Tag Archives: Duncan Larsen

Glock G43 Stripped Vs. G42 Internals

Last year with the release of Glock 42, Loose Rounds was one of the first to get out a completely stripped down look at it. We have had to wait a little while to get the new single stack 9mm G43, as it is probably the most awaited single stack 9mm in history. Now that we have it, let’s strip it all the way down and compare the parts.

The new G43 has several unique, redesigned, internal components that are very different from all other Glock’s.  You can see it is a 2 pin design, like the old Gen2 Glock’s, with a Gen4 magazine release and stippling identical to the G42.  I have completely stripped this G43 to give you an idea of what the new internal parts are. The Slide and Frame are obviously different between the two fireams ,but when completely stripping the G43, you will notice some of the parts are similar to the G42.  In-fact some of the internal parts are the same as the G42, but not all.  While I will not go into a complete tutorial on how to strip your Glock down, it is not extremely difficult and you can learn how to properly do it with some quality research.

G43 Disassembled
G43 Disassembled

When stripping the G43 completely down, pay close attention to the parts that are significantly different in their design and placement in the G43, compared to the traditional larger Glock Models. Also if you have a G42 make sure you are very familiar with what parts are compatible with the G43 and which ones are not. Below are several pictures of a completely stripped G43, the new internal parts and parts that are shared with the G42.

LOWER RECEIVER PARTS

G43 Lower Parts
G43 Lower Parts

Frame Pins:

The front Trigger Pin is slightly larger, as the frame is wider, and is marked differently in the G43. The G42 pin has two circle cuts where the Slide Stop Lever engages the pin. The rear Trigger Housing Pin, interestingly, appears to be the same as the G42 pin.

Frame Pins (G42 right), (G43 left)
Frame Pins (G42 right), (G43 left)

Locking Block:

The Locking Block appears to be the same as in the G42. They fit in both of the firearms.

Locking Block (G42 right), (G43 left)
Locking Block (G42 right), (G43 left)

Slide Stop Lever:

The Slide Stop Lever looks almost identical as in the G42, but you can see the spring tabs on the G43 Slide Stop are different. Also, The shape of the them is slightly different on the angle bars above the spring and they do have different part numbers. I found they worked in both firearms even though they have differences. I also have a G42 Vickers Slide Stop Lever and it works in both firearms but the Vickers is very loose in the G43. Im not sure I would bet my life on it working, so I would wait for the Vickers to come out in a G43 specific configuration.

Slide Stop Lever (G42 top), (G43 bottom)
Slide Stop Lever (G42 top), (G43 bottom)

Trigger Mechanism Housing w/ Ejector & Connector:

The Trigger Mechanism Housing (TMH) with Ejector and Connector, are identical to that of the G42. All the part numbers on the TMH and the Ejector are the same.

Trigger Mechanism Housing G42/G43
Trigger Mechanism Housing G42/G43
Connector / Ejector
Connector / Ejector

Trigger Spring:

The Trigger Spring parts, from what I can tell they appear to be the same part as in the G42.

Trigger Spring (G42 right), (G43 left)
Trigger Spring (G42 right), (G43 left)

Magazine Release:

The Magazine Release is slightly larger in the G43. The frame is just a little wider and the Magazine Release has a different part number.  These parts are not compatible between the two firearms.

Magazine Release (G43 top), (G42 bottom)
Magazine Release (G43 top), (G42 bottom)

Trigger Bar:

The Tigger Bar is longer in the G43 and the part numbers are different.  Unfortunately it is not compatible with the G42. I was hoping they would be the same as I absolutely hate Glock serrated triggers and I was hoping to swap it out to the G42 smooth trigger.

Trigger Bar (G42 top), (G43 bottom)
Trigger Bar (G42 top), (G43 bottom)

Slide Lock:

The Slide Lock is slightly larger in the G43. The frame is just a little wider and the Slide Lock has a different part number.  The Slide Lock Spring appears to be the same part.

Slide Lock (G42 top), (G43 bottom)
Slide Lock (G42 top), (G43 bottom)

SLIDE UPPER PARTS

G43 Slide/Upper Parts
G43 Slide/Upper Parts

Barrel & Recoil Spring Assembly:

Obviously the Barrel and Recoil Spring are larger on the G43.

