elite 10mm pistol from Colt, we saw the refinements on the new Delta, compared to the classic Delta Elite from the 1980s. In my opinion , it is a very fine pistol.  It has all of the “custom production” enhancements I want in a modern M1911, that I intend to carry and use as opposed to set in a safe.

With the new Delta being  obviously configured for carry and hunting in mind, I used a variety of ammo choices in this go around.   I chose some modern carry /defense loads along with ball practice/training ammo.  There are still some brands and types of 10mm ammo out there I have not gotten my hands on yet and when I do I will add to this review or update.    One thing I kept in mind this time, is the cost of the  10mm ammo and how likely the average buyer could find them in the local gun store.   My thinking is to mix in ammo the new buyer, who is not a dedicated 10mm lover, would likely see in the same store the gun was being sold.   I did mix in carry and high performance ammo that would also be encountered in a store, compared to some of the more expensive high end ammo from places like Double Tap.  Lastly, I did not ignore the reality that money is tight for most people these days and most 10mm shooting is likely to be done with ball training ammo.  As I said above, a future post with high performance 10mm ammo will be upcoming.

The groups shown are an average of all rounds fired from each ammo type.  I fired from a bench rest with sand bags, with ranges marked on the target.  Shooting was slow fire with most groups taking at least 5 minutes to complete, to give the ammo every bit of concentration and effort I had.  I did fire off hand in a few instances to take a better look at how the gun and ammo combination would do in a self defense situation.  The third part of this review will be shooting the Delta at longer ranges of 75, 100 and possibly 200 yards, to illustrate how the 10mm round really benefits from its higher velocity and power.

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First, I want to talk about the big surprise for me. The Armscor ammo was a brand I have had little experience with.  The gun loved this ammo.  I have not verified its velocity or any specs on it other than bullet weight, but it was noticeably hotter than the other generic FMJ plinking and training ammo.  As far as I am concerned, for now, if I want ball ammo for the Delta or for any thing, this is what I will be using, until I find some other ball ammo that shoots better.

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The PPU 180 grain hollow point was not so great and felt like a medium power load. Of course the dual spring system can be throwing off my judgement on account of it working so well to tame the 10mm recoil.   This group is normal for PPU ammo in my experience.  I have tried PPU match and have not seen it live up to any of its marketing claims. It is nice plinking ammo though and it has the benefit of being easy to find locally.

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The Federal Trophy Bonded soft point is another round I have little experience with.  It shot great and would be a good choice for hunting if you are a believer in the bonded bullets from Federal. It could also serve double duty for self defense. I also fired a Federal Hydo Shock round, that shot about the same but I confess to losing the target it was shot on before I could take a picture.

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The Winchester 175 grain Silver Tip hollow point. This is an old favorite of mine from back when the 10mm was  in its early days in the 80s.  A very good round and highly thought of at the time. It is still the first pick among a lot of people for CCW.   I  have had these rounds for a long time but a quick check at Midway showed me this round is still being made and sold.  It has always shot very well for me and was perfectly reliable in all three (3) of the Delta Elites I  have owned.  The Silver Tip is pretty well regarded by a lot of people including myself and if I was not a convert on the use of solid copper hollow points, this would be a load I would stock up on for daily carry.   Apologies for the blurred picture.

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The Hornady Critical Duty with the flex tip shot outstanding, as the group above shows. I used this load as the “match load” standard, for accuracy and  for the rest of the tests for longer range groups.  Reports and testing show the round to be very effective on ballistic gel. Friends who have more experience with it, tell me it is superb.  Until I settle on a solid copper HP load for this gun , this is the load I have been using as a place holder in the gun for CCW.

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The S&B  ball ammo seemed to always shoot 3 rounds tight and then toss the last 2.  It feels like a mid powered plinking round. Which it is. Good for training and plinking. Its not too expensive but nothing special.  I saw this ammo have problems in a Kimber 10mm and even a glock. If you want some ammo to plink with I would say it is ok,  but understand what you are getting.

