Surplus Milkor M32 Multishot Grenade Launchers for sale

https://www.machineguncentral.com/ViewDetails.aspx?p=2512–b2b01f92-3540-4206-a27a-bd2575391936

Milkor is selling off 53 M32 Grenade Launchers there were Army trade-ins. So for a mear $15,000 you can own one too. At that price, might as well get two, one for each hand.

Shame these are not the newer, upgrade, M32A1s. Those have a 3 inch shorter barrel, and are upgraded to be able to take higher pressure rounds.

Sometimes I think I am the only person in the world that isn’t in love with the M32. My biggest complaint is that it is large and bulky. It is twice the weight of a M79, and about 4 times the weight of a M203 or M320. Whom ever carries the M32 will likely have another weapon as a primary weapon. I didn’t care for the design of the stock and the optic. The stock pivots to allow for the high angle necessary for farther shots. The stock on the one I used would flop around. I really didn’t like that. In photos and videos I’ve seen of others, the stock seems to lock in various angles, so that might have just been an issue with the unit my platoon had. The optic was good, but not great. It was just a red dot you manually had to adjust for range. I had a few complaints about the optic. First it relies on the user making an accurate range estimation. If the user is wrong they have to adjust the sight again. Secondly when firing at near maximium ranges, the optic is tilted nearly 45 degrees and is aimed right at the barrel. You then won’t be able to see the target through the optic and then have to keep both eyes open to do something like the Bindon Aiming Concept to transpose the dot and the target together.

For example, in the above pictures, you see how a 40mm is nearly at 45 degrees for a 400m shot. Using an offset sight or a multi-ranging holographic sight like the discontinued M40GL allows for easy of aiming while aiming. Putting the optic right over the barrel ended up with you pointing the optic right at the barrel.

My last gripe is a training and use issue. In the Corps, I never saw anyone able to really use one fast or efficiently. I never saw anything that made me believe that the average infantryman was going to actually load and fire 18 rounds a minute through one of these. Loading always seemed slow and awkward. But to be fair, we received these mid deployment and there was never any real training time given to them.

Still, it is a very cool weapons system. One of the biggest merits we found with it was that due to its’ spring loaded cylinder, you could advance it to the chamber you want. We sometimes loaded up (in order) 2 green star clusters, 2 parachute flares, and 2 HEDP rounds. When we had to warn locals or do escalation of force, the Marine with the M32 could easily do a snap shot firing off a green star cluster to gain people’s attention and warn them. If instead, it was night time and we needed light, they could advance the cylinder twice and fired off a parachute flare or two. Should we need the indirect fire or to strike an area target, the cylinder would be advanced to the fragmentation rounds to lay down some death.

At night, it would a whole lot of fun, and kinda handy to be able to spin in place while firing parachute flares in order to light up the sky with a new constellation, albeit a temporary one.

Still, from my experience there was nothing we did with the M32 that we didn’t do as well with the M203. We certainly didn’t miss it when we turned it back in before the end of our deployment.

All that said. If I had the money to burn, I’d buy one of these surplus guns. Hell, I’d buy two, one for each hand.

Aimpoint H1 Micro, after 5 Years of use

I have always been a strong proponent of Aimpoint sights. Really, we all have been at looserounds. You cannot go wrong choosing any of the Aimpoint models that are currently available or have been previously available. When I worked for my hometown police department, I was the only officer with an Aimpoint, I carried an ML2 (purchased 2003). I never had an issue with my ML2, it just kept going strong year after year. I wrote an article for looserounds several years ago about that Aimpoint ML2 after running it on rifles for ten (10) years. (http://looserounds.com/2013/04/23/my-aimpoint-ml2-a-decade-in-use/). Since then I have used several other Aimpoints Red Dot Sight (RDS) optics.

There are a lot of micro RDS optics on the market and numerous are less expensive than Aimpoint. So, I want to put this article in perspective for you.  Just like my previous article on the Aimpoint ML2, I am talking about a serious personal defense, military or law enforcement / duty use, micro RDS optic. Something you can trust your life or others lives on. While other RDS optics might serve you just as well, Aimpoint is known for its quality. Aimpoint has the quality and quantity that has served in military and law enforcement units in extreme environments for decades.

