Tag Archives: Magpul

Sig Sauer SP2022-FDE 9mm

We have all known about the SIG Pro (SP) SP2022’s for several years but for some unexplained reason it is always forgotten.  I have always looked at getting one, because of their reputation, quality and very low price point. In the early 2000’s I owned the older SP2340 in .357sig, so I had some experience with the SIG Pro polymer framed guns. Recently the SP2022 has become even more competitively priced with added features. I could no longer pass the SP2022 up and when I ran across a deal on a SP2022 in Flat Dark Earth (FDE) I jumped on it, to get back into SIG SAUER’s. I have always liked the look , feel, and performance of the Classic Line of SIG SAUER handguns.

SP2022 FDE 9mm

Continue reading Sig Sauer SP2022-FDE 9mm

COLT 6940PISTON PART 2 ACCURACY AND LONG RANGE TESTING

After taking a look at the parts and guts on the Colt 6940 Piston carbine last time, it is now time to show the results of testing the carbine for accuracy and reliability.

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For my accuracy testing of the carbine, I used the Leupold 18x target scope on a Larue SPR mount and my usual bags and test as I am wont to do.  I fired all groups shown at 100 yards and 200 yards using a variety of match factory ammo as well as my own match handloads. I also  fired the gun at 1,000 yards and 500 yards in my typical test to push it as far as possible. Once again for the long range resting, the 18x target scope was used,

To make the job a easier , I did use a SSA trigger int he carbine this time.  The reason for using the SSA trigger instead of the milspec trigger this time, was because there is a reputation of piston guns having a little less accuracy than DI guns.  My thinking was to try my best to eliminate anything I could that may give results that I , or anyone, may be biased to attribute to the piston system. So I used the match SSA trigger and a very secure front rest and sand bag set up from a bench.   I wanted to get every bit of accuracy I could from the carbine.

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Above are the 5 rounds groups fired at 100 and 200 yards.  Due to limited amounts of some of the test ammo, I was only able to use 5 round groups after zeroing the gun and settling in.   While all groups are what I considered great, I did notice small changes in the group size with certain match ammo  from the DI guns to the piston. When using the DI carbines some of those brands shoot better  in about every DI carbine/rifle I have used and other bands are not as tight while it seemed to be the opposite with the piston.  Now, this is a small amount and not worth even talking  about in a practical matter, I only noticed because of firing the ammo through so many guns that I was able to notice the change,  Practically speaking , and from the outlook of field use, It is irrelevant.  You can notice the SSA and the TAP strings vertically at 200 yards and beyond,  I shot these at a later time with a cold clean bore and with a cold dirty bore and hot dirty bore. Those brands of ammo string vertically in the gun after you get to 200 yards.  Again, practically speaking, it is not enough to matter or worry about in a carbine  with a milspec barrel meant for fighting.  It may be just this one gun, or may be those brands are sensitive to a piston operated carbine. I have no idea.  But I present the info to you regardless.

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Above is the target with the boxes of some of the brands tested. Below is a closer picture of the groups for closer inspection.

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After seeing the results of the groups and being pleased with the accuracy , I determined it was worthwhile for long range testing.  With the guns potential in mind, I and my friend loaded up and went to the mountain top strip job for the long range testing 3 weeks ago. Weather was mid with slight winds.  Being on top of the mountain, it is hard to catch a windless day.  The wind without fail travels right to left and can be seen on target as can be seen in almost all long range test targets from me.

I used a cardboard target with two orange panels to make target ID easy and to give me a better aiming point.  Readers will notice I have used as variety of different target types and styles for long range testing,  This is an ongoing project of mine to determine the best target and color combination to make long range testing as easy as possible to center the target in the optic for precise aiming,  This system worked well on a sunny day, but the color or the paper was not much help late on when the sun was not shinning on it directly.

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The shots fired at 500 yards , I circled with a sharpie. The 1,000 yard shots  I drew a square around them. The one hole with a star like squiggle drawn around it, is a hit that I am not sure is a 500 round or 1,000 yard shot. I thought it was a 1K shot but later I thought maybe I intended to mark it when I fired the 500 yard group.  So I marked it as a 500 shot to not give myself the benefit of the doubt  and make a note of it.  I feel it is more honest in this case to just call it as a 500 yard hit.   On top of that, the 1,000 yard string obviously shifted to the bottom left corner and I feel it was unlikely that one of the 1K shots hit that far right and high.

