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Q&A

This is a LooseRounds.com Q&A session.  If you have a firearms related question please email it to [email protected]. We will post the your questions anonymously and give you our answers.

1.  Which Night sights for a Glock 19 would you recommend?

Duncan: There are several high quality sights on the market. Since Trijicon makes the Tritium lamps for most high-quality night sights you can’t go wrong with a company that has Trijicon labeled on the side of the sight. I have used several sights and recommend the following:

For all around general use that’s easy on the pocket book, Meprolight, Trijicon or Glock factory standard three dot night sights work fine. I have carried all three on different duty Glocks and they are very close in function. I prefer the Glock factory out of this group as they have lasted the longest and are quicker to acquire in low light. There is a down side that the Glock night sights have that the others don’t.  Sometimes if you are back lit, the angle of the rear sight can reflect light, washing the rear sight out.  This is rare but something to consider. Out of the three, the Glock factory sights have traditionally been the lowest in cost.

If price is something you are concerned with but you want to upgrade from the standard night sights, Ameriglo is a great option. Trijicon makes all of the laps for Ameriglo, and the Pro Operator or I-Dot Pro would serve you well.  For the price these sights are hard to beat and will outperform the standard night sights.

If you want to step it up, my favorite sights currently are the Trijicon HD night sites. I have these on a Gen2 Glock 19 and I can tell you they are great. One of the best sight I have ever used. They have a serrated rear operator sight and photo luminescent orange ring front sight. The profile is higher and the sights are faster and easier to acquire for me. You will pay for these but they are worth it.

Howard:  I personally prefer the Trijicon night sights, I like the sight picture and they have good customer service should you manage to break one.  The downside to Trijicon sights is that the white ring around the tritium vials will wear away quickly.  Meprolight sights will not lose the white rings, however they have less gap between the sides of the front sight and the rear sight.

2.  Shotgun or carbine , which is best for general patrol work for police?

Duncan: There are so many factors that come into play when thinking about what would be the best long gun in your patrol vehicle. Both a shotgun and a carbine have their place. What patrol environment you are in, (metro, small city, rural, or county), will also play a factor. Price is also a point you might want to look at, but when your life is on the line, price is not a real factor for me.

Shotgun: The old pump action shotgun like the 870 is a great shotgun. I can tell you the intimidation factor of a pump action shotgun will beat all other weapons. It’s awesome for felony stops or an alarm call on a house/business at night. I don’t know what it is but bad guys fear the shotgun. I have had suspects tell me to shoot them or come running at me when I had an AR-15 or handgun pointed at them. The downside to the shotgun is that it is heavy, large/cumbersome, has a limited range and it only holds a few rounds. Used properly it is very effective but after four rounds you have to reload or transition.

AR-15: The trend over the last decade has really been moving toward the AR-15 type patrol rifles. I think this probably is the best all around choice. My department replaced the Remington 870 with the Colt M4/LE6921 in about 2003. The availability and ease to obtain body armor and the increase in the number of high profile incidents where suspects were heavily armed, are both driving factors in carrying AR-15 patrol rifles.  It is light, small, easy to maneuver, accurate, has a large ammunition capacity and will defeat body armor. As a police officer you can use the kind of ammunition you want, unlike soldiers in the military. Open-tip match bullets and bonded bullets have made the AR-15 platform more accurate and effective with improved terminal ballistics.  The AR-15’s range will exceed what the average law enforcement officer will need. Six inch steel target at 100 yards, no problem. With the ability to put multiple accurate rounds on target in quick succession, it is the preferred choice. Add an Aimpoint and this is an almost unbeatable combination in my opinion.

These are only some of the factors that you must consider when looking at your patrol shotgun or carbine. For general patrol work I feel an AR-15 variant is best. For patrol work I would go with a 14.5″ or 16″ barrel. If you are a part time tac-team member or well trained officer, I would go with an 11.5″ barrel. One thing to think about is a good 870 is only a few hundred dollars, so if your department approves it why not have both.

3.  What is the best technique for shooting a pistol with a handheld flashlight?

Duncan:  The best technique is the one that gives your firearm the most stable shooting position with the light you’re using. There are so many lights out there that this all depends on what particular hand held light you have.  For me, I always carried a larger flashlight. I really liked the Streamlight SL20X and Stinger series.

