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Short Term Bug Out Bag for “Just in Case” Emergencies

I find it so funny that when my friends watch Doomsday Preppers they think of me.  I suppose I can take that as a partial compliment.  Trust me, I enjoy the show, but sometimes I feel people go a little over board.  However, if the shtf, these people are going to be the ones cozy and secure.  My idea of preparation is not letting it consume my life, but doing enough where I feel comfortable… little by little.  I’d rather spend $50-$200 on supplies and ammo per month versus buying other things.  These items never go to waste.  When the expiration date approaches for my canned goods or dehydrated food, I simply take it with me backpacking or camping.  As far as ammo… you can never get enough of that!  I just want to make sure that in case of an emergency, my family and friends will have supplies.  I won’t lie… I have searched for the costs on an underground shelter/container, but that’s purely curiosity (I think).

I strongly encourage everyone (especially ladies) to make an emergency bag.  The costs are minimal and it’s a lot of fun.  I keep this bag in my car.  I figure that 80-90% of the time I am not home, I’m usually outside somewhere with my car nearby.  I can almost guarantee that 100% of the time unless I’m backpacking or hunting, I won’t have adequate shoes on.  I have an 8-5 office job and my typical fashion are high heels, converse, or flip flops.  All not “emergency” wear.  So I decided to share what I have prepared with you in hopes you build your own.

CAT’S SHORT TERM B.O.B. CONTENTS

  • Sturdy backpack
  • Old comfortable tennis shoes
  • Para-cord bracelet
  • Mechanic gloves
  • Hand and toe warmers
  • Storm proof matches
  • Magnesium fire starter
  • Spoon
  • GPS
  • Batteries
  • Bug spray
  • Headlamp
  • Knife
  • Steri-pen (UV water purifier)
  • Wet naps
  • Justin’s Hazelnut Chocolate Packets (YUM!)
  • Mini fire tinder
  • Plastic gloves
  • Disposable face masks
  • First aide kit with Advil
  • Mylar sleeping bags
  • Small pair of binoculars
  • Pair of pants
  • Shirt
  • Smart wool socks
  • Long sleeve thermal shirt
  • Mountain House food – a mixture of pouches that require hot water and the other cold water in case I can’t use fire.  4-6 pouches in total.
  • Bottles of H20/Bladder
  • Solar power and hand crank radio and USB charger
  • Jet Boil
  • Multi-tool
  • Poncho

Anyways, you get the point.  It’s pretty fun when you make your own.  Will I ever need all this stuff?  I hope not, but if I have to find out at least I’m prepared.

MAKE A PLAN

It doesn’t hurt to have a plan in place.  What if you are at work?  What if your kids are at school?  How will you reconnect with your family?  What if your home is destroyed, where will you meet?  Assuming there is a great possibility I will be at the office, I created a map/route for me.  If for some reason my home was not safe, I have a designated meeting location.

SUPPLIES AT HOME

People have asked me which canned foods have the longest shelf life…

  • Spam (about 3 years, I think my newest cans say 2015)
  • Canned chicken/tuna

There are a lot of other foods, just check the labels.  Of course I don’t put these in my pack because of the weight, but I do store at home.

Additionally, I have medical supplies, 100 hour candles, water containers, glow sticks, etc…  I’ve also talked to my neighbors about prepping because let’s say there was a big earthquake in California, our community would have to help one another.  Making your neighbors aware is a very important step in helping your survival.

If you have any questions on any of the items, please feel free to write me.  🙂

SO WHAT’S MISSING???

I’d like to have a Bug Out Revolver for my pack.  I’d like to ask you for any suggestions.  Ideally, I’d like the cost to be less than $600, since there is a possibility it may get stolen.  What revolvers do you suggest and why? 

Q&A 6

This is a LooseRounds.com Q&A session.  If you have a firearms related question please email it to QA@LooseRounds.com. We will post the your questions anonymously and give you our answers.

1.  What is the most accurate and lethal round in 5.56mm at 200 yards and under?

Shawn:  According to Dr. Roberts that would be the 55gr Triple Shock X loaded by Black Hills.

2.  Just ran across your blog.  Please consider blogging about our film http://kck.st/OllEYn

LooseRounds.com:  Ok.