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Another offering from Hornady is the XTP round.  A good solid round that shots great. I would have been shocked if it didn’t.

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This is a group fired off hand with the Fed American Eagle ball ammo.  I fired it off hand  as I had already put up the bags and my set up.  I happened upon just a few rounds of this ammo. I fired it offhand and it did about what I expected from it. It is always reliable and decent training quality ammo.

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Now we get to trying the ammo in a method more in line with real world self defense.  This group is fired at 25 yards, off hand.  I did  shoot it at a slow methodical pace, to get the best out of itself and myself as I could.  I fired eight (8)  rounds of the Critical Duty ammo using the center of the large orange sticker as my aiming point.  I think  you can’t really ask for much more out of it.  The group would easily fit inside a target the size of a human face or inside something the size of a human heart.  This target group is one of the reasons this ammo is what I am currently using as the CCW ammo for the Delta.

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For fun I took the gun out to 50 yards using the Hornady ammo.  I fired this group from the bags and bench.  I have to say I was pretty pleased with myself on this one! Too bad I couldn’t shoot that same level off hand at a bulls eye match.  This target shows you that the 10mm is fully capable of an easy hit on a man sized target at 100 yards, which we will be doing in part 3 of the review.

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Of course with the group from the bags being as good as it was, I had to try it off hand at 50.  I fired ten (10) rounds off hand (though two handed) and got most of them on the target.  For my excuse, I am going to admit that buy this time I was getting pretty tired.  Shooting a 10mm for hours is harder work than  you may think.  It doesn’t have the nice soft push of a 45 ACP or childish slap of a 9mm. It starts to wear on you.  I am confident I could have done better if I started this fresh.

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The new generation Delta Elite is proving itself to be everything I hoped it would be. It has already over taken the place in my heart the  older original version occupied.   After a little over 1,500 rounds so far, it has had no problems and has all the extra touches I want.  It has been my daily carry since I received it and it will be with me come hunting season.

In part 3 of the T&E of the new Delta, we will be shooting it out to as far as I can possible make a hit with it, to take advantage of the powerful 10mm round. We will be adding in some drills and training to get a handle on what a new 10mm user may have to get used to, if they are interested in moving up to a new level in power, by letting some one who has never fired a 10mm do some drills with it.  Check back in the next few weeks to see that and more.

 

 

Rare Civilian Legal Colt XM148

Below are some pictures sent to me by good friend to the website, Trey Moore, owner of MooreMilitaria.  He is selling something that is rarely seen on the market.  The ultra rare Xm148 made by Colt.

This is the Vietnam war era grenade launcher that mounts to the barrel of the M16 family of weapons.  It has the X designation because it was never made standard. The M203 was the grenade launcher that was adopted by the military for use with the M16 series  and is still in use today.   Trey tells me there only about 6 of them on the registry.

If you have the money and want this one you can find it at http://www.mooremilitaria.com. You can get to it by clicking on the banner link on the right.   It is certainly a once in a life time chance.   For the rest of us, enjoy the detailed pictures of the system.

 

 

The New 2016 Colt Delta Elite 10mm Review Part 1

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The Colt Delta Elite  M1911 has been around since the  1980s. It was  Colt and the Delta Elite that came in at the last minute and saved the 10mm round from death.  While never a huge best seller it has come and gone over the years since the first models hit shelves.  It did go away for a while but as recently as a few years ago was brought back by colt in its original retro form and sold pretty well.  While it was a great gun and true to its original issue, it was a bit bare stock for now a days.   In May of this year, all of us who wanted a Delta Elite in a more modern combat carry package without having to send the stock model off to a gunsmith, got what we had been waiting for.

