Tag Archives: Surefire

Okay Industries “Surefeed” Magazines

Okay Industries has been around for along time.   Most people familiar with them know them from the surplus magazines sold at gun shows or stores.   They are a major supplier of M16/M4 magazines for the military.  In my opinion, they make the best milspec USGI aluminum standard mag.   I have used them over many many years and have never had one have even the smallest issue.   My friend and myself spent many hours driving mile and miles to find USGI mags after the ’94AWB became law and the Colt and Okay magazines were much sought after by us

One thing many people don’t know is that they likely already have an Okay ind, mag.     Okay was and probably still is the company that manufactures the Colt factory magazines in 30 and 20 round versions.  Years ago, colt rifle manuals fine print about reliability and warranty lawyer speak  always had the statement that Colt only garauntees their rifles to work completely reliable when using Colt and Okay Industry brand AR-15/M16/M4 magazines.   Why OKay? Because they made both.   Anyone in the military that carried a rifle/carbine as their primary job has probably seen plenty of the Okay brand mags.    Other than being issued some,  buying Colt magazines or surplus Okay mags on the civilian market, until recently it has not really been easy to buy brand new Okay brand mags.    Then recently, Okay has started finally selling their excellent USGI mags on the civilian market for everyone not in a communist state to purchase.  Rejoice!  The “Surefeed”  Okay magazines were born.

The mags come in the typical ziploc type plastic bag with nice backing with information and  instruction about the magazines.

The backs give the pertinent info  buyers may want to know abotu the specs of the magazines.

Not very often do you see a company care enough to include info like that in  plastic baggies for magazines.

The side of the mag bodies are marked with  the logo and you can see the milspec finish.

The mags being milspec, are up to the current specs and have the up to date tan follower to aid reliability  and to better feed the M855A1 service round.  The follower is the now standard anti-tilt type . The spring is stainless steel and made to the current milspec as well as he hard coat anodized finish.

The floorplates are marked with the new  logo and markings. A little different than the older Okay Industries markings but no change in quality.  I don’t know if this is the new logo for all mags or just the ones to be sold on the civilian market, I wouldn’t doubt  if it is just as change for marketing for non military buyers with the old markings and name still used for gov. contract magazines.  Either way  the important thing is that if you want to buy new, never used Okay mags you can.  I  paid $11 yankee green backs for these, A great deal as we have been living the salad days since obama left the throne. My advice is to buy  them in bulk and buy them often while the price is still down.

 

I tried these mags in  several ARs and they worked as expected.  All of my ARs are Colt which of course  has the magwells made to proper mil spec so its no shock the mags that are made to work  within that spec do.     I fired the mags, loaded them with stripper clips, loaded the mags with the lula loader and  they are living up to opinion I have of the older USGI surplus Okay mags I have.

I would not bother with a review of a plain old USGI magazine  normally but the Okay brand mags are a bit of an exception for me. I have always held a very high opinion of them and  always carefully horded the surplus examples I accumulated over the years.  Seeing them finally  brought  to the wider civilian market  was something I was very happen to see.,

The following branded USGI mags are the ones I stick with to ensure reliability.   I will save arguments over if they are all actually made by the same company for another time. I offer the list only as a way to reference the  USGI  I personally trust for 30 rounders.

  1. Colt
  2. Okay
  3. C Products
  4. NHMTG
  5. Adventure line

I do  often use and trust  the surefire 60 round magazines as well.

For completeness  non aluminum mags I use and trust are below.

  1. Lancer AWM ( the finest magazine on the market in my opinion)
  2. P-mag
  3.  DD  32 round magazines.

I also like the Pmag 40 round magazines.   That is  pretty much my short list of mags I use and trust  in the 30 rounds plus.     As for 20 rounders I have found most surplus military 20 round mags in good shape are reliable as well as the Pmag 20s and Pmag 10 rounders.

 

 

 

Voiding warranties and breaking Glock parts

Previously I wrote about my new Surefire light.  I didn’t like the sharp crenelation on the bezel so I threw it in a lathe and turned them off.  I really like how it turned out.

