Tag Archives: Holster

Female Conceal Carry for Fall/Winter

Cassie Larsen submitted this article.

The “Female Conceal Carry for Summer” article has been very popular. I know there is a lot of interest and a need, for more conceal carry information for women. I have found there is not a lot of information out there and I have had to do a lot of trial and error for this article.  In this article you will see several Appendix Inside Waist Band (AIWB) holsters and Outside Waist Band (OWB) holsters. These holsters and companies are as follows;  a Dark Star Gear holster, a custom AIWB kydex holster, a Raven Concealment Vanguard2 holster and Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) holsters. Also, an I.C.E. Belly Band and Volund Gearworks Atlas Belt will be used. I will be showing you outfits that conceal a Glock 42, Sig P238, Glock 19, and a Smith & Wesson M&P Shield.

Sweaters with detail and skirts:

I’ve noticed when wearing a skirt and conceal carrying I have two options I can wear a looser waist skirt with the I.C.E. Belly Band and carry IWB or I can wear a skirt with loops, belt and carry OWB. It does become a bit tricky with high waist skirts. I have yet to find a comfortable carry option for those.

The great thing about this black sweater that you can’t see well in the pictures is that it has a fake wrap look with buttons on the front and side. With that extra detail on the front it hides any bulges from the firearm really well. I like to wear darker sweaters I find they hide the print of the firearm better. I also look for shirts or sweaters with added details; buttons, wrap, bunching, gathers, patterns.

I.C.E. Belly Band/holster with Glock 42
I.C.E. Belly Band/holster with Glock 42

Long Sweaters with leggings:

I love wearing a Belly Band with my leggings. It is very comfortable and with the I.C.E. Belly Band I have multiple options of what firearm I can carry. With this outfit a basic long sweater, leggings and tall boots I can wear my Sig P238, Glock 42, Glock 19 or Glock 26. With the Glock 19 or Glock 26 I use the  I.C.E Glock open bottom holster, attach it to the Velcro on the Belly Band and carry at the 4 o’clock position. I.C.E store carries several holster to accommodate firearms you may carry.

I have many different long sweater legging combos and I love being able to just throw on a comfy outfit and still be protected. Most long sweaters have a fly away in the front. I like having the break away in the front so I can access my firearm quicker if needs be. I wear an under shirt, then my belly band with firearm, then an over shirt or tank top, then my sweater. It really adds no more bulk since my under shirt is basically a top slip. The main use of the undershirt is so I don’t have the firearm resting on my skin for long periods of time.

I.C.E. Belly Band,  G26 or Glock 19
I.C.E. Belly Band, G26 or Glock 19

Work out clothing:

When I go for a walk with my kids or jog by myself, I like to bring along some protection. With the Belly Band and my Sig p238 or Glock 42 I can do that and I don’t have to wear a big bulky shirt or extra layers. If it’s cold I do add my workout hoodie, which only adds to the concealment. I usually wear yoga pants or shorts which I feel keeps my firearm more secure since the waist is tight.

I.C.E. Belly Band with Sig P238 and Glock 42
I.C.E. Belly Band with Sig P238 and Glock 42

Break away sweaters:

I use the same idea as the leggings with this breakaway front sweater, but use my kydex holsters. I prefer to appendix carry. It is the most comfortable for me. I can easily access my firearm with my kids, or holding shopping bags. I don’t have to worry about bending over to pick up my kids at the park or store and having my weapon print. I wear Silver jeans or Vigoss jeans and capris. I buy my regular size and have no problem carrying IWB. My carry belt is Volund Gearworks Atlas belt (Volund Gearworks Atlas Belt for Women). I’ve been wearing it almost daily for over a year and I still love it.

Glock 42 with AIWB kydex holster and Glock 19 with Raven Vanguard 2
Glock 42 with AIWB kydex holster and Glock 19 with Raven Vanguard 2

Flowy shirts:

I really like wearing flowy light tops. This is a peasant type top, the fabric is light and not fitted at the bottom. Which conceals firearms really well for me. I have no problem with printing or the shirt getting stuck on the gun with appendix carry. The pattern on this shirt also helps with the concealment.