3.  Is the forward assist on the ar15 worth having?

Howard:  Most of the time, it is not of much use.  However it can be handy for closing the action quietly when hunting, or forcing a round close in an emergency situation.  Under normal use, you should never need it.  However there is the occasional time is it well worth its weight.

Shawn:  It is definitely worth it being on the gun.  It is never a good idea to force a round into the chamber that doesn’t want to go under its own power, it is always better to eject a round.  It is handy for silent brass checks at night or if you have a weak spring.  I have never heard of it causing a problem in a properly built mil-spec gun.

Duncan- While the forward assist it not something that is going to be used often, I have always subscribed to the theory that, I would rather have something and not need it, than not have it and need it. I have never found myself in a situation where using the forward assist was really needed. For military applications I’m sure there are countless situation where it has been needed. Remember if you are plinker on the weekend, sure there is not need.  If you are a Military in harm’s way it is probably something you would not want to be without. As for LE, anytime your rifle has a malfunction, it is an immediate transition to you sidearm and fix it later when you have time and cover.

 

4.  Have you had any issues with the 10.5 SBR.

Howard:  Having owned a few AR15 Short Barreled Rifle (SBR) uppers and worked with some more, I can say with confidence that a quality 10/10.3/10.5 inch barrel can run reliability and accurately.  Now you can even get sub-10 inch barreled rifles that will run great.  For 5.56, I would not recommend less then a 10 inch barrel due to the muzzle velocity, flash and blast, and how hard they are on suppressors.  I have found that the standard gas SBR AR15s tend to run better as SBRs then the pistons, especially when suppressed.  Many of the the piston guns tend to need to be adjusted to run suppressed and can be louder then a DI gun due to gas venting ports.  I personally owned a LMT 10.5 inch upper that while it ran well, it has a 10MOA point of impact shift when suppressed.  Since then, most of my SBR uppers have been cut down barrels worked on by ADCO Firearms to eliminate issues like this.  Daniel Defense makes some very handy 10.3 inch barrels, but Shawn and I have found the Daniel Defense hammer forged barrels to not be as accurate as we would like.

To sum it up, SBRs run great if you buy a good one.

5.  Is there any accelerated wear from shooting steel cased ammo?

Howard:  Steel cased ammo can wear extractors faster in guns like the AR15 and 1911.  However by the time you wear one out, you would have saved more then enough money to replace it.  While I would not recommend steel cased ammo in a match barrel, if you use military type rifles and clean them properly, steel cased ammo will give you no issues.

 6.Question: What should I be looking at for an emergency backup firearm in my patrol car.

Duncan– There are several things to think about when looking at backups in your vehicle. Training is key no matter what you choose. Remember; Train like you fight, Fight like you train. An ankle holster with a back up is always a good option, a reliable lite-weight  snub nose was always my favorite on my person. For your vehicle, I preferred a full or mid size duty pistol that carried my same duty load.  Mounted to your dash or next to your console, where you can quickly access it, in-case of an ambush or driver exiting quickly before you get your seatbelt off. With a full duty load you can return effective fire and bunch through your windshield if needed.  I can’t stress training with them in your vehicle as much as possible, so it become second nature.  I would do both if you can.   

We asked Catherine Kim to answer a few questions we have received from email and facebook.

Q:  My wife wants a pistol to carry, what handgun do you think would be a good choice for her? Caliber and type of handgun?

Catherine:   Take her to the range and rent/test various guns.  Help her find something that is light to carry, comfortable to shoot, reliable, yet still has the stopping power necessary in a defensive situation. That’s what brought me to decide on the Sig P226, but there are many good new female friendly guns. The Glock 19 is very simple to use and reliable, the Smith and Wesson M&P pistols come with 3 different sized backstraps for perfect hand fit, the S&W Airweight is a super light revolver, Ruger, Kel Tec and Kahr all make sub compact carry models, etc. Nothing beats actually shooting the gun before buying it.
Q:  What kind of chest rig or LBE for a women?

Catherine:  The style will depend on your body build.  Try visiting the Women’s Tactical Association at http://womenstactical.ning.com/ and ask around. Eagle and LBT(Londong bridge trading) make various sized plate carriers and chest rigs
Q: Who makes body armor for women?