Pretty sure I voided my warranty doing that, but very worth it.

 

Recently I had someone ask me if I had a spare Glock 19 locking block.  Of course I did.  Turns out that they had a broken locking block in their Gen 3 G19.

The owner of that Glock has realized that their trigger pin had broken.  They continued to use the pistol with the broken trigger pin for at least several thousand rounds.  When they were going to replace the broken pin, they found that the 3rd pin had bent and the locking block was broken.  The pistol functioned fine during this time.

My guess is that the broken trigger pin allowed the locking block to flex a little until it failed.  The pins and locking block were replaced and the pistol is back in action.

On that note, when reassembling a 3rd gen Glock, the slide stop goes in after the third (top) pin.  The trigger pin is the last pin installed.  Failing to do so can leave the slide stop spring in the wrong place causing it to not function or to prematurely lock the slide open.

First Impressions – Surefire E2D Defender Ultra LED

There is a running joke between myself and a couple of friends of mine about how when you get a new flashlight, in the first few minutes of using it you end up shining it into your eyes to see how bright it is and end up regretting it.  I had this mind when I first got this light out of the package.  So I start turning it on and walking around my home to see how much it can light  up a room.  And, oh boy, it can light up a room.  Then with in the first few minutes of using the light, I manage to sweep it across a mirror right into my eyes.

I’d been looking for a new flash light to replace my old E2D Executive Defender.  I had really wanted a single cell smaller light similar to the Novatac lights I had.  I ended up picking up a new 600 lumen version of the E2D because it was on sale.  My old E2D had a KL4 head that had an output of about 100 lumens.  The first biggest difference between the new light and the older one is a massive difference in brightness.  There is just no comparing the tremendous increase in light output.

The new light on top, and my trusty old E2D on the bottom.  The newer model is a little longer.

When I saw the new pocket clip on the new light, I was pretty excited.  It has a double bend in it so you can use either side of the clip.  Unfortunately I found that this new clip has very little spring tension, and if you use it with the light end up the outside section then catches on your pocket or items in your pocket.  I ended up putting the new head on the old flash light body due to how lousy this new clip is.

Much to my dismay I found Surefire returned to the aggressive crenelations they used to use.  While I do suppose you could use these in a fight, I find they are best at cutting holes in your pockets.  I am probably going to blunt these with a file so I don’t end up having to replace all my pants.

The biggest thing is that the new light has a high 600 lumen mode, and a low 5 lumen mode.  I would really like that, except that it alternates between them.  Using this light for a week, I found that every time I went to use it, it would start on the wrong brightest.  (While it should be a 50% chance to be right, I managed to have be 100% all the time)  Every time I tried to use it in the middle of the night it started on 600 lumens, each time I tried to use it to check out machinery during the day, it would start on 5.  So it becomes an annoyance to have to toggle EVERY time I go to use it to get it into the right brightness mode.

Now if you liked to strobe a flashlight an an attempt to blind and disorientate a target, you will find this light completely useless for that.  Due to the alternating brightness setting, every other flash is far from blinding and then sometimes it will stay on the 5 lumen brightness as you attempt to strobe.

Had I paid full price for this new Surefire light I would have been rather disappointed.  But for a discounted unit, I can make it work for me.  I wouldn’t recommend it for “tactical” use due to the nature of the dual output function, but it will make for a handy every day carry utility light.

First impressions of the Ruger Precision Rifle

Shortly after the Ruger Precision Rifle (RPR) first came out, a close friend of mine asked me what I thought about it.  I’m pretty sure my response was something like, “Ruger is not generally associated with precision”

Later, much to my surprise, when I was talking to my VA doctor he pulled out targets he had shot with his RPR and he had some pretty impressive groups.  I started reading about the rifle and found most everything I was reading was saying that the RPR is pretty outstanding.  So when I saw one in 6.5 Creedmore for sale at Gulf Coast Armory I had to pick it up.

Ruger Precision Rifle

Sadly, I don’t have ammunition for it yet, so I haven’t gotten to see its true worth yet.  But that has given me some time to pull it apart and examine it.

