Tag Archives: Training

Getting ready for a shooting class.

A few tips for getting ready for a shooting class.

First look at the required equipment list, the items listed there are probably good to bring.

Water/Electrolyte drinks. Many instructors will provide water but it is good to bring your own. Better to have too much in your vehicle, than not enough.

Lunch/snacks. I made the mistake of buying some chocolate power bars at a gas station, they all melted in the Florida heat. Your snacks or lunch need to be able to keep well during the class.

Ammo and mags. Often a pistol class will require 3 pistol magazines. If you have more than that, it can be rather helpful. It is also good to bring more ammo than recommended just in case you get to do more drills or practice then expected.

Slings for rifles, holsters for pistols. It is good to have a place to put your firearm when your not actively shooting.

If you need any supplies, order it early. I wanted to replace my old holster for the last class I took, so I ordered a holster about a month before the class. Unfortunately I did not receive the holster in time for the class.

Protection from the elements. Be ready for rain, mud, sun, etc. Last class I took I skipped the sunscreen and got badly sunburned because of that. Don’t make my mistake.

Show up early, and ready to learn.

I like big guns and I cannot lie…


 By  Cat Lindsay

I like big guns and I cannot lie…


This could be the song of my ladies!

At the last Ladies Introduction to Shooting class, while I only had one student, it was one of my best classes ever!

C, a 5’/100lb. 30-something spa owner, came to my class because her business has had 5 break-ins or attempted break-ins over the past 2 years. She no longer feels safe. While she does buzz her clients in and out, she fears someone barging in past one her customers. She was ready to learn the basics of handguns.

Though she had shot a gun once, in her youth, she came to me on Saturday as a clean slate. I actually prefer newbies, because there are no bad habits to break.

When we first started out, we used the replica training guns, as usual.  But, she soon wanted to touch & feel the real thing. For demo purposes, I always use my .45 Ruger SR1911, my 9mm S & W M & P Shield, my Taurus 608 .357 magnum, and one of MAGS rental guns, usually a large-frame 9mm Glock. This gives my students a wide variety of guns to feel.

With small hands, the double-stack Glock was too big.  She liked the feel of the Shield, but liked the weight of the Ruger & Taurus, because they “feel like real guns”.

After the classroom time (safety, how the guns & ammo work, loading magazines, clearing malfunctions, grip, stance, sights), we headed to the range.

The first gun she fired was the Taurus, shooting .38’s.  She liked the weight and being able to control such power. The Shield fit her hand better, but she didn’t like the recoil. She really liked the Ruger, the weight and all the safeties. She fired Will’s (MAGS employee) Gen 4 Glock 19, but had malfunctions. I showed her the difference between locking out and REALLY locking out, and she had better results. The last gun she fired was a Ruger SR .22 (I know we should have started with this gun, but it was a rental and we had to wait). She did not care for the optics.

So at the conclusion of the class, I asked her what her favorite gun was and she said the Taurus revolver and the Ruger 1911 because they felt like real guns. I told her that bigger, heavier guns were great for home/business defense.

BTW, she will be taking the CCW class in later this month!

All about those sights…


By Cat Lindsay

At the last 2-hour weekly training class (MAGS Indoor Shooting Range), it was all about the sights.

I know there are alot of “point” shooters out there, which is fine shooting from retention from 0-5 yards, but if my arm is in lock-out, my eyes are looking for the sights!

After warm up drills (2 to the body, 1 to the head, then the two combined{failure drill}), we shot drills first with the strong hand, then switched to the off hand, making sure to keep the sights in focus during the transition (harder than you think!). Some shots we did on the same spot, some were from right to left, while some were from lower corner to upper corner. We did these drills from 3-10 yards away from the targets.

With shooting one-handed, the stance, grip, and lock-out stays the same as with shooting with both hands. There is a tendency to want to be too perfect with the shot, which leads to muscle fatigue, then slapping the trigger. As soon as any part of the front sight can be seen through the rear sight, on the target, the trigger needs to be released.

I occasionally turned on the safety while transitioning from right hand to left hand, so lost some time on some of the drills. If I ran empty, I reloaded one handed (release magazine, pinch gun between knees, reload, rack slide on belt). At the end of the night, we went back to both hands and it was so much easier!