I found with most lights The Harries Technique works extremely well: Hold the flashlight in your support hand, like an ice pick.  Come underneath your firearm/dominant hand, then hook your wrist up and put the back of your hands together. Now your weapon hand is resting on your support hand wrist and the back of your hands are together. Apply a little pressure by pushing the backs of your hands together to make a stable shooting platform.

There are several other advanced techniques, (FBI, Surefire, Neck Index), most of them involve one hand shooting. The Harries Technique gets you very close to two handed shooting and works with flashlights that have end-cap or side pressure switches. The Harries is one of the most common techniques taught in Law Enforcement Academies.

Howard:  Before I learned any proper techniques, I played around with several ways to do this.  I found for me that I ended up using the the Harries Technique.  I also use a similar method for using a handheld flashlight with the AR15, my left wrist is placed on the mag well pulling the rifle into my shoulder and helping support it.

4.  What backup gun for police?

Duncan:  Once again there are so many things to think about when looking at a backup firearm. First you need to pick a quality firearm, el cheapo .25 auto or .32 auto is not going to cut it. Ideally a backup that carries your same duty ammo and magazine capability is best. For example: a Glock 27 to a Glock 22, or M&P compact to M&P full size. The operation/manipulation and familiarity of these compacts are the same as your duty weapon. If this backup is mounted in your patrol car or on your ankle you can use your full capacity duty mags for reloads. This is a huge plus (+) in a prolonged firefight.

I have always been a smaller guy, I tried to carry a Glock 27 on my ankle, but it was just too big and heavy for me. In this case a very reliable J frame revolver is a very good option. For Example: S&W 642 airweight or 340PD airlite. These J frame revolvers can weigh as little as 11 oz. While not compatible with your duty gun, in most cases this is a last ditch emergency pull. I personally would not want to carry anything smaller than a 9mm/.38 special/.357 mag round. If it is an emergency situation I want to make sure my ammunition has the ability to put the threat down. Having said that .380 has come a long way and if you want something small in an automatic this is another option to consider. Example: Sig P238.

I can never state this enough, no matter what you choose, training and practice are key. You must have the ability to put effective rounds on target with your backup, especially if your backup is not compatible with your duty weapon. You might only have those five rounds in the J frame to get the job done.

5.  Please find below an article that we at Onlinecolleges.net think you and your readers would be interested in reading, the post “12 College Campuses Caught Up in the Gun Control Debate” (http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2012/10/03/12-college-campuses-caught-up-in-the-gun-control-debate/). We’d appreciate it if you would take a look at the article and consider sharing it with your readers.

LooseRounds.com:  Sure.

My Survival Gear Part 1

Since we have opened up a new section of the website for survival and prepping, I decided it would be  a good time to talk about my “get home” bag, or “bug out” bag.

My pack goes with me whenever I travel and stays in my jeep or whatever vehicle I am in. Depending on the time of year or how far I am going, I will change some items or go to a larger backpack.

If you click on the image, you will see a larger picture of most of what goes into my pack during the spring/summer/fall seasons. Something will change depending, but most of this is standard.  The back Pack is the USMC issued ILBE assault 3 day pack.  It has a main storage area, and outside storage and a pocket in the rear for a water bladder like the Camelbak.  I use the USMCSource WXP for water since the pack was made with this system in mind.

The main gear consists of the following items.

Two USMC  ground tarps. They snap together and are water proof. Can be used as a shelter half each or a water proof bed roll.

Two USMC poncho liners for sleeping or shade etc.

Two seal line water proof storage compression bags.

Two pair of cushioned Smarwool socks with silver lined sock liners.

One Nalgene bottle with titanium spork and nalgene canteen cup for cooking or mixing.

One water proof plastic container for cell phones or electronics.

Parachute flare

Folding knife

One fleece watch cap.

Two surefire battery holders with batteries and extra bulbs.

100 ft  550 cord

surefire  6p ( two)

streamlight pen light

Five chemical lights

Kbar knife

Flint and steel

Then I have a few 1 gallon ziplock bags with handy items. Heavy rubber bands, zipties, more batteries ( lithium) lighters ( 3) candles ( 2 ) Swiss army knife and Leatherman multitool. It also contains some medicine and some small 1st aid items.