Overall I am very impressed with the rifle.  I have the Gen 2 RPR that comes with a different handguard, muzzle brake, and aluminum bolt shroud.  Sadly the Gen 2 rifles are $200 more then the older ones, and I think I would have preferred to have the Gen 1.

It looks like Ruger’s initial plan was to make a 1000 yard gun at $1000 dollars.  The rifle is packed full of features that you don’t see elsewhere.  The ability to use AR15 handguards and grips , A folding adjustable stock that can be replaced with any AR15 stock, a good adjustable trigger, threaded hammer forged 5R barrel.  The barrel can be removed with an AR15 barrel wrench.  20 MOA rail, etc.

Lots of features.  Now to get all that in that price, the rifle does have plenty of machining marks and a few sharp edges.  I think the lack of perfect fit and finish is a negligible price to pay compared to what all else you are getting.  However if you are a perfectionist, this may not be for you.

Ruger Precision Rifle CAD

Stock:

The RPR comes with a carbine buffer tube installed with a fully adjustable stock.  Length of Pull, Cheek Riser height, can be adjusted along with the ability to cant the recoil pad.  It also include a couple of places to attach a QD swivel.  I really like this stock, but I find if you are trying to quickly make an adjustment it will bind up.  Very adjustable, but not quick to adjust.

Safety:

I really like that the RPR uses an AR15 safety with a reduced throw, about 45 degrees.  Sadly this safety seems like it was added almost as an afterthought.  While fully functional, it is kind of loose and actuating it feels sloppy.  Instead of using a detent and spring like on the AR15, Ruger just relies on friction and a wire spring to hold the safety in place.  When I had my rifle disassembled I found the Ruger safety looked like a rough investment casting coated with the cheapest black spray paint available.  I swapped it out for an extra Colt safety I had laying around and that greatly reduced the slop and play in the safety.  At some point I intend to get an Ambi safety for this rifle.

Handguard:

The Gen 1 rifles came with a keymod handguard with a full top rail.  This interfered with some scopes that have a large objective lens.  The newer RPR have a keymod handguard that omits that top rail.  Some claim that you can put ANY AR15 handguard on the RPR, but that simply isn’t the case.  Between the RPR receive and the hand guard nut, is the RPR’s barrel nut, which is about .2 inches long.  This prevent any AR15 rail that uses the AR15 upper for alignment from fitting correctly.  Some companies, like Midwest Industries and Seekins have made new handguards specifically for this Ruger rifle.

Muzzle Break:

Ruger Precision Rifle Muzzle Break

The muzzle break was added as part of the $200 upgrade on the Gen 2 rifles.  First was that mine was installed crooked.  This break is covered in burrs and looks like someones first machining project.  I’ve already pulled it off as I intend to mount a Surefire Silencer.  This is the only part of the rifle I really feel is unacceptable.

I am really excited about this rifle.  I am looking forward to seeing what I can do with it.21

Upgrading My Outdated Weapon Lights, the Surefire X300

This past week, I sold a few of my older weapon mounted lights (WML) and got some very awesome deals on replacement lights. I sold several, over 12 years old, Insight M3 tactical lights and a first Gen Streamlight TRL-1. I carried some of these on duty years ago when they were the best/newest WML out there.  All were in like new condition and served me well, but with 65 and 80 max output lumens, these lights were very outdated. In fact, they were dangerously inadequate for my needs. I probably hung on to them for a few years, far to long because of sentimental reasons, and I was so use to them.

7-6-14 Cell 059
Old Streamlight TLR-1 / Insight M3 Weapon Lights
Surefire X300 Weapn Mounted Light
New Surefire X300 Weapn Mounted Light

For a pistol weapon light, I personally like lights at or under 200 lumens. I have found that this provides very adequate target identification light, while preserving my night vision, with appropriate use. The new lights at 500, 600 and over lumens, have a negative effect on my night vision, with momentary on and off use indoors and at typical handgun engagement distances. I find that I get several spotting/blinding circles, from the momentary on position with over 500  lumens. While this is great for blinding your adversary, it also creates those hard to recover spots in my eyes.