PSA 10.5 Pistol w/Aimpoint H1. ADM Mount

In October 2013 and January 2014, I purchased two Aimpoint H1 RDS optics. These Ampoint H1’s have a 4MOA dot and are currently out of production. Aimpoint still makes the H1 micro but it is only offered in a 2MOA dot. When you are testing a RDS sight over several years, it may go out of production, but there are a lot of that sight still out there. Also it gives you an idea of how current models will perform.

I put brand new batteries in the H1’s when I purchased them and set them on setting eight (8). Aimpoint states that on setting eight (8) the micro’s should run for 50,000 hours or five (5) years on the same battery. I would say this is very accurate as I have had both my Aimpoints on over the five (5) years.   

Aimpoint H1/Larue Mount/Colt 6720
Aimpoint H1/Scalarworks Mount

Now you may be thinking, I didn’t continually leave the H1’s on and I never used them in any hard use. The H1 micro’s have seen more rounds on rifles than I even know. They have been through countless training classes, schools and testing at looserounds. I have also tested the H1’s on several different mounts over the years. I have used American Defense Manufacturing (ADM) mounts, Daniel Defense mounts, LaRue Tactical Mounts and Scalarworks Mounts.  You will see these mounts throughout the pictures in the article.  Since the batteries have been on for 5-1/2 years they probably have over 55,000 hours run time on them.

H1’s on 6920 & 6720 / Larue & Scalarworks

For the past five (5) years my pair of Aimpoint H1 mico’s have been my home defense optics, on various rifles, Colt (LE6920s, AR6720s and currently LE6960). I have also run them on a few S&W M&P15-22s and currently on a Palmetto State Armory (PSA) 10.5″ AR15 Pistol.  While I have kept both H1’s on setting eight (8) the entire time I have had them, I have bumped the setting up and down during use, depending on lighting conditions.  During bright days on the range I have had to bump the setting up to eleven (11), or one louder it you know what I mean. I have also run the H1’s on lower settings to sight the optics in on other rifles.  I find that dialing down the sight while sighting in RDS optics, gives you a more accurate Point of Impact (POI) on the sight. After shooting or sighting in, I default the sights back to setting eight (8). I find that setting eight (8) is the best all around setting for most lighting situations.

S&W M&P15-22 / Aimpoint H1 ADM Mount

 

Conclusions:

According to Aimpoint, the Aimpoint H1’s have a 50,000 hour battery life, (roughly Five years). Over the last 5-1/2 years the Aimpoint H1’s have stood up to every day work/use, countless range days, carbine course schools (on several different rifles), and looserounds firearms testing for articles, on the original batteries. Now that I have run them this long on the original batteries, I will change them out. I would suggest that you change out the battery every year just to be safe. I have said this before and it is always confirmed, Aimpoint is the only red dot optic I will ever use for professional or serious personal defense use. If you purchase one of the newer Aimpoint models, (i.e. PRO, M4, M4S, H1 – H2 or T1 – T2), with battery lives of 30,000 to 80,000 hours, these will last you a lifetime. There is no other optic that you can bet your life on and gives you that comfort that it will work every time you need it.       

Duncan.      

What is the measure of a good rifleman?

Last night I ran across another thread over at Arfcom that I thought posed an interesting question. The poster asked members what skill level and standards do they think makes some one a competent and skilled “rifleman.” AS you know, this is an evergreen subject for me. For years I have pondered on this question and tried to have a framework of what i think makes some one a skilled rifleman. Below I am going to share some of the comments from the various worthies who gave their two cents in the thread for your consideration and discussion.

Before we get to that I wanted to set some parameters real quick for some reasons we will talk about in a second part. In this case lets think of Rifleman to be understood as skill with a rifle and ability to hit a target with a variety of rifles or even carbines. This ( for now) will not include skills or training that only defines the rifleman as a combat infantryman, i.e. small unit tactics etc. Also no military qual award that designates one a “rifleman” nor the use of an NRA skill level for something like service rifle or any highpower shooting sport. At least for now. In part 2 of this, I will give you my ideas of what abilities I personally consider a “rifleman” to have. SO lets take a look at some arfcom responses and as always I am eager to hear your thoughts in the comments because this time I will probably add them to my own in part 2.