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The first fired 10 rounds at  500 yards using the Black Hills 77 grain MK 262 MOD 1 ammo.  Five hundred yards is not a serious challenge for a quality carbine. Especially off of a bench rest and bags with an 18x optic.  As per my usual method, I fired 10 rounds on a steel target gong to confirm my zero. I think fine tuned on a few skeet I lay around the target to make sure it is refined, then fire my “record group” of 10 rounds.  As you can see I missed the target completely on one shot and of course the specially marked hit that may or may not be a shot at 500 yards. So NOT giving myself the benefit.  8 out of 10 rounds on target at 500 yrds.   But, this is a very good group.  The wind showed me some mercy while I fired the 10 shots and it shows.  Once again, you can see the vertical stringing sneaking into the group.

Last I fired 20 rounds at 1,000 yards with 6 hits and then the hit in question that may have been a seventh round hit,  Once again, not giving my self the benefit, I toss this shot out since it is in doubt, I give a count of 6 hits. The wind at that distance carried the shots further to left and I used several minutes to get me on the target this much.   For the 1,000 yard group,I switched to my personal hand loads,  It is a pet load that out performs factory ammo and is hot enough I do not share the load data.  Now, whether it shoots better at this range or I just have more confidence in it, I have no idea really. But confidence is a huge factor, so I stick with it since it has always performed well for me.   It takes extreme effort to get a 16 inch barreled carbine on target at 1K.  Using a 20 or 18 inch barrel or better yet, a 24 inch barrel 556 gun is like heaven compared to the gymnastic it takes to get a carbine on but it can be done.  Once again, I show it, just to show what a person can do with an M4.

The  6940Piston has some benefits in the long range testing in the fact that it comes with the SOCOM profile heavy barrel that is a big help. If the piston does disrupt the barrel from its extra movement and vibrations, then the heavy SOCOM barrel meant for harsher full auto firing schedule, helps cut this down possibly.

Last we come to the reason that the piston M4 carbine is supposed to exist. More reliability and especially in hard use with little cleaning, And of course in a military context, full auto fire with little cleaning and lube.

Last week friend of Looseournds.com and my neighbor , Tug Valley Armaments brought his full auto guns out for us to do some hard testing of the Piston Colt.  Since getting the gun in the mail from Colt. I have rnot cleaned or lubed the gun.  After 784 rounds of no cleaning and no lube, It was time.  We put the upper on the full auto lower and fired up a few 40 round Pmags to get it so hot, it took glove to even hold it by the  KAC vertical fore grip.  I stuck a full surefire 60 round mag in the bone dry, very dirty gun with zero lube on it and held the trigger down until empty.

The gun went through the magazine without issue. Let me tell you it was hot before I fired the mag, and it was smoking after., We got the carbine dangerous hot.

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You can see the barrel of the carbine smoking from the heat of the 60 round mag dump after not taking a break after also firing through five Magpul 40 round Pmags and various USGI 30 rounders.  There was no problem form the gun. It ran wonderfully.  I cannot make any dubious claims of the BCG being cooler because it was a piston though since by the time I stopped shooting even the receiver extension was hot to touch.

One observation we did not expect is that the gun on full auto  would not run with the full auto lowers carbine buffer.  We slapped the upper on the Class III lower and left the buffer it had in it in place. I went to auto and it was semi auto only.  After thinking about it a second, we put the H2 buffer that comes standard in the  6940Piston, in the NFA lower and the gun ran perfectly. Just more reason why I have always appreciated Colt giving at least the H buffer in their carbines and heavier buffers based on what the  gun was intended to do.

The piston 6940 is a superb piston AR15 carbine. If you are the type who thinks he has to have a piston to kill the commie invasion, I can not see you being let down by this gun or find any complaints.  If you just want a great gun and you like this one and do not have any strong thoughts on the piston vs DI, you are gonna love this gun.  If you are a DI die hard guy like me?  You are still going to really like this gun.   I won’t be switching to piston nor do I feel the need to, but I am impressed by this gun. I think the DI does edge it out in accuracy with match ammo, but in practical field use it is not really a factor.   Since I used match ammo for the testing in the part, I will be using milspec issue ammo testing in the next part  to see how it does and  possibly a direct shoot off  between the 6940 Piston and the standard 6940 DI gun.  So, if you are interested check back for that info.