Surefire X300's
Surefire X300’s / Sig & Glocks
Surefire X300's
Surefire X300’s / 175 Lumens

I was able to sell off all of my older WML’s and broke even with their replacements, (pretty damn good).  I was able to find two (2) new in box, Surefire X300’s and one (1) like new in box, Surefire X300. I have used the X300 before and found the 175 lumen Surefire X300 to be my personal preference, for my home defense/carry handguns. The Surefire’s have a more focused light beam compared to other WML’s. This makes them have a brighter focused beam that extends their range an bit, with a descent cascading peripheral edge light feel.

Surefire X300's off
Surefire X300’s off
Surefire X300's On
Surefire X300’s On

Final Thoughts:

I think  I made out extremely well, replacing my older weapon lights and getting the light output (lumens) I prefer in a home defense or carry weapon light. Now that the Surefire X300 Ultra’s (A and B) are out, you can find some great deals on people selling the older x300’s. I will be replacing some of my rifle WML’s with X300 Ultra’s in the near future. If you happen to find an older quality X300, don’t hesitate to jump on it for your CCW or home defense handgun.

Duncan.

Sig Sauer SP2022-FDE 9mm

We have all known about the SIG Pro (SP) SP2022’s for several years but for some unexplained reason it is always forgotten.  I have always looked at getting one, because of their reputation, quality and very low price point. In the early 2000’s I owned the older SP2340 in .357sig, so I had some experience with the SIG Pro polymer framed guns. Recently the SP2022 has become even more competitively priced with added features. I could no longer pass the SP2022 up and when I ran across a deal on a SP2022 in Flat Dark Earth (FDE) I jumped on it, to get back into SIG SAUER’s. I have always liked the look , feel, and performance of the Classic Line of SIG SAUER handguns.

SP2022 FDE 9mm

Continue reading Sig Sauer SP2022-FDE 9mm

COLT 6940PISTON PART 2 ACCURACY AND LONG RANGE TESTING

After taking a look at the parts and guts on the Colt 6940 Piston carbine last time, it is now time to show the results of testing the carbine for accuracy and reliability.

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For my accuracy testing of the carbine, I used the Leupold 18x target scope on a Larue SPR mount and my usual bags and test as I am wont to do.  I fired all groups shown at 100 yards and 200 yards using a variety of match factory ammo as well as my own match handloads. I also  fired the gun at 1,000 yards and 500 yards in my typical test to push it as far as possible. Once again for the long range resting, the 18x target scope was used,

To make the job a easier , I did use a SSA trigger int he carbine this time.  The reason for using the SSA trigger instead of the milspec trigger this time, was because there is a reputation of piston guns having a little less accuracy than DI guns.  My thinking was to try my best to eliminate anything I could that may give results that I , or anyone, may be biased to attribute to the piston system. So I used the match SSA trigger and a very secure front rest and sand bag set up from a bench.   I wanted to get every bit of accuracy I could from the carbine.

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Above are the 5 rounds groups fired at 100 and 200 yards.  Due to limited amounts of some of the test ammo, I was only able to use 5 round groups after zeroing the gun and settling in.   While all groups are what I considered great, I did notice small changes in the group size with certain match ammo  from the DI guns to the piston. When using the DI carbines some of those brands shoot better  in about every DI carbine/rifle I have used and other bands are not as tight while it seemed to be the opposite with the piston.  Now, this is a small amount and not worth even talking  about in a practical matter, I only noticed because of firing the ammo through so many guns that I was able to notice the change,  Practically speaking , and from the outlook of field use, It is irrelevant.  You can notice the SSA and the TAP strings vertically at 200 yards and beyond,  I shot these at a later time with a cold clean bore and with a cold dirty bore and hot dirty bore. Those brands of ammo string vertically in the gun after you get to 200 yards.  Again, practically speaking, it is not enough to matter or worry about in a carbine  with a milspec barrel meant for fighting.  It may be just this one gun, or may be those brands are sensitive to a piston operated carbine. I have no idea.  But I present the info to you regardless.