So here we start off with the original posted questions


“What metrics would you use to gauge who is a good (not necessarily superior–but moderately accomplished/experienced) rifleman? Talking modern calibers here in a tight rifle. What position?

I’m thinking stuff like:
Be able to make a hit on a grapefruit, offhand, at 100yds.
Shoot a 2 MoA 3-shot group at 100yds from a field position given 2 attempts.
Hit a dinner plate at modest mid-range distances (say 400yds–something that requires correcting for elevation). “

1.” Be able to consistently hit a human torso sized target within the effective range of the rifle. Position is dictated by conditions (enemy fire, terrain etc) Prone is always superior for accuracy but not always available. “

2.” I like Pat McNamara’s BRM drill shot on B-8 centers at 50 yards.

5 rounds standing, 5 rounds sitting, 5 rounds kneeling, and 5 rounds prone. All four positions shot on their own target so you see what position needs work. No time limit.”

3.”Hitting a 10″ target at 100yd offhand.”

4.” From the Prone position, using Mark 1 Eyeball, I’ve hit ±85% (witnessed) at 400 yards”

5. “ Hitting what your aiming at makes for a good rifleman.” What seems like a smart ass remark really gets to the heart of the matter in my opinion

6. “Open sights. No scope. I’m classified as sharpshooter for NRA service rifle matches. 2 Bronze metals at Camp Perry for the Garand matches “ OK? very impressive for shooting known distance bullseye targets in a formalized sport with specialize equipment. Not so impressive in the real world though where targets are not in clearly marked lanes at exact known distance with sighter shots allowed before hand. Too specialized though I do respect the accomplishment.

7. ” Stop using groups for crying out loud.

What makes a “good” shooter? Hits on field targets in field conditions with no prior knowledge of course of fire and 1-2 rounds per target. Rating of “good” goes up as target size goes down and/or weapon system mismatch goes up. Higher rating for early hits. Start with torso targets and go smaller from there. Measures are relative to the conditions of the day and possible positions.

Some practical courses accomplish this measure, depending on level of gaming/comms/coordination possible between team members. Very few, if any “standardized” NRA games prepare shooters for these conditions, if you think about it. It’s really fun to watch top shooters with only NRA game or bench shooting experience show up to an event with these kind of practical penalties and get schooled by failure to read & adapt.
I like this guy’s thinking very much. Very much.


8. “My personal litmus test for myself is:

Pistol: Headshots at 10 yards, body shots on a 2/3rd USPSA steel target at 25 yards.
Rifle: Head shots at 25 yards, body shots offhand at 100 on a USPSA steel target, body shots prone out to point blank range on the 2/3rd size USPSA steel target.

This is what I consider the bare minimum of “good.” I know many folks who can do much better than that, but I also see even more people who struggle to shoot one foot groups at 50 from the bench with an AR15 ”

9. “From a “grab a gun” condition, be able to make the rifle ready and successfully engage a moving exposed human TGT within 50yds

* Same as above, on a partially exposed static human TGT after running to cover.

* First round hits on 18″ sils from kneeling position at 400yds

If you can do these things, you can fight, defend, and hunt – the 3 most practical uses for a rifle.

10. “Be able to use their weapon to it’s maximum effective range in reasonable conditions and realistic positions. “They should be able to outshoot their rifle as a rack-grade. “

11 .“If you’ve never been an NRA-classified shooter (high master, master, expert, etc.) then chances are you’re not really fully developed.

A good rifleman? You need a reliable rifle, ammo, a sling/carrying strap, and cleaning gear at a minimum. It doesn’t matter what kind of rifle it is really. It must be sighted in and you must have a basic idea of its zero and it’s trajectory. You must be able to shoot from the bench, standing, prone, sitting, and crouching”
..No.

12. “A rifleman -He has a rifle when and where it is needed.