Also I have a few kits given to railroad workers that are sealed up and contain grbage bags, handiwipes, toillete paper and hand cleaner.

Above are a few items I have found a lot of use from. An old Swiss army knife I bought with the first paycheck in my life many years ago with my name engraved on it by an old friend of mine (now since deceased) and two titanium pry-bars.

Above is my individual first-aid kit (IFAK). This is listed alone because I attach it to the outside of the pack to get to faster without digging. It is a pretty standard military kit with a few extras thrown in. I changed it by taking out anything i did not know how to use since it would just increase the risk of me harming myself.  I am not going to break it down or recommend what you put in yours because I am not a doctor and it is best you learn about this kind of thing from pros.

One thing that I add to the pack if I travel very far is a blow up thermarest pad for sleeping, It rolls up nice and has elastic rope to hold it together. The ILBE assault pack has two buckled straps that will hold it to either side nice and snug.

I did not show the food I add to the pack because it changes pretty often to make sure it stays fresh. Usually it is a combination of MREs, mountain house entrees and a few smaller cans of stuff added in.  In all, it’s about 3 days of food for the warm months.

Here is is all stuffed into the pack without the therma rest. I keep two carabiners on the pack just in case I need to lash something to it.

The pack does not contain any fighting items because it is not a fighting load carrier. It is for getting home cross-country.  Anything i need to defend myself with goes on my person.

This is what would be on my person if I needed to leave my vehicle and go cross country towards home. Some stays in the car until I need it, but the gun, mags, watch, knife and light are always with me. The signal panel,chem lights, lighter and extra AR mag would be added if I was forced to leave my vehicle.  This changes slightly from time of year or time of day/night.  The Gov model is my deep cover CCW pistol, but since buying the excellent Darkstar gear Kydex holster, I have taken to carrying my 1911 colt railgun with surefire x300 as my main CCW pistol.

For me, I feel these are the most important things to have and should not leave my person. I think I could reasonably escape most situations with just thins bit of gear as long as I could get back to my main pack or at least some water somewhere.  If not, then its unlikely I could have made it anyway.  The AR15 mag is added to the belt if things are bad enough to need it and the trunk AR15 is taken along.  I keep the AR15 in a ADIDAS sporting bag that I have shown before.

Next I will show the upgrade in clothing for winter months and longer travel.

Q&A 3

This is a LooseRounds.com Q&A session.  If you have a firearms related question please email it to [email protected]. We will post the your questions anonymously and give you our answers.

1.  Sirs,

A friend and I are working up loads for his hunting rifle and during the discussions a question came up that neither of us have seen addressed. When shooting (right-handed) for group from a bench, with the rifle supported by sandbags at the forearm and butstock, what is the best position for the left hand on the rifle?

Is it important to control the forearm laterally with a hand on the forearm? I recently watched a video showing a rifle with a bipod and butstock monopod being fired with the left hand on the monopod controlling vertical sight movement. The bipod controls the lateral movement but maybe not so much during recoil.

We’d like to read your opinions (and reasons) on this question.

Thanks. We enjoy your site.

Howard:  Normally the forend/handguards are on a rest/sandbags/bipod, and the left hand is used to adjust the rear bag/monopod for elevation.