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Above is the target with the boxes of some of the brands tested. Below is a closer picture of the groups for closer inspection.

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After seeing the results of the groups and being pleased with the accuracy , I determined it was worthwhile for long range testing.  With the guns potential in mind, I and my friend loaded up and went to the mountain top strip job for the long range testing 3 weeks ago. Weather was mid with slight winds.  Being on top of the mountain, it is hard to catch a windless day.  The wind without fail travels right to left and can be seen on target as can be seen in almost all long range test targets from me.

I used a cardboard target with two orange panels to make target ID easy and to give me a better aiming point.  Readers will notice I have used as variety of different target types and styles for long range testing,  This is an ongoing project of mine to determine the best target and color combination to make long range testing as easy as possible to center the target in the optic for precise aiming,  This system worked well on a sunny day, but the color or the paper was not much help late on when the sun was not shinning on it directly.

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The shots fired at 500 yards , I circled with a sharpie. The 1,000 yard shots  I drew a square around them. The one hole with a star like squiggle drawn around it, is a hit that I am not sure is a 500 round or 1,000 yard shot. I thought it was a 1K shot but later I thought maybe I intended to mark it when I fired the 500 yard group.  So I marked it as a 500 shot to not give myself the benefit of the doubt  and make a note of it.  I feel it is more honest in this case to just call it as a 500 yard hit.   On top of that, the 1,000 yard string obviously shifted to the bottom left corner and I feel it was unlikely that one of the 1K shots hit that far right and high.

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The first fired 10 rounds at  500 yards using the Black Hills 77 grain MK 262 MOD 1 ammo.  Five hundred yards is not a serious challenge for a quality carbine. Especially off of a bench rest and bags with an 18x optic.  As per my usual method, I fired 10 rounds on a steel target gong to confirm my zero. I think fine tuned on a few skeet I lay around the target to make sure it is refined, then fire my “record group” of 10 rounds.  As you can see I missed the target completely on one shot and of course the specially marked hit that may or may not be a shot at 500 yards. So NOT giving myself the benefit.  8 out of 10 rounds on target at 500 yrds.   But, this is a very good group.  The wind showed me some mercy while I fired the 10 shots and it shows.  Once again, you can see the vertical stringing sneaking into the group.

Last I fired 20 rounds at 1,000 yards with 6 hits and then the hit in question that may have been a seventh round hit,  Once again, not giving my self the benefit, I toss this shot out since it is in doubt, I give a count of 6 hits. The wind at that distance carried the shots further to left and I used several minutes to get me on the target this much.   For the 1,000 yard group,I switched to my personal hand loads,  It is a pet load that out performs factory ammo and is hot enough I do not share the load data.  Now, whether it shoots better at this range or I just have more confidence in it, I have no idea really. But confidence is a huge factor, so I stick with it since it has always performed well for me.   It takes extreme effort to get a 16 inch barreled carbine on target at 1K.  Using a 20 or 18 inch barrel or better yet, a 24 inch barrel 556 gun is like heaven compared to the gymnastic it takes to get a carbine on but it can be done.  Once again, I show it, just to show what a person can do with an M4.

The  6940Piston has some benefits in the long range testing in the fact that it comes with the SOCOM profile heavy barrel that is a big help. If the piston does disrupt the barrel from its extra movement and vibrations, then the heavy SOCOM barrel meant for harsher full auto firing schedule, helps cut this down possibly.

Last we come to the reason that the piston M4 carbine is supposed to exist. More reliability and especially in hard use with little cleaning, And of course in a military context, full auto fire with little cleaning and lube.

Last week friend of Looseournds.com and my neighbor , Tug Valley Armaments brought his full auto guns out for us to do some hard testing of the Piston Colt.  Since getting the gun in the mail from Colt. I have rnot cleaned or lubed the gun.  After 784 rounds of no cleaning and no lube, It was time.  We put the upper on the full auto lower and fired up a few 40 round Pmags to get it so hot, it took glove to even hold it by the  KAC vertical fore grip.  I stuck a full surefire 60 round mag in the bone dry, very dirty gun with zero lube on it and held the trigger down until empty.

