All posts by Duncan

New Glock 17M, Gen5?

There are some leaked pictures hitting the web today. It was reported first today by (TFB), who obtained some pictures from Indianapolis PD officers being issued the new G-17M yesterday. Several places/bloggers/youtubers and meany more in the firearm industry started to post photos of the firearm, they have seen or shot. So it is safe to say this might be the Gen5 Glock.  Usually new Glocks are leaked way before they actually hit the street. I am quite surprised we did not here anything about them. Glock keep a good lid on it this time.  It is reported that a G-19M is also coming.   This is probably the new weapon that the FBI purchased.  Thought we would get these photos out to our readers ASAP.

Glock G-17M
Glock G-17M

Looks like a mix of a Gen2 and Gen4 Glock, with more ambidextrous features.  Some of the new features are reported as follows:

1. New, “tougher” finish
2. Different rifling / traditional rifle grooves
3. Longer RSA
4. Reinforced front RSA notch
5. Smoother trigger
6. Flared / beveled magwell
7. Gen2 like Front Strap/ No Finger Groves
8. Safety plunger is oblong/rectangular G42/G43 like
9. Ambidextrous slide release
10. Magazine well cut out / like old Gen2 & Gen3

Duncan

Glock G-17M
Glock G-17M
Ambidextrous Slide Stop
Ambidextrous Slide Stop
No Finger Grooves / Gen2 like Front Strap
No Finger Grooves / Gen2 like Front Strap
New Longer Recoil Assembly
New Longer Recoil Assembly
Glock G-17M
Glock G-17M

 

 

Manticore Arms NightShroud MK II Flash Hider

Just picked up a Manticore Arms NightShroud MK II Flash Hider for testing with the DDI AK74S. These are actually very hard to find right now. The Manticore Arms NightBrake is very easy to find, but I wanted a flash hider, as the 5.45×39 round does not have a lot of recoil, so a muzzle brake is not needed. The NightShroud looks pretty damn nice. It has a 24mm (Right Hand Thread) standard for most AK74 rifles. It will work with both 5.45×39 and 7.62×39  rifles with 24mm threads. I really like the multiple detent locking notches around the NightShroud. The detents allow a nice tight fit, eliminating any wobble.  It is also quite a bit shorter than the standard AK74 muzzle brake  Here are a few quick pictures of it mounted right out of the box.

Manticore Arms NightShroud MK II flash hider
Manticore Arms NightShroud MK II flash hider
NightShroud mounted on DDI AK74
NightShroud mounted on DDI AK74
Manticore Arms NightShroud
Manticore Arms NightShroud
DDI AK74s Rifle with NightShroud
DDI AK74s Rifle with NightShroud
Manticore Arms NightShroud MK II flash hider
Manticore Arms NightShroud MK II flash hider

Magpul AK74 MOE 5.45x39mm Magazine

Looks like Magpul is about to release an AK74 PMAG. There have been rumors as far back as the 2015 NRA meeting and 2016 Shot Show but nothing concrete ever came out. The new PMAG is designed for Kalashnikov pattern rifles in 5.45x39mm (AK74, MPi-AK-74N, PA md. 86, and others). It is currently listed on Magpul’s site at 13.95 a mag.  It  has all the usual Magpul PMAG MOE magazine features found in the AK47 7.62×39 magazines. There is no further information out there that I can find on the new 5.45 Magpul magazine, other than it should be release this Summer (2016). Places like 44 Mag have them listed on the site. DSG Arms and Brownells are already taking Pre-Orders on the new AK74 5.45×39 PMAG. I’m sure they will be popping up very soon, as it is a highly anticipate product in the AK74 community, so keep an eye out if you are in that market.

Magpul AK74 MOE 5.45x39mm
Magpul AK74 MOE 5.45x39mm

FEATURES

  • Impact and crush resistant all polymer body
  • Constant-curve internal geometry for smooth feeding
  • Anti-tilt, self-lubricating follower for increased reliability
  • Long life stainless steel spring
  • Ribbed gripping surface and aggressive front and rear texture for positive magazine handling
  • Paint pen dot matrix panels on the bottom of the body to allow for identification marking
  • Flared floorplate aids magazine handling and disassembly yet is slim enough for use with most pouches
Magpul AK74 Magazine
Magpul AK74 Magazine

Duncan.

The Accuracy International AE

Submitted by  “G”  a professional sniper and lifelong friend of the Loose Rounds site owners. “G”  will be writing some articles for Loose Rounds in the coming months.

In the by-gone days of 2004 I was hip deep in the word of tactical shooting.  I had been on my departments SWAT Team as a Sniper for a couple years but have been obsessed with sniping since the late 1990’s, when my father was a LEO sniper for the same department.  I read anything I could about the subject, been to a couple schools, and with any free time I had was practicing.