Barrel (G42 top), (G43 bottom)
Barrel (G42 top), (G43 bottom)
Recoil spring (G42 top), (G43 bottom)
Recoil spring (G42 top), (G43 bottom)

Slide Cover Plate:

The Slide Cover Plate is slightly larger on the G43. The plates will fit in each slide, but the G43 Plate is taller and does not match up with the inside of the slide on the G42, making reassembly of the slide and frame impossible.

Slide Cover Plate
Slide Cover Plate (G42 left )(G43 right)

Firing Pin Safety:

The Firing Pin Safety is completely different on the G43 vs G42, it is larger. Again it can only go in one way. The smaller notch on the left side of Firing Pin Safety faces the Firing Pin.  The Firing Pin Safety Spring  appears to be the same part.

Firing Pin Safety (G42 left), (G43 right)
Firing Pin Safety (G42 left), (G43 right)

Firing Pin Assembly:

The Firing Pin assembly is very interesting. Some parts are the same as the G42 and others are not. The Spring Cups and Firing Pin Spring appear to be identical to the G42. The Firing Pin and the Channel Liner are clearly larger.

Firing Pin Assembly (G43 top), (G42 bottom)
Firing Pin Assembly (G43 top), (G42 bottom)
Firing Pin / Channel Liner
Firing Pin / Channel Liner
Firing Pin Spring
Firing Pin Spring
Spring Cups
Spring Cups

Extractor Depressor Plunger:

The Extractor Depressor Plunger Rod is larger on the G43, but the Depressor Plunger Spring and the Spring Loaded Bearing appear to be identical as the G42s.

Extractor Depressor Plunger (G43 top), (G2 bottom)
Extractor Depressor Plunger (G43 top), (G2 bottom)

Extractor:

The Extractor is slightly larger and has a different part number on the G43. It is extremely hard to tell the size difference visually, but the G43 Extractor is wider than the G42s.

Extractor
Extractor (G42 top) (G43 bottom)
Extractor (G42 left) (G43 right)
Extractor (G42 left) (G43 right)

Final Note:

If you are not a Glock Armorer, Gunsmith or you are very unfamiliar with stripping your Glock down; I would not recommend any disassembly past regular field strip maintenance. Most people will have no need to break the firearm down to this level. A few of the G43 parts look identical or are the same parts in the G42, but several are also newly designed/beefed up for the larger 9mm G43.  Hopefully this answered some of the questions out there about compatibility of parts with the G42 and G43.

Duncan.

For more information on how the parts fit in the single stack Glocks, see the link below. 

Link: Glock G42 Stripped / New Internals

Scalarwoks LDM/micro Mount

A few Scalarworks LDM/micro pictures to peak your interest in our upcoming review. This mounts is really nice and has some very nice features.

Scalarworks LDM/micro on Colt LE6920:

LDM right side / Colt 6920
LDM right side / Colt 6920
LDM left side / Colt 6920
LDM left side / Colt 6920
Colt 6920 /Scalarworks LDM / DD Omega X 12.0 FSB
Colt 6920 /Scalarworks LDM / DD Omega X 12.0 FSB

Scalarworks LDM/micro on Colt AR6720:

LDM right side / Colt 6720
LDM right side / Colt 6720
LDM left side / Thumbwheel
LDM left side / Thumbwheel
Colt AR6720 / Scalarworks LDM / DD Omega 7 Rail
Colt AR6720 / Scalarworks LDM / DD Omega 7 Rail

Scalarworks Patch and LDM with some Gear:

TAG Gladiator / Scalarwoks LDM & Patch / Colt AR6720
TAG Gladiator / Scalarwoks LDM & Patch / Colt AR6720

Here is a link to my initial thoughts on the Scalarworks LDM/micro mount: Scalarworks-LDM-Mount-Initial-Thoughts

Duncan.

Scalarworks LDM/micro Mount, Initial Thoughts

The generous guys at Scalarworks (scalarworks.com) were kind enough to send me one of their 1/3 Low Drag Mounts (LDM)  for Aimpoint Micro’s to review. I have been following the LDM development for a while and was very interested in the mount. It’s lightweight, skeleton construction seamed perfect for a lightweight fast carbine.  I wanted to get my quick, initial thoughts out and post some pictures.