He knows how to use his rifle.

He can hit what needs to be hit when it needs to be hit.

He can get to where he needs to be to be effective, that includes running (or skiing).

He does the above while the adrenaline is rushing, his heart is pumping out of his chest and his lungs are sucking for air.”

OK, so there is some selected comments. Some good ones in there. I will link to the thread if you want to see them all, It’s a short 2 page thread. Let’s hear your comments and we will pick this up tomorrow or the next day for part 2.

https://www.ar15.com/forums/General/What-is-the-measure-of-a-good-rifleman-/5-2212467/?page=1

Guest Post: How they’ll use the Trump Manouver to ban Standard Magazines in the Future

Reposted with permission. Originally Posted by MKSheppard on AR15.com

Maryland’s Bump Fire Stock ban bill had this language originally: 

“RAPID FIRE TRIGGER ACTIVATOR” MEANS ANY DEVICE, PART, OR COMBINATION OF DEVICES OR PARTS THAT IS DESIGNED AND FUNCTIONS TO ACCELERATE THE RATE OF FIRE OF A FIREARM BEYOND THE STANDARD RATE OF FIRE FOR FIREARMS THAT ARE NOT EQUIPPED WITH THAT DEVICE, PART, OR COMBINATION OF DEVICES OR PARTS ANY DEVICE, INCLUDING A REMOVABLE MANUAL OR POWER–DRIVEN ACTIVATING DEVICE, CONSTRUCTED SO THAT, WHEN INSTALLED IN OR ATTACHED TO A FIREARM: 

(I) THE RATE AT WHICH THE TRIGGER IS ACTIVATED INCREASES; OR 
(II) THE RATE OF FIRE INCREASES.

The following clause was struck out of the final bill apparently. 

ANY DEVICE, PART, OR COMBINATION OF DEVICES OR PARTS THAT IS DESIGNED AND FUNCTIONS TO ACCELERATE THE RATE OF FIRE OF A FIREARM BEYOND THE STANDARD RATE OF FIRE FOR FIREARMS THAT ARE NOT EQUIPPED WITH THAT DEVICE, PART, OR COMBINATION OF DEVICES OR PARTS

so that the text is now 

“RAPID FIRE TRIGGER ACTIVATOR” MEANS ANY DEVICE, INCLUDING A REMOVABLE MANUAL OR POWER–DRIVEN ACTIVATING DEVICE, CONSTRUCTED SO THAT, WHEN INSTALLED IN OR ATTACHED TO A FIREARM: 

(I) THE RATE AT WHICH THE TRIGGER IS ACTIVATED INCREASES; OR 
(II) THE RATE OF FIRE INCREASES

A judge noticed how restrictive this was: 

https://www.ammoland.com/2018/09/maryland-gun-owners-out-to-dry-gun-oil-ban/#axzz5lIEIh0to 

At the hearing, Judge Bredar remarked on the extreme vagueness of the State’s law as he demonstrated how GUN OIL being used to lubricate a BOLT-ACTION RIFLE to “increase” the “rate of fire” of the rifle because the action could be worked more efficiently, meaning the trigger could be manually activated faster than it could before using the GUN OIL.

By the way, while doing research for the next section; I noticed that ATF/Police personnel when they were asked by the media how long it took to empty a magazine, they used Jerry Mikulek speeds. 

If we assume someone can fire 1.5 shots a second and takes 3 seconds to change a magazine; then it breaks down as: 

5 Rd Magazine: 47 RPM (Cyclic) 
10 Rd Magazine: 62 RPM (Cyclic) 
20 Rd Magazine: 73 RPM (Cyclic) 
30 Rd Magazine: 78 RPM (Cyclic) 
60 Rd Magazine: 83 RPM (Cyclic) 
100 Rd Magazine: 86 RPM (Cyclic) 

You can see that by simply existing, a 30 round magazine increases the cyclic rate of fire of an AR15 from the 62 RPM of a 10 round magazine to 78 RPM. 