Frank Proctor Way of the Gun Sling

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In looking for a sling for my Colt 733 clone I wanted something that had both modern two point adjustability and an appearance that didn’t look out of place on a quasi retro AR. I hadn’t had much luck finding anything that really suited me until I stumbled across the Way of the Gun sling from Frank Proctor. Liking what I saw, I ordered one in ranger green to try out.

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The sling itself is the absolute definition of minimalist. A basic 1” nylon strap, two buckles, two paracord attachment loops, that’s it.  Total weight of the sling, including the paracord attachment loops, is 1.98 oz.

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Close up of the para cord attachment loop.

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The length adjustment slider. Push forward to lengthen, pull back to shorten.

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The only stitching on the entire sling.

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Comparison photo of the Proctor sling next to a Magpul MS1.  Note the slings opposite function.  On the WOTG sling push the slider forward to lengthen the sling and pull back to shorten, while the Magpul slider pulls back to lengthen and pushes forward to shorten.  Not that either way is good or bad, just something to keep in mind.  Earlier I mentioned the WOTG sling with paracord attachments has a total weight of 1.98 oz, in comparison the Magpul MS1 with two quick disconnects has a total weight of 7.71 oz.  A 5.73 oz difference.

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Comparison of the length adjusters and attachment methods.

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Difference in width between the slings. 1” for the Proctor WOTG sling vs. 1.25” for the Magpul MS1.

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Proctor WOTG sling mounted on my 733.

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Here are a couple of photos of the sling mounted up on other AR’s to show the versatility in mounting it to different weapons.

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I’ve been using the sling for a couple of months now and have been pleased with it.  I’ve found the sling to be simple, lightweight and efficient.  The strap doesn’t bind up or get in the way, and the length adjuster slides smoothly.  It gets the job done with no fuss or drama, which is all I ask in a sling.

My only suggestion for improvement would be to, due to its small size, make the serrations on the sides of the length adjuster more pronounced to give the hand something to really grab/lock onto.

One bit of caution, the strap is thin and the material is flexible, I can see the potential for the sling strap to dig in and become uncomfortable if carrying a heavier weapon slung for long periods of time.  Given I’ve mostly run the sling on a sub 6 lb SBR it’s never been an issue for me, just something to think about.

All in all if you’re looking for a lightweight minimalist sling that won’t get in the way, a sling that can easily be switched between weapons that don’t have provisions for quick disconnects, or a sling that gives modern two point quick adjustable function with an old look the Frank Proctor Way of the Gun sling is a solid choice.

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Magpul PMAG17 vs. factory Glock 17rd mag Photo Comparison

We recently acquired one of the new Magpul PMAG17 GL9 mags to try out and see if it equals a factory Glock mag.  As the flash flooding pics Shawn has put up on the Loose Rounds Instagram account show, the weather hasn’t allowed us to get any range time on it yet.  I have however taken some pics comparing the two.  Here you go…

Note, in all of these pics the Glock mag is on the left and the Magpul mag is on the right.

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The interior of the Magpul mag.IMG_0267 IMG_0270 IMG_0273 IMG_0274 IMG_0275 IMG_0276 IMG_0277 IMG_0279

USPSA Journal #1: Magpul Pmag 17, Freedom Munitions Remanufactured 9mm, Zev Race Connector

Alright: here is my USPSA series on practical pistols in competition and home defense. Right now the series is just getting started with some local matches and a nearly box stock G17. As I move foreward, I will be competing with an open class gun which favors reliability over game enhancing parts and products. Keep an eye out for the G17 PDW gun as it evolves into a (hopefully) performance enhancing shooting iron with the ALG defense six second mount, custom kydex holster, and a few other accessories along the way.

Special thanks to www.looserounds.com for hosting the video / pistol series!

The New Rifleman

Review: LWRC Compact Stock and LWRC Folding VFG

I like the stock, I don’t like the VFG.
Colt 6945 with LWRC

The LWRC Compact Stock runs about $60 dollars.
It is very much like a mini-SOPMOD stock. Don’t mistake this for LWRC’s Ultra Compact Stock, which requires a different receiver extension and buffer system.
LWRC Compact Stock
This stock is small(about the same size as a M4 stock), light, includes a QD socket, and best of all it is cheap. It will drop right onto a milspec diameter buffer tube.