Scalarworks
Scalarworks
Scalarworks LDM Aimpoint Micro Mount
Scalarworks LDM Aimpoint Micro Mount

I have to say, after opening the packaging and getting my hands on the LDM, I was extremely happy.  This thing is light. It felt like it weighed less than the small cardboard box it came in. I immediately mounted it up on a Colt AR6720 and was very pleased. I really like the scalloped thumbwheel construction,  used to mount the LDM. Also, the LDM just looks badass.

Scalarworks LDM
Scalarworks LDM / Left Side
Scalarworks LDM / Right side
Scalarworks LDM / Right Side

Construction and mounting the LDM  is rock solid, lightweight and low profile.  I have several of the popular / well built / reliable micro mounts, and on initial inspection of the Scalarworks LDM, I can say it does not disappoint.

Colt AR6720 w/ Scalarworks LDM
Colt AR6720 w/ Scalarworks LDM

The Aimpoint Micro seems to be floating in the air over the receiver with this mount. I am eagerly waiting getting on the range with the LDM. Some very minor modifications have been made to the LDM mounts, due to user feedback and I think the LDM is looking like a rock solid piece of gear.  As soon as I get some rounds down range, I will report back with an in-depth review.

Some more of our pictures of the LDM/micro mount can bee seen here: Scalarwoks-LDM/micro-Mount Pictures

You can see more pictures of the LDM mount at Scalarworks Facebook page (Scalarworks Facebook).

Duncan.

Colt LE6920-OEM1 & OEM2

Let’s take a quick look at two new offerings from Colt in the LE6920-OEM1 and LE6020-OEM2 models. Several places have these listed and they are in the Colt 2015 catalog, but no one currently has them in stock. They should be available and hitting the market after Shot Show. The OEM’s come without a stock, handguards, trigger guard and BUIS. Now, you might be thinking, what is the big deal with the OEM models? If you are new to the AR15 platform they might not be for you, but if you already have a few ARs you can see the benefits.

Colt LE6920-OEM1 & OEM2
Colt LE6920-OEM1 & OEM2

#1) It’s a Colt, you know what you are getting, (proven reliability), enough said. #2) I currently have several stocks, handguards , grips, rail systems and BUIS laying around. Most of us do as we are constantly getting new accessory products to try out. #3) The MRSP is just under 800 dollars. That means you will probably be able to get an OEM1 or OEM2 in the mid 600 dollar range once they start hitting the street. Slap on the extra parts you have laying around and you have a new standard configuration Colt LE6920 for under 700 dollars with the OEM1.

Colt LE6920 OEM1
Colt LE6920-OEM1

The LE6920-OEM2 is the real winner here, with the factory pinned FSB / Gas System that has been milled down to a low profile gas block. The delta ring has not been added, leaving just the barrel nut and no handguard cap behind the FSB. The OEM2 is screaming for you to slap on an extended Free Float (FF) rail system of your choice. If you choose a rail system designed to mount directly to the mil-spec barrel nut, (i.e. Centurion C4, Fortis or Midwest), you simply put it directly on. No removal of the flash hider or FSB is needed. This saves you time and money, while keeping the reliability of factory gas system in place. If you choose a propriety barrel nut FF rail system, you still get the benefit of the factory gas system, you save money not having to replace it with an unpinned low profile gas block or have the FSB milled down.

Colt LE6920 OEM2
Colt LE6920-OEM2

Hopefully the OEM’s will be available soon. I think these will be one of the best “Bang for the Buck” items, especially when most of us strip off the factory accessories anyway. The LE6920-OEM2 is on my list of next purchases.

Duncan.

Update:

A few days after we posted this article, Larry Vickers did a quick video of the Colt LE6920-OEM1 and OEM2 offerings at Shot Show 2015. Check out the video bellow.

Duncan’s Best of 2014

Here are a few of my favorite products of 2014. They are in no particular order.

M&P Shield,  without safety:

After the first of the year disappointment in the G42 being a .380, the new M&P Shield stepped in to fill the single stack 9mm role everyone was wanting. Smith & Wesson quickly capitalized by finally listening to what most had said about the Shield over the last few years. Mainly, many wanted the Shield to be offered without a safety, to operate more like the M&P Full Size models and a Glock.  I picked up the new Shield offering mid-year and it basically goes with me every day. The Shield had a few hiccups when first released and some recently. These issues have been fixed by Smith & Wesson and the Shields are very reliable. One thing I found very interesting, is when I fired the 9mm Shield and the G42 together, I did not feel a lot of recoil difference.