Therefore, it falls under the bump stock ban language used in Maryland: 

FUNCTIONS TO ACCELERATE THE RATE OF FIRE OF A FIREARM BEYOND THE STANDARD RATE OF FIRE FOR FIREARMS THAT ARE NOT EQUIPPED WITH THAT DEVICE, PART, OR COMBINATION OF DEVICES OR PARTS

and is banned. 

Let’s go a little bit further on how dangerous this is legally from the talk that the NRA put forth about how devices that simulate machine guns should be banned/regulated: 

Let’s assume that your AR15 fires 700 RPM (or 12 shots a second) as long as the magazine holds out and the trigger is depressed. 

Let’s assume that the media/ATF/Presidency (it’s going to go to a democrat eventually) play semantic games and pit: 

Zero Training Shooter, 1.5 shots a second semi automatically, 3 seconds to change magazine 
against 
Competition Shooter, 3 shots a second semi automatically, 1.5 seconds to change magazine 

Basically, they get an average untrained government worker with no experience in guns or automatic weapons, and put him behind a M4 Carbine with a giggle switch; and then test him against the best shooter from the JSOC units (MARSOC, SEALs, DELTA, etc) and using him with a 60 round drum as the baseline for semi auto weapons. 

The numbers crank out as: 

Automatic Rifle, Zero Training Shooter: 12 shots a second (720 RPM cyclic) , 3 seconds to change magazine. 
10 rd magazine: 156 RPM Average 
20 rd Magazine: 257 RPM average 
30 rd Magazine: 327 RPM average 
60 rd Drum: 450 RPM average 

Competition shooter, 3 shots a second, 1.5 seconds to change magazine. 
10 rd magazine: 124 RPM Average 
20 rd Magazine: 146 RPM average 
30 rd Magazine: 156 RPM average 
60 rd Drum: 167 RPM average 

You can see how there is a crossover if you limit the machine gun to 10~ round magazines; and put the best guy on the semi automatic; leading to situations where a semi automatic rifle with a so-called “Large Capacity Magazine” can put more bullets down range than a machine gun in the same amount of time (say, 60 seconds?). 

Thus, they get their “technically accurate” soundbite that gets disseminated on every network news show and all over Vox and The Trace about how 30 round magazines make semi autos equal in rate of fire to a machine gun! 

I’m no genius level intellect, and it took me only a few moments to come up with this attack mode — there are bound to be more that the antigunners will come up with. 

This is called “Red Teaming” where a group of players tries to poke holes in the plan of action — it appears that the anti gunners do a lot of “Red Team” counter study of their own proposals; witness how much smoother and slicker they are now, compared to the 1994 AWB. 

Meanwhile, the NRA is all hurf a derp, Wayne wants you to donate to get a chance to win this Kryptek truck! 

PS: When they use the Bump Stock attack mechanism to ban standard capacity magazines, they will lie to the general public and say that people can keep the magazines they have (grandfathering) as long as they register them.

What they won’t say is that the magazines since they are ruled as “converting a semi auto to simulate near machine gun sustained rates of fire”, they must be registered as destructive devices under the national firearms act, with each individual magazine being serialized and subject to a tax stamp. 

They’ve already done this — look at Washington state — they said one thing in the two sentence description of I-1639 on the ballot; “ban semi automatic assault weapons”, but when you looked at the 50 page text of the actual initative of I-1639, it defined “semi automatic assault weapon” as ANY semi automatic, even a 10/22. 

Happy dreams.

Colt Prototype ACR for sale.

I was stumbling around the web when I ran into this surprise:

Photo from Machine Gun Central, check them out.

A Colt ACR prototype for sale. If I recall correctly this was designed to shoot duplex ammunition, 1 bullets in each case to attempt to gain a higher hit ratio. Attempting a mechanical solution to a training problem.

This machine gun is listed for at for $75,000 over at Machine Gun Central.

It has some interesting features. You can see the precursor to the SOPMOD stock. It appears to have an early flat top upper with a built in rear sight that flips up. It is my understanding that the Army’s Quick Kill training liked having a continuous line between the rear sight and the front, to aim similar to using a shotgun rib. I believe that is why the hand guard it shaped at it is.

It is an interesting bit of history.