Glock 42 with AIWB kydex holster
Glock 42 with AIWB kydex holster

Banded bottom:

Banded bottom tops also work well for me to conceal carry with. They have more give to the middle of the shirt but with a fitted bottom. Some banded bottom shirts can be trickier if the band is at the same height as the holster. I like the tight bottom on banded shirts because I know the shirt isn’t going to move and expose my firearm.  This particular top also has a low back so appendix carry or side carry work well. When it’s colder out I can still wear this tank top with a black jacket or cardigan which just adds to the concealment.

Sig P238 with Dark Star Gear OWB Kydex holster, Glock 42 with AIWB kydex holster
Sig P238 with Dark Star Gear OWB Kydex holster, Glock 42 with AIWB kydex holster

Combination Shirts:

This is a great home-run shirt for me. It has pattern, detail and a banded bottom. The upper back detail is great to draw eyes up and away from my waist wear my firearm is. The diagonal stripe helps camouflage printing and the banded bottom helps the shirt stay in place. I really like to find combo tops I think they work great for most of my firearms. With this shirt I can carry any of my firearms with any holster at either the small of my back or at appendix. With small of the back carry I do have to be careful with bending over or picking something up because the firearm will print. Which is another reason why I love appendix carry.

M&P Shield & Glock 42 in Kinetic Concepts Tactical holsters
M&P Shield & Glock 42 in Kinetic Concepts Tactical holsters

Light weight Jackets:

A great thing about colder weather is you can throw on a jacket to any of your outfits which adds warmth and another layer of concealability. I’m wearing a simple long sleeve shirt which is not skin tight. With summer capris that work great with knee high boots, no need to fold and tuck the bottom of your jeans. I can wear this shirt alone and conceal the Shield fine or add the extra layer of a jacket. Since I’m appendix carrying I will still be able to quickly draw my firearm if needed. If you are carrying in the small of the back with a jacket on I recommend practicing drawing your firearm so you don’t get hung up on the extra material. This jacket snaps closed so if I did get cold and wanted to snap up I could still quickly undo my jacket if needed.  Of course, cardigans and heavy jackets will work just the same.

M&P Shield with Kinetic Concepts Tactical appendix holster
M&P Shield with Kinetic Concepts Tactical appendix holster

Conclusions:

There is no reason to lose your style just to carry a firearm. I suggest carrying on the body whenever possible. I recommend when shopping for new clothing to wear your firearm, that way you will know if it will conceal well and not print. Remember, darker colored clothing will conceal better than lighter colors. If you don’t have a good carry belt or holster, I recommend getting one. Having a quality holster and carry belt will help you conceal your firearm. If you have a good foundation in place you will be able to conceal with comfort, ease and style. A good foundation consists of a good holster, belt, firearm and clothing. Without all (4) of these key elements, you will have a harder time concealing your firearm.

Don't forget, You can still be Sexy & Carry a Firearm
Don’t forget, You can still be Sexy & Carry a Firearm

I’ve showed you many different firearms, holsters and carrying positions as examples for you to find what works best for you. I don’t carry multiple firearms. Some days I do need to change my holster, belt or firearm to accommodate my outfit. Occasionally, I must change carrying positions between appendix, strong side traditional and 4 o’clock, based on the outfit I’m wearing.  Appendix carry is where I consistently carry and consistency in your carry position is what you want. Like I said above, the appendix position works best for my daily life and my body type. The key is to find what works best for you most of the time and what you are the most comfortable carrying.

Cassie

Dark Star Gear Glock 17 Holster

There is no doubt that Loose Rounds Staff love Dark Star Gear (DSG) holsters. Tom at Dark Star Gear was kind enough to make me a Glock 17 holster to review. I specifically wanted a Glock 17 holster for competition and training, that had a sweat guard only to the slide stop and a slight cant under 10 degrees. It has been several months (3) since Tom from DSG provided me with this holster. I like to really use a product for a while before I sign off on it. I have used numerous Kydex holsters from several manufacturers and have a few that I really like. Shawn turned me on to Dark Star Gear and honestly I was thinking to myself, how much better can a Kydex holster get.

Dark Star Gear Holster, Glock 17 RTF2
Dark Star Gear Holster, Glock 17 RTF2

Well I have to say, after running the DSG holster, it is my favorite. My other holsters see little to no use now.  After talking with Shawn and seeing his reviews of the quality of the DSG holsters, I found I was not disappointed. The quality and attention to detail on the holster was amazing. The first thing that immediately stood out were the soft loops. Once you strap the holster on with the soft loops, you understand why DSG has chosen them. They make the holster more comfortable and flexible than hard loops on other similar holsters. Because the soft loops flex and conform to your belt and body, it makes for a close and more comfortable fit than hard loops.