S&W M&P Shield /no safety
S&W M&P Shield /no safety

Lancer L5 AWM Magazines:

If you have followed us for a while, you know my personal stock up/go to magazines are USGI with Magpul followers and L-Plates. In 2014 I found amazing deals on Lancer L5 Advanced Warfighter Magazines (AWM) at USGI prices so I jumped on them.  The Lancer L5 AWM is (In my Opinion)  the best magazine to use for Duty/Defensive purposes. A true 30 round capacity polymer magazine with the strength of wraparound steel feed lips. Most of the popular polymer magazines will crack, over time, around the feed lips. With the Lancer’s this is a non-issue. Price was always the only reason I did not buy a lot of Lancer’s. In 2014 Lancer L5 AWM’s became my go to magazine.

Lancer L5 AWM Smoke Translucent
Lancer L5 AWM Smoke/Translucent

Surefire X300 Weapon Light:

Several of the LR staff have bugged me to get a Surefire X300 over the last few years. As with everything I get, price is always a factor, as I have multiple defensive weapons and it’s hard to get several firearms equipped with a weapon light when they are expensive.  The Streamlight TLR-1 is usually what I like to use. I purchase a Surefire X300 specifically to mount on one of my AR-15’s and I am glad I did. The Surefire X300 is the best weapon mounted light I have used on an AR-15. It is a little more user friendly on the AR, has a longer distance more focused beam and has a little more lumens than the TLR-1’s I normally use. On a patrol rifle, for my specific purposes, the Surefire X300 is the best weapon mounted light I have used to date. It has just the right combination of function and light output, for both outdoor and indoor use.

SureFire X300 Weapon Light
SureFire X300 Weapon Light

Colt AR15-A4 Lightweight LE Carbine (AR6720):

The low prices on AR15’s have been great in 2014. At the beginning of the year I purchased a Colt AR6720. It is one of those AR’s that made me say, ” Why did I wait so long to get it”. You find yourself wondering how a pencil barrel can really make that much of a difference. Once you get it in your hands, it just feels right.  The 6720 has all of the things you want in a reliable lightweight Carbine. It is lightweight, fast, smooth, accurate, fun to shoot and most importantly, it has the quality and features you expect in a duty/defensive carbine. I really purchased the 6720 for my wife and she absolutely loves it, but I find myself wanting to steal it. (looserounds.com / colt-lightweight-ar6720-carbine)

Colt AR6720 Lightwieght LE CArbine
Colt AR6720 Lightwieght LE CArbine

Aimpoint Micro T1/H1:

For the second year in a row, I have to mention the Aimpoint Micro’s. I have slowly replaced all of my older 30mm (M2, ML2, ML3) Aimpoint’s. They are simply, small, fast, rugged, reliable, lightweight and have unmatched battery life. There is not much more that I can say that is not already out there. Aimpoint is simply the best RDS and I feel the micro’s are the best within the Aimpoint line.

Aimpoint Micro  T1/H1(RDS)
Aimpoint Micro T1/H1(RDS)

Kinetic Concepts Tactical MOLLE-Link:

For me, the Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) MOLLE-Link system, has to be my favorite and I think most innovative products this year. It is one of those things that is so simple yet so effective and makes you wonder why it took so long for someone to think of it. The MOLLE-Link system allowes a low profile ability to mount Kydex holsters, magazine and accessory pouches directly to MOLLE webbing, with no bulky accessory attachments.  The KCT MOLLE-Link products are easy to quickly mount/remove and are extremely secure. Great product and idea from KCT. (looserounds.com / kinetic-concepts-tactical-molle-link-holsters)

Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) MOLLE-Link
Kinetic Concepts Tactical (KCT) MOLLE-Link

Duncan.

Colt Lightweight AR6720 Carbine

This is my (very short) opinion on the Colt AR6720 Lightweight LE Carbine.