The LWRC Folding Vertical Grip runs about $40.
LWRC VFGLWRC VFG Folded
I like the size and feel of it, I didn’t find it clunkly or awkward. It is slightly longer than a Tango Down “stubby” VFG.
LWRC Folding VFG vs Tango Down Stubby VFG

When I first saw this, I thought it would feel blocky, clunky, and would be awkward. When I actually used it, I found that I liked the feel of it. When folded up(in the configuration I had it in), it could be held like a Magpul AFG.

The problem with this VFG is that when locked open, it wobbles. I found a good bit of play in the folding VFG and I found that distracting when holding the rifle. While the VFG does “lock” open, requiring pulling down on a peg on the grip to close, it still had excessive play when open. If it locked up with out movement I think I would love this grip, but that wobble causes me to dislike using it. This VFG is held on with two torx screws, and much be slid on from the end of a rail.

I recommend the stock, I don’t recommend the VFG.

Stuff I Like From 2014

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Magpul MS1 slings: The MS1 got rid of my complaints about Magpul slings (unwanted single point hardware & open loop adjuster) and combined it with a smooth sliding adjuster, a soft and non binding nylon strap, and a reasonable price. It has become my preferred sling.

http://looserounds.com/2014/11/26/magpul-ms1-sling/

 

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Colt 6720: I won’t spend too much time on this one since Duncan has already covered it, and I echo his thoughts on it. After picking one up earlier this year, I found the 6720 to be lightweight, quick handling, accurate, and reliable. Everything you could want an AR carbine to be.

http://looserounds.com/2014/12/19/colt-lightweight-ar6720-carbine/

 

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Colt 901 MARC: After some trigger time on our 901 MARC t&e gun I prefer it in most every way over the original 901. The weight loss from removing the rails on the sides and bottom of the gun, which combined with the resulting thinner handguard profile have lead to a far better handling gun.

I found I could get a better grip on the MARC due to the thinner handguard which along with its lighter weight allowed me to run and gun with it almost as though it was a 5.56 gun. Surprisingly the reduced weight didn’t come with a noticeable increase in recoil, probably due to getting a better support hand grip on the handguard for recoil management.

All of the pros of the original 901 in a lighter, better handling package.

http://looserounds.com/2014/11/07/first-imppressions-colt-901-m-a-r-c-modular-rail-carbine/

http://looserounds.com/2014/11/29/colt-901-m-a-r-c-accuracy-test-review-part-1/

Duncan’s Best of 2014

Here are a few of my favorite products of 2014. They are in no particular order.

M&P Shield,  without safety:

After the first of the year disappointment in the G42 being a .380, the new M&P Shield stepped in to fill the single stack 9mm role everyone was wanting. Smith & Wesson quickly capitalized by finally listening to what most had said about the Shield over the last few years. Mainly, many wanted the Shield to be offered without a safety, to operate more like the M&P Full Size models and a Glock.  I picked up the new Shield offering mid-year and it basically goes with me every day. The Shield had a few hiccups when first released and some recently. These issues have been fixed by Smith & Wesson and the Shields are very reliable. One thing I found very interesting, is when I fired the 9mm Shield and the G42 together, I did not feel a lot of recoil difference.

S&W M&P Shield /no safety
S&W M&P Shield /no safety

Lancer L5 AWM Magazines:

If you have followed us for a while, you know my personal stock up/go to magazines are USGI with Magpul followers and L-Plates. In 2014 I found amazing deals on Lancer L5 Advanced Warfighter Magazines (AWM) at USGI prices so I jumped on them.  The Lancer L5 AWM is (In my Opinion)  the best magazine to use for Duty/Defensive purposes. A true 30 round capacity polymer magazine with the strength of wraparound steel feed lips. Most of the popular polymer magazines will crack, over time, around the feed lips. With the Lancer’s this is a non-issue. Price was always the only reason I did not buy a lot of Lancer’s. In 2014 Lancer L5 AWM’s became my go to magazine.