Sometimes for expediences the left hand is put directly under the stock(often as a fist) and clenched or unclenched to hold up the butt of the rifle.
Just resting the front of the rifle on a rest helps steady the rifle a great deal, but when the rear of the rifle is resting on something as well, the rifle is far more stable.  When using something like a competition bench rest all adjustments are done from the front rest.  However for most of us, the front rest we use(bipod, sandbag, wooden block, backpack, enemy cadaver, etc) is not so adjustable.  So we pivot the rifle on the front rest for left and right, and we lift or drop the buttstock for up and down.  Using a rear rest gives that additional stability, and the left hand(for a right handed shooter) is used to control/adjust that rear rest.
2.  I am trying to help new hunters as well as others to select and purchase the right optics for the type of gun as well as the type of hunting or shooting they enjoy doing. The right equipment is a sure way to be a safe and happy hunter.
Shawn:  For medium to large size game:  For deep woods or anything other then open plains something like a 1-5x.  If you are in an area like out west where you have longer distances, something like a 3.5-10x.  Preference for 10x or under so you don’t have to worry about adjusting parallax because you don’t have time to fiddle with it in the field.  No bigger then a 40mm objective lens as long as the optic is clear, because anything much bigger doesn’t really make anything much bright.  Larger just adds weight and size that makes the rifle top heavy.  Stay away from scopes with friction plate elevation or windage adjustments, you want to be able to zero as precisely as you can.  For varmint hunting, I prefer 12-20 magnification scopes with target turrets with positive clicks with a click value of no less then 1/4 MOA.  Has to be adjustable for focusing and objective lens size doesn’t really matter, go as large as you like.  For long range varminting, scope base and ring selection is just as important as the scope.
Howard:  The problem with picking a scope is that there are so many options and personal preferences.  Thicker reticles can be faster to pick up, but may cover a target at longer ranges.  Too much magnification can make it slower to acquire targets.  Adjustments values need to be appropriate for the type of precision necessary for the type of shooting.  I think a decent 3-9 would cover the average deer or hog hunters needs.
Optics are very much a personal preference.  LooseRounds.com always recommends that you always try to buy the highest quality optics you can afford.
3.  does the colt rail gun have a throated barrel?
Shawn:  Yes and a polished feed ramp.
4.  How did the Unertl scope hold up in tropical climate?
Shawn:  The Unertl in the war in Vietnam did tend to fog up at time in the rainy season.  But this isn’t the flaw that it seems to be, John Unertl designed the scope to be very easy to repair and worked on by the end user.  So the Unertl is easily taken apart and can be dried off or wiped dry and cleaned with simple tools.  Even the cross hair was designed to be replaceable by the end user with anything suitable in the event of failure.  With those in mind, you could seal the scope yourself, at the cost of no longer being able to do field expedient disassemble.  Other then that, the Unertl scope was very difficult to break or render unusable.
5.  can i own a krinkov if it has no stock
Howard:  You can own an AK pistol.  For example the Draco and the SLR106-47.  However I do not recommend this setup as they are heavy and awkward.  Shooting them with out a sling for stabilization is also awkward, best used for turning money(ammo) into noise.
6.  Is the Colt 901 an AR10
Howard:  No.  While the 901 is a 308 AR like the AR10s of old.  However now the term AR10 refers specifically to the trademarked Armalite (Eagle) brand .308 rifles.  The Armalites mostly use a M14 style mag.  Often you will see people refer to the lesser DPMS (Panther) .308s as AR10s.  These are not AR10s but a whole different model.  No one with a premium .308 such as a LaRue OBR, Colt 901, KAC EMC or SR25, GAP, LWRC REPR, POF, etc call their .308 variant an AR10.  Only people who have purchased the cheaper DPMS tend to want to call it by a most expensive models trademark.
7.  What ammo does the USMC scout snipers use?
Shawn:  Ammo used in all USMC sniper system is the M118LR.  175 grain Serria hollow point boat tail bullet and Lake City match brass.  Of course, other loads like ball or tracer can be used in specialty or emergencies situations.
8.  Will the Magpul BAD lever work on the Sig 716?
Howard:  No.
9.  Surefire 60 round magazine stripper clip?
Shawn:  The Surefire mags will accept stripper clips when loaded with a stripper clip guide.
Howard:  The Stripper clip guide is often called a “spoon”.

Q&A 2

This is the second session of LooseRounds.com Q&A.  If you have a firearms related question please email it to [email protected]. We will post the your questions anonymously and give you our answers.

Shawn and I thank Catherine Kim for the article she submitted and to thank Duncan Larsen for the articles he has submitted and for his help on our Facebook page.  We also appreciate the work CJ does as an editor on LooseRounds.com, he keeps us from looking as illiterate as we are.  Thanks also to Adam O’quinn for taking the 901 in action shots.

 

1.  How are the Surefire 60 round mags?

Howard:  Both Shawn and I own Surefire 60 round mags and we like them very much.  While we haven’t torture tested them, or run them very heavily, they appear to be good mags.  We recommend them, but be sure to test each mag before you rely on them.