I had been around the typical M700 and other typical sporting rifles my entire life.  I was issued a Remington PSS and had no problems with it but I wanted my own personal “tactical”
rifle.  I looked at companies like Robar, McMillan, HS Precision and others, but when I visited the Accuracy International web site I found what I wanted.  The Accuracy International AW series was way out of my means at the time but the AE, now known as the AE MK1, was just inside reach.  From what the site said it was the same as the AW series without certain benefits and was gear toward the LE community.  It featured a 24″ 1:12 twist barrel, 3.5 lbs trigger, and a very distinctive look.  So off to a local FFL dealer.

Accuracy International AE 7.62x51
Accuracy International AE 7.62×51

Once this British beauty arrived in this my hands I knew I had made a good choice of rifle. It wasn’t setup for the Parker Hale bipod, which I didn’t like anyway, instead a simple sling swivel attachment for a Harris bipod was attached to the bottom of the chassis system.  Its safety was “safe” and “fire” only, instead of the three position safety on the AW series.  Of course it is chambered in  7.62 X 51 (308 Win),  had an overall length of 44″ and weighed around 13 lbs.

7.52x51mm
7.52x51mm

The LOP was adjustable with spacers which came with the rifle.  It was set up with a 0 MOA rail already on the receiver for mounting scopes. The AE came with one 5 round magazine, the Mk1 is not able to use the AI 10 round magazines.  The chassis had four sling mounts, two on each side.  Now a days the Accuracy International chassis system is available for a variety of rifles but then it was AI only.  The stock simply screwed onto the chassis system and its only function was to provide something to hold onto. The bolt handle had a distinctive angle and appearance that even for a left hander, like me, provided easy and smooth manipulation.

Accuracy International AE
Accuracy International AE

I managed to top the rifle with a 6.5-20 MK IV Leupold, it has since been refitted with a 4-14 MK IV. The next step was to find a round for this beast to fire.  I had picked up a couple boxes of Hornady 30 caliber 178 gr AMAX.

AE w/ Leopuld Mounted
AE w/ Leupold Mounted

After doing some load development I found a load that the rifle liked.

-Federal Premium Brass trimmed to 2.005

-CCI LR Primer.  Primer pocket and flash hole uniformed.

-43.0grs of IMR 4064

-178 gr Hornady AMAX and Hornady HPBT seated to magazine length.

10 round group fired from 100 yards
10 round group fired from 100 yards

The AE is comfortable shooting from the bench or prone position.  It does become slightly awkward but not undoable from field shooting positions, as found out by yours truly and Loose Rounds owner Shawn.  The information provided with the AE from Accuracy International stated that the AE model was a 600 yard gun.  We came to find that the rifle was very capable of consistent hits out to 1000 yards.  Many a day was spent with this rifle busting skeet and ringing steel at 800 yards and it may be just me being bias, but this rifle made it seem easy to do so.  I have saved many targets from this rifle that was a testament to its accuracy but through the years they have disappeared.

Over the years I have owned and shot other very accurate rifles but this little 600 yard British rifle will always be my favorite.

“G”

Centruy Arms RAS 47

Century Arms Red Army Standard (RAS) 47.  An AKM variant with some American made modifications.  Century is boasting some 1.5 MOA predictions on this thicker 4150 ESS barrel. We have seen some reviews with impressive accuracy and look forward to Century providing us with a rifle to test out.

Century Arms Canik TP9 SFX

Our guys at the NRA 2016 meeting are doing a great job. One place we really wanted to visit was Century Arms.  We wanted to take a look at the Canik TP9 SF pistol.  As we were looking for the TP9 SF the guys at Century pointed us to the TP9 SFX which is the long slide competition version of the TP9 series.  Like the TP9 SF it has dove tail front and rear sights, so you can add any after marked compatible sights you like and  the TP9 SFX can be configure to handle red dot sights with it extra slots in the slide. Since the TP9 SF models no longer have the docker on the top of the slide, it is a viable defensive or competition firearm, at a very reasonable price.

We are hoping Century Arms will provide us with a test firearm in the near future. Take a look at the video below, its a pretty good looking 9mm firearm,

 

Winchester USA Forged / 9mm Steel-Cased

I am not a big fan of steel-cased ammunition. It has never really been that much of a savings per round vs. the quality you have to deal with. Recently (Ammoman.com) was kind enough to reach out and provided some ammunition to us. One of the rounds sent to us for testing is the new Winchester USA Forged ammunition line in 9mm. The USA Forged line is Winchester’s attempt to get in on the cheap, high volume shooting steel-cased ammunition market, but offer a slightly better product than the foreign steel-cased ammunitions on the market.