I immediately started running the holster hard to get a feel for it. I spent the first hours with the holster doing one hundred (100) draws and fire from conceal carry. The holster had the right balance of retention and speed from the draw. I then started to carry the DSG holster every day for CCW and range use. It was not long before I was invited to a Combat Focus Shooting (CFS) class by Rob Pincus. I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to run the DSG holster in a serious, equipment demanding, defensive firearm course. In one day, I had already shot 500 rounds, drawing from the holster while, moving, running, turning and firing under stress.  The DSG holster exceeded all of my expectations and I had several others in the class ask me about the holster I was carrying.

Dark Star Gear Holster at CFS course
Dark Star Gear Holster at CFS course

On the first day of CFS, I had the DSG holster on a total of sixteen (16) hours. I never felt the holster, it did not dig into me and was by far the most comfortable holster I’ve worn in over a decade of law enforcement training and civilian conceal carry (CCW). Tom at DSG also pointed us in the direction of Volund Gearworks ATLAS belts. I used this belt in the CFS course with the DSG holster and it was the perfect combination for me. They are my go to CCW and range gear.

I have not counted the actual draws from the DSG holtser but at this time it is well over 2000 in training. This does not including administrative holstering and unholstering of daily CCW carry. My wife (Cassie) has also been using the DSG holster for carry and range use. She also feels it is the most comfortable holster for her and has referenced it in several of her articles.

Dark Star Gear Holster w/ Glock 17 RTF2
Dark Star Gear Holster w/ Glock 17 RTF2

Conclusions:

It is safe to say that the Loose Rounds Staff is firmly behind Dark Star Gear. For the price, turnaround time, quality and comfort, DSG is hard to beat.  This is one damn fine, tough and reliable holster as well. I have not noticed any wear on my firearm finish with all of the use of the holster. Not that it really matters to me but I know some people worry about it.

Check out the other reviews from Loose Rounds on Dark Star Gear and stop by their website.

Loose Rounds Reviews:

http://looserounds.com/2012/02/08/7/

http://looserounds.com/2013/03/14/another-look-at-dark-star-gear/

Site Link:

http://darkstargear.com/

Duncan

Female Conceal Carry for Summer

Cassie Larsen submitted this article. 

When I started thinking about conceal carrying, I was concerned about the printing of the firearm. How was I going to carry on a daily basis and keep the firearm safe and hidden. My husband, who has been conceal carrying for over a decade, said that I would have to adjust my clothing options if I was serious about conceal carry. I don’t know about you, but I was not happy with the idea of having to change my style of clothing, to a possible bigger, baggier, clothing style for conceal carry. After some time playing around with my current wardrobe, I am pleased to report I have many outfits that I can conceal carry very easily. Now, when I go to the store to buy new clothes I ask myself, “Can I easily conceal carry in this?” If my answer is no, then I look to buy something else.

Not a good conceal carry option for me
Not a good conceal carry option for me

I’ve read many articles that talk about downsizing your gun in the summer to still conceal carry. Many suggest carrying a 380. What if you can’t afford to buy a new gun or don’t want to down size your current caliber? In all the pictures in this article, I will be wearing a full size or mid size Glock. This will show you, you can still dress for the weather and conceal carry a mid to full size firearm. Once you understand that you can conceal a mid to full size firearm, like a Glock, you will have no problem concealing a smaller firearm.

Another thing to think of is where you are going to be carrying. You want to be consistent with where you carry, and where you practice drawing from. To me it would be confusing to carry at a different location per my outfit choice. I would hesitate when the time came to draw my firearm. Where is my gun at today? Is it on my thigh, in a belly band, strong side holster or appendix carry. If you need or want to carry in another position, remember to practice drawing from that position so that you can be efficient and consistent .

Jeans:

This is a normal button up shirt, it’s not baggy or a larger size then I normally wear. I did need to be more conscious when I bent over with this setup, because you could see the bottom of the holster. If someone was staring at my butt, at that moment, they would see the bottom of the holster, maybe that would make them stop though. I wouldn’t normally wear a Glock 17 but if I need to, I have clothing options that would work with it.