2.  ar15 bolt face ring

Howard: Well that is not much of a question.  Normal wear on the bolt face may leave little pits, and a ring corresponding to the primer on the round.  If any pits extend into the firing pin channel, replace the bolt.

ARMY TM 9-1005-319-23&P and AIR FORCE TO 11W3-5-5-42 page 3-22 explain:

(a) Bolt faces with a cluster of pits which are touching or tightly grouped, covering an area measuring approximately 1,8 Inch across, will be rejected and replaced.

(b) Bolts which contain individual pits or a scattered pattern will not be cause for rejection.

(c) Bolts that contain pits extending Into the firing pin hole will not be rejected unless firing pin hole gaging check determines excess wear.

(d) Rings on the bolt face (machine tool marks), grooves, or ridges less than approximately 0.010 inch will not be cause for rejection.

3.  Winchester Model 70 used in Vietnam?

Shawn:  There were two types, one was the heavy barrel national match that had a target stock and a heavy barrel with a sporter stock.  The sporter stock model started off as sporters and then the Rifle Team Equipment (RTE) armorers added match heavy barrels.  Both were glass bedded and free floated by the RTE armors.

4.  Duty holster for 1911 with light

Shawn:  LooseRounds uses a Dark Star Gear holster kydex that can be used for IWB or outside carry.  Found it to be best of its type tested so far.

5.  scar 17 vs sig 716

Howard:  Right now you can get more parts and accessories for the Sig, such as cheap quality Magpul mags.  However as for company quality control and function out of the box, I would trust FN more then Sig.

6.  What cheap asian are good?

Howard:  Well, the following are optics and accessories are junk.  UTG, NcStar, Leapers, Counter Sniper.  Some of Tapco stuff is good, but much of it is junk.  ATI is similar with mixed quality items and plenty of junk.

Colt Rail Gun 4,000 round Test

Link to our Colt MARSOC  M45A1 Review  Part 1 and 2  to read about the M45A1 USMC 1911s accuracy and features

http://looserounds.com/2014/03/07/colt-m45a1-cqbp-usmc-1911-review-part-1/

http://looserounds.com/2014/03/10/accuracy-testing-the-colt-m45a1-marsoc-1911-part-2-review/

Since the news hit that Colt has won the contract to supply the USMC with the new 1911 pistol for MARSOC a lot of people have had a lot of questions regarding the rail gun. The pistol has been out since 09 and the only cosmetic  difference between the USMC contract gun is the FDE finish, the Novak night sights and a lanyard loop and the size and the M45A1 is a true picatinny rail along with a dual recoil spring system on the USMC gun.  The rail gun is stainless steel, frame and slide. The models with a dark finish are SS as well but with the extra coated finish.  There are a few nice touches on the rail gun that colt does not advertise for some reason, so I will break it down for you.

The rail gun comes with colt’s National match barrel. The barrel is slightly over sized at the muzzle end for a tighter fit for the barrel bushing and then slightly relieved. The slide has been dehorned for better handling and carry. Under the trigger guard is relieved for a higher grip and the front of the trigger guard is milled flat for those who like to put a finger in that spot. The pistol comes standard with Novak low mount combat sights and a Smith and Alexander upswept beaver tail grip safety. The rail gun I own came with the excellent STI ambi safety ( which has always been my personal favorite) but now comes with what may be the wilson combat ambi safety. The barrel and throat and chamber have all the normal upgrades that most 1911 buyers have a gunsmith do. This is a lot of upgrades on a pistol that is not advertised as being semi-custom, but they are there despite Colt not talking about it. You can confirm this all by reading some of the recent gun rag articles on the rail gun if you do not want to take my word for it.

The rail gun submitted for the new Marine special ops pistol has drawn a lot of attention lately from 1911 hater and lovers alike. The 1911 was tested to destruction in some cases and pictures have leaked out showing some cracking.  The rest of the story is not widely out at this point and the net being what it is, things have been taken out of context. The specs on testing show freezing the colt to 25 below for hours then heating to 100 degree then shooting and scraping ice off with knives. This is pretty harsh testing considering no service side arm would have anything like this happen or be shot that much.   But to try to understand what happens when a rail gun is used hard and to soothe the current rail gun owners frazzled nerves I decided to do a 4,000 round test of my own over the weekend.  My rail gun already had 10,000 rounds through it before I started the testing and I had an extra barrel ready to install anyway along with all the springs etc. So I decided I would use up whatever it had left to see what happened. I stopped at over 14,000 rounds through the gun when the USMC stopped at around 12,000.