Catherine:  Savvy manufactures women’s body armor- http://www.savvyarmor.com/.

Q: Holster for CCW for woman? 

Catherine:  Well first decide if you want OWB(outer wasitband) or IWB(inside waistand). Kydex seems to be the popular choice these days(Raven, Bravo, Shadow Concealment). For IWB I dont think you can beat Crossbreed Holsters.
Q: Molle back pack for women? 

Catherine:  Yes, there are many companies that manufacture molle packs that fit women.  Personally, I use Eberlestock for backpacking and hunting.  I like the durability, frame, and the fitment.  If you are going to spend the money for high quality packs, I recommend visiting a local gun or hunting store and trying it on.  For my bug out bag, I have an inexpensive Molle pack I bought at the local Gun Show.   There are many vendors that sell cheaper brands that are still comfortable.  Once again, make sure you try it on. Look into Eberlestock, Granite gear, Mystery Ranch, and 5.11 tactical

On Handgun Malfunctions

Shawn and I asked Mark Hatfield to comment on a malfunction training issue he had.

On Handgun Malfunctions

Once upon a time I was in a class where the topic of the moment was clearing malfunctions of semi-automatic handguns. One of the presumptions was that the user was in a gunfight when this problem arose. We were taught two methods. The first was a long taught technique that was OK for a number of situations but did not clear everything as the second method could. As all of us being experienced shooters, were not expected to be able to forget the first, long practiced, method, but be able to move to the second if the first did not resolve the problem.

‘Always’ was a word spoken often when referring to this drill, the second method would ‘always’ fix the malfunction. Always. Some of you reading this may already guess where this story is going. The teacher created a simulated malfunction in my gun. I did the approved method which always works and ….. it didn’t work. I simply moved to a similar technique taught by a different school and it took care of the problem.

Years ago it was Massad Ayoob who said that while semi-auto handguns may malfunction (jam) more often than revolvers, they are easier to clear, while a revolver which jams may have to go back to the workshop. Also years ago, some people used to proclaim that revolvers never jam. The truth is that revolvers can jam in a number of ways, and I have experienced more than a few of them myself.

Some of us shooters who are now experiencing life on the downside of the hill remember when shooters of semi-autos who were with the ‘cutting edge’ of the art practiced several different drills, each for a different type of malfunction.

Remember that these ‘immediate action’ drills are for when lead is flying through the air. In some rare extreme situations, what appears to be the immediate problem can be resolved, another shot fired, only to have your gun blow up in hand and face. These type of situations have happened twice with guns which belonged to me. Fortunately these particular guns were ‘overbuild’ and designed to handle higher pressures than earlier versions of similar guns. While the guns were damaged, the shooters were not. While in these two cases there was no catastrophic destruction of the guns, such can and thankfully rarely, does occur. For ordinary range practice, when a problem occurs, you stop shooting.

It is John Farnum who points out that if you’re shooting at someone and a malfunction occurs, don’t just stand there and be shot at while fixing the problem, MOVE. While fixing the problem, move to get behind cover or at least just keep moving to make it more difficult for your attacker to hit you. All his malfunction drills include moving off of the spot where you were.

As has been said before, two sounds you never want to hear from your gun: a ‘click’ when it was supposed to go ‘bang’, or a ‘bang’ when you thought it would go ‘click’.

Home gunsmithing

It is said that people who own Harley Davidson tend to think ownership means qualified to work on them.

Same thing for gun owners.  Not I am not saying that you can’t work on your own guns, but you really need to know what you are doing.

All the time at the range I see failures in AR15s from not installing the stock correctly, fire control group springs in the wrong places.  Firearms unable to be zeroed due to improper sights and sight installation.  1911 and revolver triggers get tuned to the point of unreliability.

I have to be honest, I have done this my self.  Had the buffer retaining detent pop up and cause the hammer to not hit the firing pin.  Had a connector sold to me as “glock brand” cause reliability issues.  Broken screws and bolts using improper torque values.  The list goes on.

Many modern firearms are simple to work on.  However simple to work on does not equal fool proof.  Make sure you know what you are doing when you work on your firearms, and if you are not sure, get an experts help.