Volund GearWorks ATLAS belt, Dark Star Gear kydex holster, Glock 17
Volund GearWorks ATLAS belt, Dark Star Gear kydex holster, Glock 17

This is one of my favorite shirts, I have it in two different colors. I wasn’t sure if it was going to work because it’s a very shear shirt. But with the right gear you can’t see anything. Since this type of shirt is thin, it works well on hot days. I do recommend a IWB holster with a sweat guard so you don’t have any pinching or rubbing from the gun.

ATLAS belt, IWB kydex holster, Glock 19
ATLAS belt, IWB kydex holster, Glock 19

This shirt has a elastic bottom which makes it gather. This actually makes it a great conceal shirt. I can OWB carry without having the holster show, since the elastic gather hooks under the holster, it keeps everything in place, even with movement. There was no imprint difference with OWB or IWB carry.

ATLAS belt, IWB kydex holster, Glock 19
ATLAS belt, IWB kydex holster, Glock 19

Tank Top & Shorts:

This tank top is fitted in the back and I had no way to carry in my normal strong side carry. I thought I would try Appendix carry since this shirt gathers a little in the front. Also, to show another position for conceal carry. At first I didn’t think Appendix carry would be comfortable with the mid-size Glock 19. I was pleasantly surprised at how comfortable and easy it was to conceal with Appendix carry. I was so excited about the possibilities of concealment, with Appendix carry that I tried on many of my more fitted shirts. They worked much better with Appendix carry. I will definitely be exploring this carrying position a lot more in the future.

Appendix carry is something my husband is leaning towards. One thing that is very important with Appendix carry, is to get a quality Appendix carry holster.

Appendix Carry
Appendix Carry

Skirt options:

Who would think I was carrying a mid size firearm wearing a pencil skirt? I have several skirts that have belt loops, I thought why not try my gun belt with them.  I noticed with my current IWB holster, and Glock 19, wearing it with my skirts didn’t work well. My skirts either sit on my hips or high almost to my belly button without a holster. With my IWB holster my firearm was sitting too high on my back, or making my skirt fit weird. With the OWB holster, it was much more comfortable and my firearm was easier to access.

ATLAS belt, OWB kydex holster, Glock 19
ATLAS belt, OWB kydex holster, Glock 19

My Jean skirts all have loops too, which means a gun belt and holster will work well. Most women have a few cardigans in their closets. A cardigan is great for conceal carrying, just throw one on over any shirt and your good to go. I recommend buttoning up a few of the bottom buttons, you wouldn’t want your shirt to move and show your gun.

ATLAS belt, Dark Star Gear kydex holster, Glock 19
ATLAS belt, Dark Star Gear kydex holster, Glock 19

Wish list:

I am looking for a good conceal carry purse, for when I wear a dress. I would also like a belly band holster, for clothes that I can’t securely use a holster with. I’d like to try a pair of compression shorts. I’ve read good things about them, not sure if they are a gimmick or actually a good item. I’m also going to be in need of my own Appendix carry holster. I think my husband has created a monster… I now understand his constant researching and looking up new gun items on line. Maybe we will have to work out an agreement each new gun item he gets, I get one too.

ATLAS belt, IWB Holster, Glock 19
ATLAS belt, IWB Holster, Glock 19

Conclusions:

Warmer weather is no reason to stop carrying your firearm. Hopefully I’ve been able to show that you can still carry your mid/ full size firearm even with less clothing on.  It is important to remember, without the proper quality equipment (i.e. gun belt, holster) you are not going to conceal well.  In all the pictures in this article I am wearing a dedicated conceal carry gun belt and quality kydex conceal holsters.

Personally, I am happy I can carry for protection and still keep my style.

Cassie

Comp-Tac Minotaur MTAC Review

Article submitted by Adam O’Quinn

Comp-Tac Minotaur MTAC Inside the Waistband Holster Review

            Since receiving my concealed carry license almost ten years ago I have carried a firearm almost daily.  For most of that time I’ve used a Galco FX226 outside the waistband pancake holster.  It has served me well and I continue to use it when circumstances allow, however there are times when the type of dress I am forced to wear or type of event I will be attending make it impractical.  That being the case I found myself in the market for a good concealable inside the waistband holster.