I started off early in the morning and started shooting and loading mags as soon as they all run dry. I soon found out that I needed help with that so a friend got stuck loading mags for me to keep up the rate of fire and save time. With such a high rate of constant fire, it did not take long for me to burn myself on the gun. At times the gun got so hot to hold I had to place it in front of a large shop fan while reloading magazines

The gun would get so hot even the rear sight would be too hot to touch.

I did lube the gun every 300 rounds and I took the gun apart and wiped it off with a cotton towel. I did lube but I used no solvent or brush. This gave it a little time to cool down so I could hold it. By the time I had fired 2,000 rounds I had a few burns, blisters, and cuts myself. The web of my right hand is raw and my thumbs just plain hurt from loading. I am here to tell you–shooting this much non-stop is hard work. After a while I stopped trying to use training drills or shoot for group. I was so tired I just did not care. It truly is hard work and my ears still ring even with plugs in. The rear and front sight’s white dots became black from powder fouling covering them and my hands became filthy from the crud of so many fired rounds.

In all of this shooting I had three malfunctions. And I can tell you with 100 percent accuracy that it was mag related because it was the same mag, The culprit was a weak spring in a wilson combat 10 round magazine. Once I took it out of rotation I did not have another problem.  The only other problem (other than burning myself) was the grip screws would loosen up. I expected this since i have seen it before and have never loctited them. I normally do not approach this amount of shooting in one setting so I live with re tightening the grip screws once a year when I think about it.

After I finished up I took a few pictures of the gun. These are pictures of the rail gun after the last 1,000 rounds shot through it.

As you can see in the picture, the surefire x300 is so coated I could not see the light when I tried it. I thought the batteries died or the light took too much abuse until I wiped it off and tested it again. The light never got loose and helped tame the recoil slightly. I do not find .45 ACP hard kicking, but after that many rounds, it starts to wear on you.

Eventually the 1911 was so dirty, nothing on it was clean to the touch. Wiping it off every 1000 rounds helped but it seemed like I was still not able to keep up with it. Slip2000 showed itself to be truly excellent oil with a little GM grease added around the barrel link for when it got hot enough to bake off the light oil.

With the exception of the one wilson 10 round mag, all of the mags worked perfect. I only used colt factory 8 round mags and wilson combat 8-7 and 10 round mags along with 5 shooting star mags. The shooting star mags worked fine much to my surprise for they have ever been a source of frustration for me in the past despite their rep. I have 5 of the wilson 10 rounders and all but the one worked perfect.

I did not do any accuracy testing after the fact because to be honest, I was tired and do not think I had the ability to shoot a decent group even if the gun could. Sorry about that, but you are free to try it at home with your 1911.

I took the gun apart and looked it over with a magnifying glass I used to use to inspect diamonds at a Pawn shop and could find no crack or problems. The gun was a lot looser than it was the day before, but is fine. It is not so loose to make me worry or even care and I have 1911s looser than it is now that shoot better than I could hope for. I tried to take a picture showing the inside but they are too blurry owing to my 89 dollar camera not having a setting for super close up.

Above is a picture of my improvised target stand to keep from ruining my normal stuff. It is completely eaten  away from the amount of rounds through it. All 230 grain ball ammo.

Here is a target I used for the last 500 rounds. you can tell how tired I was by looking at the shots all over the target. He was dead already so I stopped caring. Getting those last rounds fired was a act akin to running through hell with gasoline underwear on.

For those of you with a rail gun or thinking of buying one, do not let the out of context pictures of cracked slides make you worry. I now have over 14,000 rounds total through my Colt and it is still working just like Colt meant it to. I do not advise abusing your personal 1911s to the point that I did. I some times part-time gunsmith 1911s locally and have enough Colt parts to build two 1911s except for stripped frames and slides so I can do this with little worry.  I have already replaced the barrel and springs so it is back to normal and I can go back to CCWing it.

It was a tough day. I am just glad I do not have to clean up after myself!!