Lancer L5 AWM Smoke Translucent
Lancer L5 AWM Smoke/Translucent

Surefire X300 Weapon Light:

Several of the LR staff have bugged me to get a Surefire X300 over the last few years. As with everything I get, price is always a factor, as I have multiple defensive weapons and it’s hard to get several firearms equipped with a weapon light when they are expensive.  The Streamlight TLR-1 is usually what I like to use. I purchase a Surefire X300 specifically to mount on one of my AR-15’s and I am glad I did. The Surefire X300 is the best weapon mounted light I have used on an AR-15. It is a little more user friendly on the AR, has a longer distance more focused beam and has a little more lumens than the TLR-1’s I normally use. On a patrol rifle, for my specific purposes, the Surefire X300 is the best weapon mounted light I have used to date. It has just the right combination of function and light output, for both outdoor and indoor use.

SureFire X300 Weapon Light
SureFire X300 Weapon Light

Colt AR15-A4 Lightweight LE Carbine (AR6720):

The low prices on AR15’s have been great in 2014. At the beginning of the year I purchased a Colt AR6720. It is one of those AR’s that made me say, ” Why did I wait so long to get it”. You find yourself wondering how a pencil barrel can really make that much of a difference. Once you get it in your hands, it just feels right.  The 6720 has all of the things you want in a reliable lightweight Carbine. It is lightweight, fast, smooth, accurate, fun to shoot and most importantly, it has the quality and features you expect in a duty/defensive carbine. I really purchased the 6720 for my wife and she absolutely loves it, but I find myself wanting to steal it. (looserounds.com / colt-lightweight-ar6720-carbine)

Colt AR6720 Lightwieght LE CArbine
Colt AR6720 Lightwieght LE CArbine

Aimpoint Micro T1/H1:

For the second year in a row, I have to mention the Aimpoint Micro’s. I have slowly replaced all of my older 30mm (M2, ML2, ML3) Aimpoint’s. They are simply, small, fast, rugged, reliable, lightweight and have unmatched battery life. There is not much more that I can say that is not already out there. Aimpoint is simply the best RDS and I feel the micro’s are the best within the Aimpoint line.

Aimpoint Micro  T1/H1(RDS)
Aimpoint Micro T1/H1(RDS)

Kinetic Concepts Tactical MOLLE-Link:

For me, the Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) MOLLE-Link system, has to be my favorite and I think most innovative products this year. It is one of those things that is so simple yet so effective and makes you wonder why it took so long for someone to think of it. The MOLLE-Link system allowes a low profile ability to mount Kydex holsters, magazine and accessory pouches directly to MOLLE webbing, with no bulky accessory attachments.  The KCT MOLLE-Link products are easy to quickly mount/remove and are extremely secure. Great product and idea from KCT. (looserounds.com / kinetic-concepts-tactical-molle-link-holsters)

Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) MOLLE-Link
Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) MOLLE-Link

Duncan.

Magpul MS1 Sling

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In the past, I hadn’t ever paid a whole lot of attention to the Magpul MS series slings for a variety of reasons. I’m not a fan of single point slings so the MS 2/3’s 2 to 1 point convertibility was of no use to me, nor were the hooks/clips/rings that went along with the convertibility. I also never cared for the loop pull sling length adjuster as it always seemed to be a snag hazard. Combine that with a price slightly higher than your basic BlueForce Gear Vickers sling and the Magpul slings didn’t make my radar.

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That changed recently while ordering some AR parts from one of my go to AR parts vendors.  In need of another sling, I clicked on their sling page. Seeing they didn’t carry my standby BFG Vickers sling, but wanting to order everything from one place to save on shipping, I checked out the other slings available. That’s when I noticed Magpul had introduced another sling called the MS1. Upon seeing it was a dedicated 2 point sling lacking all the hooks/snaps/rings, the loop pull had been replaced by a plastic slider, and it was priced quite economically I thought what the hell, let’s try it out.

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Upon receiving the sling I found it to be a fairly straightforward 2 point design featuring the sling strap, three tri sliders and the plastic length adjuster. It seems well made and the stitching looks good.   A digital scale shows it to weigh 5.9 oz not counting the Magpul Paraclip I added.  Also immediately apparent upon handling the MS1 is the strap is made of a much softer and more flexible material than the BFG Vickers sling.

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At 1.5″ wide the MS1 is also slightly wider than the BFG Vickers, with its 1.25″ width.

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I added the Magpul Paraclip as an interim way to attach the front of the sling to the rifle until I get around to putting a rail on it.  As you can see I clip it to the factory front sling swivel.  It’s a quick and dirty way to attach the sling with a side mount orientation and not too much rattle.  It you’re ever in need of some type of hook or clip sling attachment I’d recommend trying them out.