 

After looking around online a bit I opted to go with the Minotaur MTAC IWB holster by Comp-Tac.  The MTAC features a leather backing piece with interchangeable kydex holster bodies attached via four hex screws, with the two screws closest to the weapon’s trigger guard doubling as the weapon retention adjustment, and two belt clips that are adjustable for ride height and holster cant.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC Comp-Tac MTAC

 

As a Glock user this holster appealed to me because by purchasing the 9/40/357 slide model of the MTAC I was able to have one holster that fit my G17, G19, and G26 with no modification.  Comp-Tac did this by leaving the muzzle end of the holster open thereby allowing the excess slide/frame of the G17 and G19 to extend just past the end of the kydex on the holster.  The muzzle of the G26 sits basically flush with the end of the kydex holster body.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC

Comp-Tac MTAC

Comp-Tac MTAC

 

I also liked that the holster allowed for a fairly wide range of adjustment when it came to ride height and cant due to the multi slot belt clips.  Another plus to the holster is that the kydex bodies are easily interchangeable.  By purchasing a 1911 kydex body I was basically able to have a second holster for a fraction of the cost.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC

Comp-Tac MTAC

 

When I received my MTAC it came with the holster, an instruction sheet, a hex key, a an NRA membership flyer, and a package of Smarties candy.  I’m not going to lie, getting the Smarties made me smile.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC

 

I have been wearing my MTAC on and off as circumstances dictate for almost a year now and have no real complaints.  It conceals well in both t-shirts and button up shirts, especially so if a situation dictates that I have to tuck my shirt in, and I’ve not had anyone realize I was carrying while using the MTAC.  While you’ll never forget it’s there the holster is comfortable to wear, and after a quick break in the leather backing conforms to the your body nicely.  As with most IWB holsters I’d recommend wearing pants with a bit of room in the waist to accommodate the holster comfortably.  The minimalist in me wishes the holster’s footprint was a bit smaller however it does not cause any issues and isn’t really a complaint on my part.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC

Comp-Tac MTAC

Comp-Tac MTAC

 

The only real issue I had was with the standard belt clips that come with the holster.  Because there is no type of hook feature on the bottom of the standard belt clip it did not securely grip against the bottom edge of my belt when drawing the gun from the holster.  This led to the holster coming out with the gun on a few practice draws.  Comp-Tac warns about this in the holster instruction sheet and advises that keeping your belt tight is necessary to ensure proper holster retention.  It’s a personal preference issue, and while I’m not sagging my pants like a gangsta rapper, I don’t like being forced to keep my belt snugged down that tight.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC

 

I envisioned that the standard belt clips could present this problem when looking at their shape online so I ordered the optional C-clip belt clips with the holster as well.  The C-clip features a hook shape on both ends of the belt clip which not only aides in securing the holster to your belt but in concealment as well since there aren’t two plastic strips covering the outside of your belt several inches apart.   With the C-clips installed keeping the holster in my waistband while drawing the weapon was never again an issue, and I am completely satisfied they resolved the problem.

 

Comp-Tac MTAC

 

In summary I’ve found the MTAC to be a well made holster that does well in its intended role of providing weapon concealment and comfortable wear.  I do strongly recommend purchasing the optional C-clip belt clips.  The MTAC will continue to be my go to holster when I need the concealment only an IWB holster can provide.

 

 

Adam

REVIEW: Shadow Concealment Kydex Holster

General Background:  Kydex was originally engineered in 1965 to be used in designing aircraft interiors.  Since then, its use has widely expanded and has become an extremely popular material to thermoform holsters, magazine pouches, knife sheaves and much more.  Once heat is applied to Kydex, it transforms into a moldable material to form various objects.  As the properties cool, it becomes a rigid high performance plastic structure that is durable.

Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster
Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster

A couple weeks ago I received my Shadow Concealment carbon fiber patterned Kydex OWB holster formed for my Sig P226 and SureFire X300 light attachment ($75).  Shadow Concealment, located in Georgia, is owned by Keith Buckner and he has been manufacturing Kydex products since 2011.  Out of the box, aesthetically it is a nice looking holster.  You can tell time was carefully spent in smoothing the edges after the cutting and riveting process.  The two pieces of Kydex adjoin together in symmetry.  Surprisingly, the carbon fiber pattern looks realistic and maintained its geometric design even after the thermoforming process.

Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster
Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster

Personally, I like Kydex holsters because of the lightweight durable rigid structure.  It helps me have a quick draw and the material curves against my body.  The handgun and light snap into the holster and is held securely even while running.  The draw out of the holster is smooth.   Another advantage is being able to customize it for my needs.  Having a holster that can also fit my light attachment is important for personal defense.  Many times before or after hunting I am backpacking in the dark and having my light attached to my gun and on my person is crucial.  That moment’s draw can define my future.

Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster
Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster

Overall, I was pleasantly pleased with Shadow Concealment’s Kydex holster.  They offer a wide selection of colors and patterns.  The craftsmanship is high quality while the price is reasonable with a full lifetime warranty.  My only suggestion is if you are in a rush, check the lead time (typically 6-8 weeks).  During my holster build they were relocating facilities, so it was delayed a slight bit, but what I appreciate the most is they stayed in contact with me giving me updates.

Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster
Shadow Concealment Carbon Fiber Kydex Holster

Lastly, I was able to ask Keith some questions…

Q: What’s your warranty?

A: At Shadow Concealment, we stand behind each product we manufacture.  We offer a full lifetime warranty. If your product ever becomes unsafe to use, damaged (to the extent it hinders performance), or is unusable, just return it and we will make any necessary repairs. Any adjustments needed are also covered by the warranty including retention and curvature of the holster to better fit the body. You can read about our warranty in length here- http://shadowconcealment.com/pricing–warranty.html.

Q: As far as care and maintenance, what can I do to keep my Kydex holster in top shape for a long period of time? 

A: The amount of care is going to be dependent on how hard you use the holster. We recommend washing it out with warm water and soap at least once a week (or at least water). This is going to keep down dust and debris down which can cause wear to the gun when it is un-holstered and re-holstered. If you are training hard, you may want to do it after each session.

Q: Just curious… what happens if you leave it in the sun?

A: That’s actually a good question. I’ve heard of one incident (I did not verify) where someone left their holster in their car for a long period of time and it lost its shape and retention to the point it could not be used. I’ve not done any testing to check this out but I have notice, that depending on the thickness of the Kydex, it will begin to become pliable between 180-220 degrees.  Because of this we don’t recommend leaving your holster in your car in direct sunlight. Not only does it have the potential to damage the holster but it’s also irresponsible gun ownership.

For more information:

Shadow Concealment- http://shadowconcealment.com/

Videos- http://shadowconcealment.com/youtube-videos.html

Steps of the Draw for Personal Defense.

When it comes to drawing your firearm for defensive shooting, there are a lot of techniques being taught.  Some people want no steps, while others want long complicated steps in presenting the firearm.  I have always been middle of the road when it comes to the steps of the draw. The main goal in the draw should be using the most efficient movement to get the firearm into the fight.  I have always used a six (6) step method to teaching the draw. The benefit of using these key steps is consistency in the draw for Duty Carry or Concealed Carry.

1.) Grip

2.) Clear

3.) Lock

4.) Grab

5.) Punch

6.) Trigger Press

In each step there are several things going on that you need to incorporate.  It is important to remember, depending on the encounter, you may not complete all six (6) steps. Most deadly force encounters (shootings) happen in low light, at extremely close distances, from three (3) to seven (7) feet. Incorporating these steps in the draw will address close range as well as longer range engagements. I will discuss the importance of each step.

The Draw:

Grip – This first step is critical as it sets the entire tone of the engagement.  The outcome could be won or lost right here.  Several things are going on at the same time: Support hand is clearing clothing and comes to the center of the chest (Grab position). Gun hand breaks holster retention and acquires a positive, high in the web of hand grip, with trigger finger indexed along the side. Movement should also start happening at the same time, (i.e. stepping off line or back).

Clear – Keeping the support hand on your chest, clear the firearm from all gear and clothing. This is the time that you will be taking the safety off of a firearm that has a safety (i.e. 1911, HK USP, Berretta). Continue your movement off line.

Lock – Bring the firearm up presenting the firearm towards the threat. This is a close quarters encounter shooting position (arms length). It is important to keep your support hand on your chest incase you have to fire.  This will help you avoid putting rounds through your own hand.  If you are not shooting from this position quickly transition to Grab.