First Look At Colt’s New Delta Elite 10mm

The new Delta is everything I personally wanted for a long time. It has all the refinements I want in a M1911 that I plan to use for more than setting in the safe.  It has my favorite Novak Combat sights. It has an extended safety, the under side of the trigger guard is cut for a higher grip. it has a competition trigger and a beaver tail grip safety and is de-horned for carry comfort in addition to other upgrades.

Before I get into a deeper look at the piece, I should add right away that I did change a couple of things as I am want to do.  While I like the safety that comes from the factory and think its a fine part, I much prefer the feel and size and shape of the STI extended safety be it single or ambi.  Colt used to provide the STI on its XSE and upgraded guns until recently switching to what I believe is the Wilson Combat safety.  I replaced the Wilson part with my personal preferred safety.

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The Next change on the gun that I make on almost all of my 1911s is a part that I have had a long standing love affair with.   That is the S&A stainless steel checked main spring housing.  Again, the factory has so issues and I can not fault it. I just have my personal  quirks like we all do and when given a chance I can not resit making tiny changes to a 1911 to make it more my own.  To see the gun in its unaltered form, I provided the link to my original first look over review of the Delta from a few months ago posted above.

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Now that we got that out of the way so no one will wonder why their Delta looks different than the one reviewed here, its time to take a look.

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The new Delta is standard Colt 1911 with some obvious slight changes. It comes apart just like any other Colt and Colt’s apparently millions of copiers.

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The recoil spring is the new double spring system. It is the same concept as used on the USMC’s MARSOC  M1911 recently adopted and also made by Colt. You can find a review of it here as well.  It does not have the full length guide rode that is essentially pointless.

The recoil that results from the new dual spring was a huge surprise for me.  I have had several older Deltas over the years and full power 10mm ammo is  not exactly something you would want to pound yourself with all day long. But this makes it pleasant and I could barely tell a different between the 10mm ammo and 45 ACP. The lower power 10mm auto loads are very pleasant to shoot with the new recoil spring set up.  This seems to be a new standard practice on most of the more combat and competition 1911s from Colt now and I’m liking it a lot so far.  I confess I have not attempted to take these two apart from each other because I have no inclination to see how much of a pain it may or may not be at this point. I most likely won’t do it either until they need replacing from normal use.

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The cut out for the slide release is the full relief. This is pretty common now a days but there was a time when it was not standard. It was originally done because of the cracking that would appear on the old light weight commanders after long term hard use. A crack in the area effected nothing but some anal retentive types (like the kind of guy who loses sleep over brass marks or dings on his AR15s case deflector) ability to sleep at night witohut worrying over it.  Obviously it is expect especially on a  1911 in this round as it is a powerful round and some of the loads are very hot and hard on a gun.

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Yes. It is the so called “series 80.” Deal with it.    There is nothing wrong with that, I have been using series 80  guns for 30 some years and never had a problem. The trigger is  crisp and breaks clean. Anyone who tells you not to buy a gun if it has the series 80 style safety is an idiot that can be ignored or treated like  your liberal mother in law.

 

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The barrel is standard 1911. I know some people moan and grown over this because they want to shoot rounds  that are super hot.  I don’t care one way or the other.  I do not load the ammo  to pressures high enough to need to worry about it.  The hotter self defense loads from the factories work for me. In my mind, if you want that kind of performance out of your 10mm, buy a revolver or send the gun off and have it fitted with the barrel you want. I think if I was going to do that I would go ahead and go all the way and have a 40.SW and a .357sig barrel fitted for it at the same time and have the use of all the rounds.  otherwise, the standard, original barrel fills all my needs.

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Here is another look at the under cut.  This is such a nice little enhancement that it should always bee standard on anything that is not a retro nostalgia repro.  The strange thing about this is that I thought for many years it was appreciated by everyone until I mentioned it to some casual 1911s owners and they never noticed it.  I guess that goes to show how far enhanced production 1911s have come since the days when this sort of thing was a custom gunsmith  only feature.  In my opinion, M1911s from factories and gun smiths are the better than they ever where including some of the custom guns from back in the day.