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I’ve been using the sling for over a month now and have been pleased with its performance. The sling material doesn’t seem to bind, catch, or twist when donning/doffing or adjusting the sling. The length adjuster slides very smoothly, to the point I questioned if it would always hold tension or if I would find the sling slowly lengthening itself under weight. So far this has not been the case and the sling length adjuster has always held tight no matter its position. I will update if this starts becoming an issue.

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In summary while I wouldn’t necessarily say the MS1 is better than any other sling out there I would definitely say it is a solid choice and should be considered if you’re in the market for a sling. I plan on picking up a few more.

Crusader Weaponry Broadsword .308 Rifle

Several months ago I had the opportunity to meet Joe Chetwood, owner of Crusader Weaponry (crusaderweaponry.com). He had moved into my neighborhood and as we both have a passion for firearms, we naturally ended up meeting each other. I met with Joe at his home on several occasions to talk about the Broadsword and Crusader Weaponry products. One thing led to another and I was soon in possession of the Crusader Weaponry Broadsword .308/7.62 Carbine.  From the second you hear Crusader Weaponry’s name, see the Crusader Shield marking etched on the side of the Broadsword, you feel like the paladin of old. The Broadsword channels an era when knights wielded the broadsword, to strike powerful blows to the enemies of righteousness and honor. As I spent time with the Broadsword, I found it to be the modern day, hard hitting, dispenser of .308 justice it was built to be.

Crusader Weaponry Broadsword
Crusader Weaponry Broadsword
Sighting In the Broadsword
Sighting In the Broadsword

Specs / Accessories:

The Broadsword is an AR10 type direct impingent carbine chambered in .308/7.62mm. The Broadsword I was given came equipped with:

  • Apex free-float rail system
  • Diamondhead Back-UP iron sights (front & Rear)
  • BattleComp compensator
  • Battle Arms Development ambidextrous safety selector
  • Bravo Company 7.62 Gunfighter Charging Handle
  • Magpul MAID grip
  • Magpul Utility Battle Rifle (UBR) stock
  • Two Magpul PMAG 20 round 7.62/308 magazines
  • Hard Rifle Case

The upper and lower receivers are a 7075-T6 billet aluminum match set from SI Defense. The upper picatinny rail has engraved “T” mark numbers. I found there was absolutely no play between the upper and lower. The barrel is an 18 inch, 416R match grade stainless steel barrel, with 1/11 twist polygonal rifling.

Apex free-float rail system
Apex free-float rail system
BattleComp Compensator
BattleComp Compensator
Battle Arms Development ambi safety selector
Battle Arms Development ambi safety selector
BCG / Gas Key Staking
BCG / Gas Key Staking
Diamondhead Iron Sights
Diamondhead Iron Sights

The upper & lower receivers of the Broadsword are finished in Cerakote Sniper Gray, as well as the barrel. The bolt carrier group and the inside of the upper receiver are treated with Crusader Weaponry’s proprietary Slipstream dry film weapons lube. The dry film lubricant is applied at 150-200 psi, permanently imbedding the dry lubricate to those surfaces it is applied to. The trigger group, charging handle, buffer, and buffer spring can also be treated with Slipstream by choosing different packages offered by Crusader Weaponry.

7075-T6 Billet Match Set Receivers
7075-T6 Billet Match Set Receivers
7075-T6 Billet Match Set Receivers
7075-T6 Billet Match Set Receivers

After spending time with the Broadsword I would change out a few features, like the stock, grip and the rail system, but those are just because of my personal preference. Since Crusader Weaponry is building these custom rifles per individual order, you can get whatever grip, stock or accessories you would prefer. While visiting Crusader Weaponry’s shop, I noticed several Broadsword builds in progress and these rifles had individual requests for different accessories on each rifle.

Field Striping:

The Broadsword brakes down just like an AR-15. If you are running a 5.56mm AR-15, the Broadsword will be very familiar. It just has bigger internal parts. Cleaning and maintenance of the bolt carrier group, charging handle, upper receiver, chamber and barrel are extremely familiar, if not identical to your 5.56mm AR15.  The only thing you will need to add to your cleaning kit is a 308 chamber brush and bore brush. Once field stripped and cleaned, I applied some of Crusader Weaponry’s proprietary Slipstream STYX lubricant to the Broadswords.