I constantly have people asking my opinion of what basic AR type rifle is best for them, to use for home defense and/or duty or patrol rifle use. ” Should I get a Colt or equivalent M4 type carbine?” Many who ask me these questions are my current coworkers, officers I have worked with in law enforcement and people I have trained or train with. One thing we can all agree on at Loose Rounds is Colt is the way to go when looking for a duty AR15 type carbine. Whether you want a plinker, a hard use training, home defense or duty carbine, the Colt AR15-A4 Lightweight LE Carbine is one of the best. As with all Colt rifles, you know you are getting the  (“Mil-Spec”) features and HPT/MPI testing of the important individual parts in the 6720.

Colt AR-15A4 Lightweight LE Carbine
Colt AR-15A4 Lightweight LE Carbine

I have used several variants of the AR15 platform for duty use in semi auto and full auto versions. These range from; The standard Colt M4 14.5″ Carbine (LE6921/ RO977), LE 16″ Carbine (LE6920), 11.5″ Commando (LE6933/R0933) and Government Carbine (AR6520). When I look at an all around purpose carbine, that can fill multiple roles, I think of the Colt AR6720. The Colt AR6720 has been out since 2009 and was a request by a distributor (Clydes) for Colt to update the 6520 Government Carbine. It is basically a 6520 Gov. Carbine (LW Gov barrel) with an M4 marked flat top upper with M4 feed ramps.

Colt AR6720 Light weight LE Carbine
Colt AR6720 Lightweight LE Carbine

The AR6720, in my opinion, is the best all around performer in the AR15 carbine patrol setting. You have the reliability, accuracy, and modularity you have come to expect from the AR15 platform. For me the AR6720 seams to handle just right. The handling and transitions in movement of the 6720 are awesome.  The carbine seams to be a seamless extension of your arms and fingers. It is a joy to shoot. It is the most well balanced, fast and easy handling  16″ AR I have used.  For me, handles like the familiar 11.5″ commando, just with a longer barrel.  The stock weight comes in right at 6.12 lbs. With the (MIL-B-11595E CMV) Chrome Lined 1/7 twist barrel in 5.56mm, it will handle any ammo you want to put down range.  If you choose the right accessories and enhancements, you will not add to much to the weight. I have owned numerous AR carbines and the 6720 is one of my favorites. It just might be my favorite.

The only complaint, some people may have, is the 6720 does not have an “F” marked FSB. This is a non-issue. The FSB comes with a taller front sight post, making up for the lower shelf on the FSB, for zeroing with any BUIS you choose.

Barrel / FSB /FSP
Barrel / FSB /FSP

I have chosen to set my 6720 up, in the following configuration, per my personal preferences.  With a loaded 30 round magazine, I am still within the 6 lbs. range. This maximizes performance and handling of my patrol carbine needs out to 200 yards, although the Colt AR6720 is very capable of excellent performance well past 200.

  • GG&G MAD BUIS
  • Tango Down Battle Grip
  • Daniel Defense Omega 7 Rail
  • BCM Gunfighter Charging Handle (Mod4)
  • Aimpoint Micro w/ADM mount
  • Tactical Link Z-360 mount and Convertible Sling
  • Lancer L5 Translucent AWM magazine
Colt 6720 w/ DD Omega 7 rail, Aimpoint Micro
Colt 6720 w/ DD Omega 7 rail, Aimpoint Micro

At current prices, you can find the AR6720 in the 800 dollar range. I feel there is no argument or justification you can make, if your in the marked for a serious lightweight Defensive/Duty carbine, to buy another carbine at these prices. For a basic AR carbine, the Colt AR6720 is probably the best lightweight carbine purchase you can make. There are numerous articles on the accuracy of the 6720 and we have shown you how accurate a Colt carbine can be here on Loose Rounds. The 6720 is fast and smooth, and it will make the hits when it counts. If I was still patrolling on the street, the Colt AR6720 would be in my cruiser and it would be my go to patrol carbine.

Duncan.

Here is a good video with more info and shooting, by Mrgunsngear, on the AR6720:

Buying LE Trade-In / Used Glocks & What to Look For

One of the most reliable firearms you can decide to buy is a police/LE trade-in or used Glock, if you know what to look for. When looking at one of these used Glocks there are important things you need to look for and replace, if you purchase one.  In this article, I will breakdown some of the key things to look for and avoid, as well as the critical parts that must be replaced after your purchase. A gun store will not let you strip the gun completely down to its small internal parts so you have to understand what to look for, to insure you are getting what you want. This will cover only Gen2 and some Gen3 Glocks, there is a reason for that, and you will see why as we go along.