While it may only be a personal taste, I really like the new black trigger against the SS gun. I noticed this trend with the Colt Defender a couple of years ago and really like hot it contrasts and looks with the black sights .

Another change  is the new grips. For years the Deltas always had the standard wrap around rubber grips.  These are still rubber, but obviously do not wrap. I like the slimmer grip though all day pounding of full power ammo does make the older wrap feel pretty good.  Of course the grips have the iconic Delta Elite triangle. The wrap around rubber grip with red triangle have been on the Delta for a long time.  A older catalog shows some from days past below .  The wrap around grips are almost an institution for the Delta but I really like the look and feel of the new grip.  I have an original wrap grip that I put on it for a while to compare before taking it back off and I am sure some will miss it.  Maybe Colt will offer up the older grip as a factory part at the online store for those who want it.

For those curious who want to see the older original grips, below the catalog is a picture of my ultra-rare Delta Elite Gold Cup in blued steel with original wrap around rubber grips.

If you can not wait till part 2 and the accuracy test/review, yes the new Delta out shoots the original Gold Cup Delta,and the GC Delta is Very accurate already.

Colt-Delta-Elite-1990-catalog

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The mags are the standard Colt mags. Same design used for the Super .38.

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They of course are marked 10mm Auto.   Thanks to Hunter at Rangehot.com. I learned that the standard  magazine for  45 ACP will cycle and feed in the 10mm gun.  I admit to having no idea about this but after he mentioned it to me, I tried it and could not believe I went all these years not knowing.  Now, I don’t know if all mags for the 45 guns will work perfect all the time and always lock back when empty. And I would not carry 45 mags for the gun if I thought I was going to have to fight with it. But they will do in a pinch. If you are at the range and need more mags for whatever reason or you lose or destroy the 10mm mags or if you just want some more mags and can not afford the pricey purpose made mags, the 45 ACP mags will work.  I tried Wilson Combat 45 ACP mags and standard Colt 7 and 8 round mags and they worked no problem what time I used them.  Use that info however you want.   But I recommend sticking with the purpose made 10mm mags if you are going to CCW.

On another magazine note, I have tried one other  company’s 10mm  mags.  I picked up 4 Kimber mags from a local gun store and all 4 had problems.    In my experience this is typical of kimber mags.  I was not very surprised and was glad I did not pay the full price for the things.  They do seem to work about 3 out of five times though.  Otherwise the standard USGI  45 ACP mags work better in the gun and of course the mags that came with the pistol are flawless.      I say all that to say, you can use other mags other than ones specifically marked “10mm”  if you need to or are having trouble finding extras, but keep in mind the potential for mischief.

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I have fired  the new Delta quite a bit so far and it is everything I hoped it would be when I was first told by Colt they  had sent me one  before the NRA show.  It feels good. It really is hard to explain but it feels really good.  As we stood around the booth for it at the NRA show I heard people comment on how great it felt over and over.  You’d think  that’s crazy as it is a 1911 like other 1911s, just in 10mm but its true.   It indeed has a lot of enhancements over all the early Deltas, and in my opinion is nicer than the nicest of the older Gold Cup Delta Elites nice as they are.   It is not tricked out for competition since who really wants to use 10mm all day in 3 gun or IPSC or whatever. it is set up for carry or hunting and it is very nice.  I have been daily CCWing it since it arrived and its rubber grips and de-horning make it comfortable. And the thought of the power of the 10mm and the hornady ammo is very comforting.

 

Part 2 of the Delta Elite review will be up soon with accuracy testing, handling and  longer range shooting to take advantage of the rounds  flatter trajectory and speed.

 

 

 

 

20 Years With a Model 590 Mossberg

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The Mossberg 590 shotgun has been around a long time and needs no introduction by me.  That is for the best, since this article is not really a historic recounting of the weapon but more of a look back at a shotgun that I and a dear friend have a 20 year history with.