Field Stripped
Field Stripped
Bolt Carrier Group / Charging Handle
Bolt Carrier Group / Charging Handle

Performance/Reliability:

I used a couple of Aimpoint Micro’s and an Aimpoint PRO on the Broadsword. The Broadsword is a lot more accurate than I am and I have seen it fired for accuracy with a magnified optic. A few weeks ago I was able to fire another Broadsword with a 1X4 adjustable scope and found this to be a nice combination.  I am not going into formal, measured, MOA accuracy on the Broadsword. I ran the Broadsword like a battle rifle from CQB out to 100 yards. I ran it like a beefed up patrol rifle and as I said before, the Broadsword is a lot more accurate than I am capable of making it. While sighting in the Broadsword, on different optics, I was fully satisfied with 100 yard groups. With some of the OTM match ammo I was right on top of the previous rounds I fired. Once I got it sighted in, I was off to the races running the Broadsword hard.

The trigger felt very close to a standard mil-spec trigger. It had a slightly crisper break than a mil-spec trigger, but there was nothing special about it. It did not affect long range shots but felt very familiar  when running it like a patrol rifle. Once again, the trigger group is an area that can easily be upgraded if you want.

The Broadsword is an absolute blast to shoot. For a larger heavier carbine in 308, it has rather natural pointability, very similar to a 5.56mm AR15. I have spent over three months with the Broadsword firing various brands and loads of ammunition through it. I fire close to 1000 rounds of 308 through the Broadsword. I know this particular rifle has been reviewed by several notable industry members and recently was in Special Weapons for Military & Law Enforcement Magazine. This particular Broadsword was very dirty and well used when I got it. The Broadsword never failed during my time with it. It literally chewed its way through everything I put into it. With every thump of 308 fired and with every magazine exchange, the Broadsword just kept going. I even switched back and forth from cheap steel case Monarch to Federal Premium without a stoppage. I found the Broadsword really liked Federal Sierra Match King in 168 grn and 175 grn. I got the best results accuracy wise with this ammo. I found the action to be very smooth. The bolt carrier slid back and forth smoothly even when gritty, dry and hot from prolonged use. After the Slipstream STYX had started to burn off, the Broadsword still ran very smoothly.

Target Results
Target Results

Now, the Broadsword is a beast, although it looks slick and sexy it has some weight to it. Nothing a few pushups and exercising won’t fix. It’s nothing you can’t handle but after spending a full day with it, you will know that you have been carrying it around. Although it has weight to it, it is balanced very well. I was able to rack the Gunfighter charging handle with my support hand and change magazines with ease, while holding the Broadsword up with my fire control hand.  The weight does dampen down the recoil making the Broadsword smooth and very enjoyable to shoot. Some weight could be shaved off by changing out some of the features on the Broadsword but you will be sacrificing the weight for more recoil.

Broadsword w/ Aimpoint PRO
Broadsword w/ Aimpoint PRO

I found the Broadsword’s recoil was straight back into the pocket of my shoulder. The BattleComp compensator did a nice job of taming the muzzle blast and rise. Now, if you are in a spotter role next to the Broadsword, the BattleComp does nothing for you and you will get your bell rung. After long days of shooting, I found my shoulder was not beat up or feeling the repercussions of all the 308 sent down range. While dumping follow up shoots into my targets, the reacquisition of the sights and Red Dot optics was, smooth and easy to track. With the Broadsword’s features and you doing your part, hard hitting rapid follow up shots, are very easy to keep on target.

Broadsword w/ Aimpoint T1
Broadsword w/ Aimpoint T1
Crusader Weaponry Longbow
Crusader Weaponry Longbow

Conclusion:

The Broadsword does feel like the modern equivalent of the medieval knights broadsword, right down to its cold grey steel look. Finding a 308 battle rifle that runs reliably can be a challenge. Crusader Weaponry is up to this challenge and the Broadsword runs flawlessly. The Broadsword can fill several roles from a heavy patrol rifle, a designated marksman rifle, a hog hunter or anything else you can think to use it for. Crusader Weaponry has several different AR15 and AR10 rifle models available. I had a chance to test fire a Crusader Longbow precision 308, with a very nice Leupold scope mounted on it. Although I only fired a couple of rounds out of the Longbow it looks very promising. I know of only a handful of AR10 type rifles that run reliably. I would put the Crusader Weaponry Broadsword on that list.

Duncan