The gun went through the magazine without issue. Let me tell you it was hot before I fired the mag, and it was smoking after., We got the carbine dangerous hot.

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You can see the barrel of the carbine smoking from the heat of the 60 round mag dump after not taking a break after also firing through five Magpul 40 round Pmags and various USGI 30 rounders.  There was no problem form the gun. It ran wonderfully.  I cannot make any dubious claims of the BCG being cooler because it was a piston though since by the time I stopped shooting even the receiver extension was hot to touch.

One observation we did not expect is that the gun on full auto  would not run with the full auto lowers carbine buffer.  We slapped the upper on the Class III lower and left the buffer it had in it in place. I went to auto and it was semi auto only.  After thinking about it a second, we put the H2 buffer that comes standard in the  6940Piston, in the NFA lower and the gun ran perfectly. Just more reason why I have always appreciated Colt giving at least the H buffer in their carbines and heavier buffers based on what the  gun was intended to do.

The piston 6940 is a superb piston AR15 carbine. If you are the type who thinks he has to have a piston to kill the commie invasion, I can not see you being let down by this gun or find any complaints.  If you just want a great gun and you like this one and do not have any strong thoughts on the piston vs DI, you are gonna love this gun.  If you are a DI die hard guy like me?  You are still going to really like this gun.   I won’t be switching to piston nor do I feel the need to, but I am impressed by this gun. I think the DI does edge it out in accuracy with match ammo, but in practical field use it is not really a factor.   Since I used match ammo for the testing in the part, I will be using milspec issue ammo testing in the next part  to see how it does and  possibly a direct shoot off  between the 6940 Piston and the standard 6940 DI gun.  So, if you are interested check back for that info.

SCAR-L Review And Thoughts

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A test and review of the SCAR-L by us has been long in coming. Over the past few days, we did finally got a chance to test and evaluate a SCAR. I shot it in some drills and did accuracy testing of it in my normal manner or off of a bench using sand bags.

The SCAR probably needs not introduction at this point in time. It was developed by FN to be what they hoped would be the replacement for the M4 carbine. Well. That did not happen, turns out it was not all that much better as claimed and the 5.56 guns issued out to certain elite units, were turned back in for M4s.  That does not mean it is a bad gun or unreliable, just that it was not considered to really be much of an improvement over the excellent M4 family of weapons.  Thought the 7.62 model has had more success.

So, to see for ourselves and those who may be thinking about getting one, lets take a look at it.

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One of the bigger hyped things about the SCAR is the folding stock and the reciprocating charging handle. The gun came to me with the charging handle on the right side. I found this intolerable. If you are a lefty it would not be bad at all. But most of us are not.  The charging handle was swapped to the left side where it was much better for handling. Then I found out that it was in the perfect place for me to tear the skin off my knuckles when charging the weapon if it had any optic mount on it.  I had to be careful about this after a couple of times learning the slow way.

The Stock folding to the side does make it very compact, and unlike the AK type. it is also adjustable for length. I found it not to be bad at all. But not really all that great either. In the past there has been people reporting the stock to have some durability issues, but I had since heard that was over come on newer models.   The stock also had a adjustable cheek rest I found marginally useful while I had it.  Though I am sure it would be of benefit with some optics.

One thing to remember if you buy one, is that it will not take a military standard spec AR15 grip. So if you want to use something else you have to do some fitting with the grip or gun….

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The optic that came with the gun is a Elcan Specter.  I am not going to review it,since this is mainly about the gun. but it had a a max power of 4x and could switch to 1x and a red dot along with a few other  gem jams.  It was mounted with the ARMS throw levers that excelled at skinning my knuckles when using the charging handle on the left side.

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I shot the SCAR at 100 yards using my usual method.  First used 77 grain match ammo.  You can see the results above.   I have no explanation for the left side flyer.   The gun’s barrel has a 1/7 inch twist. so it can stabilize the heavy rounds.