Gen3 G22 & Gen2 G19
Gen3 G22 & Gen2 G19

Advantages:

First let’s talk about the advantages of buying a police trade-in or used Glock. When you understand what to look for in a used Gen2 or Gen3 Glock, you know you are buying the most reliable and longest serving generations of the Glock design. You are avoiding the sometimes problematic issues with the newer Gen3 and Gen4 designs and you are hopefully spending a lot less on the firearm.  On average you can get the trade-in /used Gocks in the Low to Mid-300 dollar range. I recently helped a co-worker select an excellent condition LE trade-in G23. He spent $314.00 on the firearm, I put in $20.00 worth of parts and it was good to go.  Another huge advantage and one of the main reasons to buy the older Glocks, is no MIM parts. The Gen2 and select Gen3 Glocks have investment cast /machine tool steel locking blocks, extractors and firing pins. You are getting a more robustly built Glock, with higher quality parts in those key areas, vs. the newer Glocks.

Serial Numbers:

You must pay close attention to serial numbers when looking at used Glocks. This will serve several purposes, unique to a Gen2 or Gen3 Glock.  The serial number will help you identify the approximate date of manufacturer and what to look for, depending on it being a Gen2 or Gen3 gun. Look to see if the Serial numbers on the Slide, Frame and Barrel match. If the serial numbers on any three of these only contain numbers, then they have been replace or are aftermarket if they are not OEM Glock.

CGN - Gen2 Mid-1997 / FCM - Gen3 Late- 2002
CGN – Gen2 Mid-1997 / FCM – Gen3 Late- 2002

Gen2 Glocks

Gen2 guns have had several mandatory part changes and upgrades, depending on the approximate date of manufacturer. This will also help you understand how old the firearm is. All Gen2 guns will have the tool steel parts we have already talked about, unless someone changed them out.  In the 2002 Glock armorers guide, replacement of the old slide lock spring to the upgraded slide lock spring is recommended. All Gen2 guns will need this part upgraded.  Some Gen2 guns that have a black trigger bar will need the Six-Part upgrade.  Serial Numbers starting from AA through SL (depending on model) may need this upgrade, if not already done. (see Six-Part Upgrade: below for more information) If you stay in the three letter serial number range starting at (AAA###) and up, you should be ok as far as the Six-Part upgrade is concerned.

Gen3 Glocks

With the Gen3 guns, you want to look at the serial number closely to make sure it was made before Early to Mid-2009. As long as you are under serial number range (MSZ###) or do not have the dip extractor you are probably ok as far as MIM parts.  Sometime in Early to Mid-2009, Glock started using the MIM locking blocks, extractors and firing pins. There may be some mixed MIM/non-MIM parts in the (M) serial number range, so be aware of that. The only required upgrade/replacement part in pre-2002 Gen3’s, is the replacement of the old slide lock spring to the upgraded slide lock spring, as mention above.  2002-2009 Gen3 guns will not require any part upgrades. important to note: if the serial number on the frame starts in the (EAK### through EVR###) range, the rear slide rails are prone to breakage. Glock recommends those frames be sent in for replacement.

Gen2 Extractor / Old Gen3 Extractor / MIM Dip Extractor
Gen2 Extractor / Old Gen3 Extractor / Dip (MIM) Extractor
Non-MIM locking Block (right), MIM Locking Block (left)
Non-MIM locking Block (left), MIM Locking Block (right)

Wear:

There are some key areas of wear that you can look for, on trade-in /used Glocks. This will help you identify if the firearm has been used excessively or minimally, depending on caliber. Your .40 cal and .357 sig Glock will show more wear in these areas than a 9mm or 45ACP will, due to them being harder on the firearm.  Add all of these indicators up to make a decision on how used you think the firearm is. It will really help if you ask the gun shop, if you can removed the slide (field Strip) the firearm, to inspect the gun. I do not buy any used firearms unless I am able to do this. Bellow are examples of normal wear on 9mm and .40 cal Glocks, nothing extremely heavy.

1. Barrel Wear Areas

Barrel chatter marks will be visible on the outside of the barrel. The top of the barrel chamber will also have wear marks where it makes contact with the top of the slide. The stronger / more pronounced the wear in these areas will indicate use.