Speaking of sights, I have been really liking the Trijicon HD Night Sights Mike installed 3 weeks ago. I love the big orange photoluminescent front dot and the “U” shaped back sight cutout. I find that I can pick up my sights quicker with the contrast. I did the one-handed drills with my Crimson Trace laser turned off and felt I didn’t lose much speed. The flat-fronted rear sight made racking the slide much easier, one-handed, as opposed to the slope-front one I had previously. The glow at night on my headboard is also very comforting. These night sights are well worth the cost.

So, the next time you’re on the range, take some time to work on sighted, one-hand drills. You never know when knowing this skill may come in handy for personal protection.

Step Outside Your Comfort Zone

By Cat Lindsay

Last Saturday at MAGS Indoor Shooting, we did CCW 2-year renewals and 4-year requals. For some people, this is the ONLY time they shoot a gun, which is both scary (would you REALLY know what to do in a life or death situation?) and sad (training is fun!).

A guy asked to borrow my Ruger SR1911. I asked him if he familiar this style of weapon and he said “Yes, I shot one 2 years ago when I got my license (he carries a .38 revolver). He loaded the bullets in the magazine backward (which I fixed), but he did qualify, and I scored half a box of ammo!

One lady, T, who was there for her 4-year renewal, initially got her license because, as a real estate agent, she did not feel safe showing property in her rural area. She carries a .380 semi-auto in a purse (future article), but chose to qualify with a .45 semi-auto and a .45 revolver. We find that a lot of students will do this, since it means purchasing only one box of ammo(25 rounds to qualify).

T initially qualified with a .45 semi-auto and a .38 revolver. With a renewal, one has the opportuniy to qualify with whatever gun they wish (unlike the 2-year), so she was talked into trying the .45 Taurus Judge. She was quite intimidated with the size and weight (as compared to her .380), but was willing to give it a try.

After showing her the proper grip, finding the sights, and how to cock the hammer, she dry fired a few times. Before firing live rounds, I showed her the proper stance. Her first shot was in the head(shots are to be placed below the head on a “Q” target). While she was surprised at the noise, she stated that the recoil was very controllable. While she did miss her 5th round (she admitted she was not watching her sights), the rest of the 20 rounds went in the center. Afterwards, she had a huge grin on her face, feeling very confident in her ability to control any gun she wishes to shoot.

T also qualified with a Sig Sauer .45 semi-auto. She did say she found it much easier to shoot after having learned the proper grip and stance.

Though T may never shoot or carry a .45 revolver, she now knows that there is not limit to what she can learn and how far she can go in her Warrior Womandom!


Article by Mark Hatfield.

A little while back I repeated a course which was this time given by Rick Klopp representing Suarez International, the course was Fighting in Structures. It was my first class with him and I would attend one by him again. The presentation had changed from when I had taken it two or three years earlier under another of the S.I. instructors. With the special facilities of Double Tap the course could be done differently, we did less action than previously but more time on the ‘why’ of what we were going to do and then analyzing what we had actually done.

Double Tap is a privately owned and constructed facility which has an outdoor range designed for tactical training but the heart of the facility is the ‘shoot house’. The ‘shoot house’ is not a live fire facility but designed for use with Airsoft, Simunitions, or even paintball if desired. It is a complete multiroom, two story facility contained within a warehouse type building. There are movable interior walls designed such that the floor plan can be easily changed. There are closets, furniture, and a staircase to negotiate. The lighting can be completely controlled so if you want to simulate approaching the structure at night and room clearing by flashlight, this can be done at any time of the actual day or night. Further, the facility has its own camera and video system so most of the action can be captured then reviewed at the control room. This is a big plus for determining what may have gone wrong or right. There are even ‘catwalks’ for observers if desired.

Another ‘plus’ is the classroom and yet another are the ‘bunkhouses’. Quarters are simple, clean, and have microwave ovens and hot showers. There are both male and female sections. Bedding is provided. This is all in the same building as the shoot house making for great convenience and the cost per night to stay there is a huge savings over that of a hotel. If all students of an activity bunk on site then they can take breaks or use the facility at any time around the clock. This is a big advantage compared to having to stop at five or six in the evening then meeting up again in the morning.