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The above target it labeled both dots as 55gr Tactical Urban Rifle ammo, but that was a mistake on my part. I was talking to a friend while doing it and made a mistake.  right side is 55gr. and the left is M855.

Notice the gun fired the 77 grain ammo high and a little to the right and shot the lighter stuff a little more to the left.  007

In rapid fire drills, I was surprised by it.  The guns muzzle break is very effective. It is very flat and mild in recoil. Though it has plenty of unpleasant blast like any brake. After the first magazine I remarked it felt almost like a 22LR.  The gun with that brake was calmer and flatter in recoil than any surefire brake I have used on a weapon of like size and barrel length and contour.   Speaking of the barrel contour, it is thin. Thinner than I would ever want. Especially on a gun meant for heavy use.  It got hot very fast and stayed hot.     In addition to the pleasant recoil mitigating brake, this gun has a really good trigger.  I have forgotten the make of the trigger but will get the info and update this with it as soon as I can.  But the smooth match trigger and the muzzle device made the gun something easy to shoot.  I can see why some use it in 3 gun type events.      With the grip provided on the gun though. it was impossible for me to work the safety without changing my grip with the firing hand,

A few other points and opinions that may be unique to me.  The rail section of the gun as is, is not enough. If you need more than a weapon light on the the stock gun, you are going to need a VFG.    It is no wonder that companies came out with rail extenders for the weapon so fast.   Another thing is, I was not a fan of the way it field strips as compared to the AR15.  Also the front sight was not as intuitive as I would have preferred. Of course all this is probably due to me having much more time with AR15s and the hear set up for them.    A warning to the “fit and finish ” and ” I want my guns to look good!” crowd.  The color of the finish does not match. You will have about 3 different shades of FDE. so if you cry yourself to sleep at night because you have brass marks on your case deflectors, then you better not buy this one.

I enjoyed shooting the SCAR-L.  But in my opinion, it is certainly not better than or more easy to use over an M4. I do not feel it to be more accurate than a good Ar15 either ( at least this model).  I thought the stock left a lot to be desired. Reloading it was not much different than on a M4  thought the safety has a shorter arc to travel from safe to fire.  Sad to say the grip used on the gun did not allow me to see for myself if it was really an advantage, I am doubtful it really is a huge advantage even if it seems like it would be.    If you want to be different or want one for whatever reason and have the money and think you will  love it. then you are probably right.   but it is not for me.

If I had to make a recommendation on the SCAR weapons, I would suggest following  the Army Rangers example and get the SCAR-H in 7.62 instead

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One last detail. I used an ATLAS bipod on the gun over the 3 days time with the gun.  I thought it had some nice features, and was certainly well made, but I do not consider it as handy as a decent Harris Bipod. I would not buy one with my own money. And if given one, I would not use it for anything that  needed to be able to deploy it fast.

Surefire 60 Round Magazine Full Auto Test

Since the surefire 60 round mags have came out a few years ago I have been doing some long term testing of them.  They seem to have a shady reputation for reliability in some corners while others deem them fine.  I have written about them a few times already.  I tested them for reliability and durability, as well as talking about how the changed the handling of a carbine and perceived weight. Last year I  wrote about how I left two of the 60s fully loaded  for a a hair under 2 years, then fired them with no problems.

I continued that test and  had another surefire 60 round mag fully loaded for a hair over 3 years. I had planned on firing it and writing about it, when a friend brought over a full auto lower.   It was a great chance to test the mag since full auto is more strain on everything.

I slapped my Colt H3 buffer in the lower and my Colt 6940 upper on the dealer sample lower and fired the surefire mag in burst.

As can be seen in the video. I worked perfect.  I followed that up with a few more times  of using it in longer bursts  with no problems.  The Surefire magazines may be hit and miss and have a certain rep online. But I have had no problems with my three and long term testing and efforts to get one to fail without completely abusing it, have shown them to be reliable.    I will continue long term testing with updates since the mag is still  is in doubt as a useful piece of gear. I have to say that I still have confidence in the ones I have been testing and would use them without worry.