Barrel Wear G22 / G19 & G22 barrels / Slide Barrel Wear
Barrel Wear G22 / G19 & G22 barrels / Slide Barrel Wear

2. Slide Wear Areas

The outside slide condition will indicate carry use. The inside of the slide will show wear in two particular areas. The inside top of the slide will indicate wear, where the top of the barrel makes contact with the slide as it reciprocates and on the slide rails on each side of the barrel chamber.  Heavy peening wear on the slide rails slightly in front of the barrel chamber area indicates heavy use.

Slide Rail peening G19 / Inside Slide Wear Gen2 G19 / Inside Slide Wear Gen3 G22
Slide Rail peening G19 / Inside Slide Wear Gen2 G19 / Inside Slide Wear Gen3 G22

3. Frame Wear

You want to look at the frame carefully to inspect it for cracks or any major damage. While the frame is polymer (plastic), wear on the outside of the frame is not an indicator of firing use, only carry use. A lot of the LE trade-in guns are carried more than shot.

Frames-Right & Left Sides
Frames-Right & Left Sides
Dust Cover Frame Crack
Dust Cover Frame Crack

Replacement Part Recommendations:

After selecting the used Glock and purchasing it using the information above, I would recommend purchasing an OEM Glock Spring Kit and have it instaulled. This serves two purposes. (1) If you have a Gen2 or Gen3 with the old slide lock spring, it is in the kit. (2) The spring kit replaces all six of the springs in the firearm and will insure that all springs are fresh as true round count will be unknown. Replacing the main recoil spring is also a good idea when round count is unknown. Since the main recoil spring and slide lock spring are in the kit, this is the best purchase as it will only cost you around $20.00 dollars. Most Glock parts are very inexpensive, if you identify any weird after market parts you are not sure about, replace them.

Spring Kit / Old Slide Lock Spring / New Slide Lock Spring
Spring Kit / Old Slide Lock Spring / New Slide Lock Spring

.40 Caliber Gen2 Glocks:

If you are buying an early Gen2 .40 caliber Glock, usually pre 1995, you will need to be on the lookout for the 4340 ejector.  The 4340 ejector was replaced with the 1882 ejector. Some confuse the 4340 ejector as a broken ejector, due to its short appearance.  The 4340 ejector was replaced, as it puts unnecessary stress on the extractor and due to late ejection can cause case deformation and crimping. This can also cause stove pipe issues.  Over time the use of the 4240 ejector will cause the extractor to break. If you find a .40 cal Glock with a 4340 ejector, you may want to pass on it. If you buy a Glock with the 4340 ejector, replace it with a new Trigger Mechanism Housing with the 1882 ejector.

4340 ejector & 1882 ejector
4340 ejector & 1882 ejector

Six-Part Upgrade:

It is important to note this upgrade is extremely rare to come across, as it was identified over 20 years ago. Some  Gen1 ‘s and early Gen2’s may require the Glock Six-Part upgrade as mention above. If you identify the Glock is one that needs this upgrade, I would suggest passing on that particular Glock as replacing the firing pin and extractor with new MIM parts would defeat one of the main reasons of getting the older/used Glock. If you are looking at a trade-in /used gun, you can easily pull the slide back and look at the trigger bar. If it is solid black and not just dirty from use, it will need the upgrade. This consists of replacing the (trigger bar, firing pin, firing pin safety & spring, extractor and spring-load bearing).

(Top / Right-Side of Frame) Silver Trigger Bar, no upgrade needed
(Top / Right-Side of Frame) Silver Trigger Bar, no upgrade needed

Conclusion / Final Thoughts:

Most police/LE trade-in Glocks have been maintained by a department armorer and will probably have the upgraded parts already in them, from years ago. Used Glocks that where in private hands, will more than likely be the ones that need minor part replacement here and there. I have purchased several LE trade-in /used Glocks. Two of my main personal defensive firearms are a late Gen2 G19 and an early Gen3 G22. These have been my go to Glocks and I prefer the quality of the older Glocks compared to the new offerings. Glock does not care if you are the original owner. They have a lifetime guarantee and if you ever have a problem, simply call them and they will take care of it on their dime. Information on Glock serial numbers can be found here: (glocktalk.com Serial Number) as long as it stays up. If you remember to look for the key things talked about here, you will be walking away with a excellent Glock, that will be very dependable and reliable for years to come.

Duncan