Grab – Push the firearm forward and towards the center of your body. At the same time come underneath the trigger guard with the support hand and acquire a high ready two handed grip. The firearm should be high enough that your peripheral vision should start to pick up the front sight. Having the firearm in this position of the draw is critical to set you up for the next step.

Punch/Sights – From the Grab position push the firearm towards the threat while acquiring your sights. This should be a straight forward motion like a punch. Pushing the firearm straight out will avoid fishing or bowling of the firearm and sights. This straight motion from the Grab will help you pick up the sights faster. At this point your movement (stepping off line) should be ending, as you are preparing to fire.

Trigger Press – Once you have your sights on target, move your trigger finger from indexing to the trigger. All of the steps mean nothing if you mash the trigger and don’t get the rounds to hit. Use good trigger fundamentals and press.

These steps are a guide to help you in your training. All of the steps should be used in one fluid motion when presenting the firearm from the holster. The only time you should think about the steps is when you are going to shoot from one of the Lock, Grab or during the Punch steps.  Mix it up during your training. I had a fellow officer who would regularly train firing from the Lock position through the Punch, while moving off line, from close quarters.

Close Quarters Encounter:

Lock – If you have to fire from this position, slightly cant the firearm away from your body, rock back a little to make sure your rounds are contacting center mass. Canting the firearms slightly will ensure the slide cycles properly, especially if multipule rounds are needed.

Conclusion:

I feel, in the civilian Concealed Carry field, not enough attention is focused on close quarters encounters. Remembering the important steps in the draw, Lock, Grip and Punch are important fundamentals.  You are more likely to be stabbed than in a gun fight and that means close range. The steps will help you identify shooting skills you may need in protection of your family at home. In your house you will more than likely be at very close range to a suspect. Use the high ready Grab to move in your house or pull it back to Lock if you have to push someone away and then shoot.

Duncan

Q&A 2

This is the second session of LooseRounds.com Q&A.  If you have a firearms related question please email it to QA@LooseRounds.com. We will post the your questions anonymously and give you our answers.

Shawn and I thank Catherine Kim for the article she submitted and to thank Duncan Larsen for the articles he has submitted and for his help on our Facebook page.  We also appreciate the work CJ does as an editor on LooseRounds.com, he keeps us from looking as illiterate as we are.  Thanks also to Adam O’quinn for taking the 901 in action shots.

 

1.  How are the Surefire 60 round mags?

Howard:  Both Shawn and I own Surefire 60 round mags and we like them very much.  While we haven’t torture tested them, or run them very heavily, they appear to be good mags.  We recommend them, but be sure to test each mag before you rely on them.

2.  ar15 bolt face ring

Howard: Well that is not much of a question.  Normal wear on the bolt face may leave little pits, and a ring corresponding to the primer on the round.  If any pits extend into the firing pin channel, replace the bolt.

ARMY TM 9-1005-319-23&P and AIR FORCE TO 11W3-5-5-42 page 3-22 explain:

(a) Bolt faces with a cluster of pits which are touching or tightly grouped, covering an area measuring approximately 1,8 Inch across, will be rejected and replaced.

(b) Bolts which contain individual pits or a scattered pattern will not be cause for rejection.

(c) Bolts that contain pits extending Into the firing pin hole will not be rejected unless firing pin hole gaging check determines excess wear.

(d) Rings on the bolt face (machine tool marks), grooves, or ridges less than approximately 0.010 inch will not be cause for rejection.

3.  Winchester Model 70 used in Vietnam?

Shawn:  There were two types, one was the heavy barrel national match that had a target stock and a heavy barrel with a sporter stock.  The sporter stock model started off as sporters and then the Rifle Team Equipment (RTE) armorers added match heavy barrels.  Both were glass bedded and free floated by the RTE armors.

4.  Duty holster for 1911 with light

Shawn:  LooseRounds uses a Dark Star Gear holster kydex that can be used for IWB or outside carry.  Found it to be best of its type tested so far.

5.  scar 17 vs sig 716

Howard:  Right now you can get more parts and accessories for the Sig, such as cheap quality Magpul mags.  However as for company quality control and function out of the box, I would trust FN more then Sig.

6.  What cheap asian are good?

Howard:  Well, the following are optics and accessories are junk.  UTG, NcStar, Leapers, Counter Sniper.  Some of Tapco stuff is good, but much of it is junk.  ATI is similar with mixed quality items and plenty of junk.