Winchester USA Forged Steel-Cased 9mm Amminition
Winchester USA Forged Steel-Cased 9mm Amminition

There are some slight differences in the USA Forged line vs. other steel-cased ammunition. The Winchester USA Forged is 100% USA made and it uses an all lead bullet core with brass jacket (FMJ). There are no bi-metal components in the bullet. It has a non corrosive boxer primer and uses a clean burning powder, per the manufactures markings on the box.

I shot 200 rounds of Federal American Eagle 115grn FMJ before switching to the steel-cased USA Forged 115grn FMJ, just to compare how the steel functioned against a decent brass offering. I used a 19 year old Gen2 Glock 19 and a brand new H&K VP9 to test the Forged ammunition. Each firearm had 100 rounds of American Eagle though it before using the USA Forged ammunition.

068

Function/Reliability/Quality:

I shot 450 rounds of the Winchester USA Forged 9mm. As I was loading rounds I noticed how scraped up and ruff the steel casings were.  The Forged ammo does not have a lacquer coating or any kind of washed finish on it that I could see. Winchester says they have a proprietary surface treatment on the casings but the three boxes I received, most of the casings look pretty rough. The proprietary surface treatment is extremely inconsistent. It looks like plain exposed steel  most of the time. In several images and videos from some of the industry magazines out there, all the rounds looked the same, with a nice even casing coating.  This was definitely not the case for the boxes I received.

Inconsistent Surface Treatment on Casings / Rough
Inconsistent Surface Treatment on Casings / Rough

It took a little more elbow grease to load up magazines as they seemed to not want to slide in smoothly, due to the rough casings. Once loaded up, I quickly started dumping rounds down range at a rapid pace. I noticed a little more recoil from the Forged ammo. The steel casings were really flying out forcefully. I quickly burned through 85 rounds. On the 86th round I had a Failure to Extract (FTE) resulting in a Double Feed. I notice the casing was a quarter of the way out of the chamber and another round had fed into the back of it.  I cleared the magazine  and racked the slide to reengage the head of the un-extracted casing. Once the extractor and slide reengaged the lip of the casing I was unable to rack the slide to extract it.  I ended up having to smack the nose of the slide against the ground several times, to unseat the stuck casing enough to rack it out. The casing looked normal but you can see where the extractor slipped of the rim of the casing.

86th Rounds FTE/Double Feed
86th Rounds FTE/Double Feed
071
FTE/Double Feed

Except for the one (1) FTE resulting in a double feed, I had no other firing function issues. There were a few things that caught my attention as far as the quality of the individual rounds. At the end of the day these did not cause actual function issues but it did make the overall use and enjoyment of the Forged ammunition not as enjoyable. They are a little nit-picky but worth mentioning.

First; This ammunition is dirty. Dirty to handle and dirty shooting. It says clean burning powder is used and I was thinking, compared to what?, sticking my hands into a bag of coal dust. I’ve been to courses where I shot 1500 rounds in a day and my hands were not this dirty.  Second; There was a large noticeable powder cloud after firing each round and from time to time un-burned powder pieces would ignite in the air after firing rounds. It seemed to be as dirty shooting as any other steel-cased foreign ammo. Third; The above mentioned difficulty loading magazines. The rough, dirty and inconstantly coated  shell casings just made loading more difficult.

Support Hand
Support Hand
Primary / Shooting Hand
Primary / Shooting Hand

Accuracy:

I did not spend any time on in-depth formal accuracy testing.  The USA Forged ammunition is 115grn FMJ plinking ammo and I shot it all off hand. I took my target from 7 to 25 yards and all in between. All the hits were there and the round is going to hit what you’re shooting at.  At 25 yards I shot 20 rounds and they were all center mass within an extreme of  4 to 6 inches of center from each other, that’s good enough for me.

450 Rounds on Target
450 Rounds on Target

Final Thoughts:

Overall the Winchester USA Forged ammo worked. It does have a slight edge over foreign/imported steel-cased ammunition as far as the FMJ bullet is concerned. The best thing the Forged ammunition has going for it is the traditional FMJ bullet construction. I don’t think it is worth shooting over any brass-cased ammunition. In checking on Blazer Brass, PMC Bronze, Speer Lawman and American Eagle, all were between .21 and .26 cents per round depending quantity. I found the USA Forged is also going for .21 to .26 cents per round.  At these prices I don’t personally see that the Winchester steel-cased offering is saving any money. Thanks again to (Ammoman.com) for supplying the ammunition for the review.

Duncan.