The 590 pictured above was purchased 20 years ago, almost to the day.  My friend bought it during the summer of our sophomore year in college.  For some reason the look of the gun really appealed to us both. Much like today, guns like this really  worried liberals of the time,  thinking things like bayonet lugs endangered western civilization, it was a real plus to have a shotgun that didn’t look like the Clinton approved  “duck gun” fudds would use.

We used this thing hard, I mean really hard. We treated it about as rough as you could treat one without destructive testing.  It took a trip into a swift moving river that filled it with sand and silt.  It fired slugs and buck and the “Dragon’s Breathe” novelty rounds that could be bought at the time.   It was even used as a crutch on a muddy mountain side one day, after I fell and hurt my leg.   It has a lot of memories.   That something like this could have such good memories and sentimental attachment is something no liberal , gun banner could ever understand.

Things have changed for all of us in the last 20 years.  My friend and I have moved on to more flashy shotguns like the Bennelli M4 and the Saiga, as well as an assortment of 870s and more than a few retro M1897 Winchesters.    But now that we have hit the 20 year mark, we decided to drag it out and take a serious look at something we never gave much serious thought to at the time.

We got the old 590 out for a day of shooting and testing to see what it had in it.  We fired it with slugs,  00 Buck and some regular hunting loads just for fun.  You can see the results of  the loads intended for a shotgun like this below.

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Pictured above is a group of slugs fired at the target from about 60 yards.  The bright orange square being te aiming point.  The gun was fired from a rest using the factory bead front sight.  The ammo was federal police slugs.   Noteworthy is the 3 shot group clustered very tightly together at the far left.   Not bad for a smooth bore!

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A close up look  shows just how tight those 3 shots grouped.  The shot to the far right was a (called) flyer. With a red dot or some more precises method of aiming and zeroing, the combo of this slug and the gun would easily make a head shot on an adult male.

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The above picture shows the pattern of three rounds of OO Buck at 25 yards.  The gun, the ammo or the shooter seem to shoot a bit high and to the left.  I don’t have answer for you  otherwise because I had no desire to pound myself with buck and slugs. I have always found the recoil of that 590 less than pleasant so I could not think of a compelling reason to punish myself with it again.

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Above is another three rounds of buck fired at 15 yards.  All pellets easily printed inside the red.  The red sticker was used as it was very close to the chest that covered all vital organs.  At this range, few things on this earth could have survived.

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Last is three rounds of the buck at 7 yards.  No surprises here. The close pattern of the buck would be almost the same as three slugs. The pellets did spread enough to make wounds bigger than a solid slug though and without a doubt would cause massive destruction at such close range.

I went on to shoot the normal hunting loadings of 6, 4 and 9 1/2 shot and worked over the old car left on the range and various skeet.   The gun has always functioned well. It  has proven that over the  years for  various LE and Government agencies in shootout all over the globe.  The Mossberg 500 action is a more simple version of the excellent Remington Model 31  action, a shotgun I have the highest regard for and has spawned other well loved shotguns like the Ithaca M37.

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The shotgun itself is the classic 590 from the time period. As you can see in the pictures our use and time have been rough on it, but other than cosmetics, it has had no effect. It does have the evil bayonet lug that has scared so many over the years. Sorry to say neither of us remembered to bring a M7 bayonet to mount on it for pictures.    My friend, the owner, did have a side sling swivel mounted as he is an evil lefty and needed it.

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The brand and type that side sling swivel has been lost to time and memory but it works fine  and has stood up to the same abuses the gun has.

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This M590 has been in our lives a long time. I can’t even begin to tell you all the things this gun as seen and been subjected to. It has been sidelined into my friend’s safe for a long time now but there was some talk on testing day of maybe a rail mounted to the receiver for mounting of an RMR.  Maybe in the future it will have been updated with more modern sighting and some other little upgrades.  But probably not.  Likely it will go on being our whipping boy.     It is a classic though and we always have a spot for it in our hearts.