I got to spend some time with the family who owns and operates the facility. They can assist with guidance on how to use the structure and can assist with video or leave you alone as you desire. They built this themselves and with no prior experience with such designs. They are due much credit for this creation.

Most people who are not military or police SWAT team members never get to train in facilities like this. Do it if you have the chance. I can strongly recommend this facility and the class. Note, the course attended, instructor, and the sponsor are independent of the Double Tap facility.

Fox News 10 – Civil Rights Activist Experiences Shoot or Don’t Shoot Scenarios

I was forwarded this via email from the local 3 Gun match director Mark Meek. I think a good many people don’t realize how quickly a situation can escalate, and how hard it can be it identify the good guys from the bad guys. Many anti-gun people believe that their mantle of innocence is a shield from violence. That belief leads to impotent inaction which can cost them, or their loved ones their lives.


Article by Mark Hatfield.

I was the first to shoot a hostage.

Not that I shot at the wrong person, it was that I hit the hostage while attempting to hit only the hostage taker behind him/her. It was probably a survivable wound but would have been crippling. Thankfully these were only cardboard targets.

A few other things happened during these sessions. I had emptied my handgun and reloaded with a fresh magazine. As I removed my support hand I saw the new magazine fall out of the gun. I simply grabbed another spare mag and loaded the gun, that was much better than getting on the ground to get the fallen mag. The fallen mag might have been irretrievable for a number of reasons, falling into water, an unreachable space, be unseen, or even come apart upon impact. Much better to have more than one spare mag.

On another drill we shot one handed until the handgun was empty, reloaded, transferred the gun to the other hand and again fired until empty, reloaded again then moved to the next station. After emptying the gun the second time, I transferred it back to my dominant hand, or rather I attempted to, I dropped it. When I realized the gun was going, I, for only a fragment of a second, thought of going to the ground after it but instead my other hand drew my other identical gun and had it pointed downrange, possibly by the time the other gun hit the ground. It would not be correct to say that I was glad I had the second gun and more so that I had trained with it, I really didn’t have any such feeling. It was rather that there had been a problem and I had successfully resolved it.

Some people, even rather experienced shooters, when under pressure often forgot to operate the safety before they attempted to fire their rifles. Some, though experienced, had never fired their rifles from the ‘wrong’ shoulder, many had never before fired their rifles using only one arm. Often there were multiple targets, the defender had to move between different locations of cover, to find the right angle or height for which to engage any one or two targets then change to do the others. Defenders would forget that there were multiple targets which were threatening them from different angles. When trying to find the best position from which to shoot one particular target while staying behind cover from that attacker, the defenders forgot about keeping cover between themselves and the other attackers.

Physical fitness matters. Too many people want to ignore that. This was not a physical course, not physically demanding, especially compared to some. But, for best ‘results’, one needs to be able to move short distances quickly, to be able to get up and down, change positions, and adapt as needed. Never forget that a fight, any fight, will not be compatible with whatever skills you practice, what you train for, or what you predict might likely happen. The fight will be what ever it is and you don’t get to choose how it will start or under what conditions. Even a modest amount of physical fitness training can make a huge difference over doing no training at all.

One man, a Federal ‘First Responder’, wore not just his complete gear and equipment but body armor, this significant amount of kit was what he wore daily on his job. Despite the heat and activity he trained in and with the equipment he would most likely be wearing if he needed to do what he was hired to do. This is a sign of a wise man.

Doing anything under stress, even just a little pressure, and your performance can change, it can be very different from just casual practice. The stressors of such drills or even competition is much less than that of an actual event of deadly force. However, after learning a skill, practicing it under stress helps to ‘inoculate’ one to better perform when the stress is not artificial. This includes decision making under pressure, an attribute which is even more important than just skills.

Even a little practice of something, a little preparation makes a huge improvement on how a person can handle stressors and problems of many types. ‘Make your mistakes here’, Do something here now for the first time rather than trying to figure it out for the first time when life depends on it, was the theme of this course. This anti-terrorism aspect of this offering by John Farnam was not about shooting. One could not just shoot fast and accurately, one had to think, decide, adapt, and act, and do it quickly.

John Farnam is known and teaches internationally, his Defense Training International webpage can be easily found. I recommend you sign up to receive his random ‘quips’.