My Colt 6940 FDE

Some time back Colt did a limited run of FDE anodized LE6920 and LE6940 models. I’ve heard there was something like 300 of these tan 6940s made, and 1500 of the 6920s.

Shawn was a pretty early adopter of the monolithic upper model of the 6940. He wrote a nice write about the 6940 back in 2012. You can see it here. When the FDE 6940 came out, he picked one up and switched to it.

An old picture of Shawn’s FDE 6940

I always thought how he has his rifle set up is pretty practical. So years later when I picked up a LE6945, a shorter barreled 6940, I set it up similarly.

My LE6945

Every so often I would see one of those limited run FDE 6940s come up for sale. Often $3000+. Insane.
Then I saw one for sale just a little over what I thought was reasonable, so I snatched it up.

This rifles comes out of the box ready for use, it even included a nice accessory kit I teased about here.

The kit comes with 2 mags, sling, cleaning kit, ladder covers, manual, a vertical forward grip, and a QD sling swivel.

Now I could write about this rifles performance, reliability, etc. But being it is a Colt, I think you what is going to be said. Now sometime down the road I plan to do some accuracy testing, but that hasn’t happened yet.

The 6940 has two heat shields in the hand guards. One above the gas tube and one at the bottom to help protect the shooters hand from heat when rapid firing.

The bottom rail is removable when you press a recessed button.
A 6940 has a 16″ M4 profile barrel. A notch in the upper receiver allows for a M203 grenade launcher to be mounted.

The 6940 model is a great gun, but I think it has a similar problem the FN SCAR has. It is a product of an older time. Now people want longer slick hand-guards, greater molecularity, etc. It is great at what it is, but you are limited to what you can change on it.

So what did I change on mine?

The Magpul MOE stock and grip on the rifle are fine, but I replaced them with the CTR (with extended pad) and A2 grip as I prefer. I removed the Magpul winter trigger guard and replaced it with a standard trigger guard (why?). A Tango Down stubby VFG was added to the hand guard. This rifle will normally wear an Aimpoint T-1 with a 300m zero. A KAC Ambi-Safety & Norgon Ambi-Catch aid in making the rifle more ambidextrous.

Eventually I’d like to swap out the Magpul rear sight for a KAC 2-600m sight. I’m also going to add a Surefire Warcomp so I can mount my silencer. I’d like to add Surefire Scout Light, once I can find another one cheap. Other than that, it is as it will be. I just need to shoot it more.

Inland MFG M3 Carbine

We have seen a few really nifty M1 carbines out of Inland the last few years. It was just a matter of time before they offered us the version the least known or seen. The M3 was the variant done up to mount a huge active IR night vision “sniper” scope and a huge battery to run it. It didn’t really pan out at the time but it’s existence did mean the carbine Colt version of the M16 would forever be known as the M4.

Now, if you add some normal day time optic to the handy little carbine that is another story. Above you can see the base/ring mounting system Inland has developed for the mounting of optics. Simply put, the base uses the redfield/leupold turn in front ring and dual windage screw rear ring system. any rings you want to buy that work in this manner will fit and work. And it works really well. I chose to put a vintage Weaver K4 on the gun as it is more evocative of the time period this gun had its short heyday.

The machine work Inland put in on this is kinda of amazing. My friend and partner in crime when it comes to our more insane long range shooting ideas is an experienced machinist and when I showed it to him, we both at first thought the base was part of the receiver and machined into shape. It took a surefire light and a closer look to see that it was indeed not part of the gun. It really is a beautiful job.

One of the things that sticks out on the M3 was the cone flash suppressor. Inland did not forget this iconic attachment. And it is attachable. As you can see above it is a simple system. You can chose to put it on or leave it off. I found it did not really impact accuracy any amount I could determine while on and shooting at ranges the 30 carbine round was meant for. There was slight changes when shooting with our without though and depending on the mood or whichever gun you may have, the amount of re-zeroing could vary. I did not bother to re adjust the optic as it was less than 3/4 inch impact change and I was shooting for groups and location on the target did not matter to me.

As expected, being able to use some magnification helped with group size at longer ranges. The Inland M1s have been accurate for me over years since starting to test them.

Group above was shot off bags from bench at 100 yards. The group is a 10 round group and the one flyer I offer no excuse for other than I just touched it off without being ready. The group below was fired at the head at 150 yards.

All groups were fired using federal soft point LEO ammo. I have no idea where I ever got this ammo from but it is pretty accurate. Unfortunately I used all I had left for this test. Target below was fired at center body of target from 300 yards. With the optic it was pretty easy. It is still a carbine meant for combat but I can’t imagine anyone with any sense really having much to complain about its performance at this range. But I am sure some one will in the comments.

Hey, what more could you ask for considering the limitations of the round? Pair the optic with a Korean era 30 round magazine and you got one heck of a neat little carbine for something. Walking around the farm shooting ground hogs or maybe short range coyote gun. With proper bullet selection maybe even white tail at shorter ranges. I don’t know, your imagination is the limit. It doesn’t need justification if you want it. if you think it’s neat then buy one. The quality won’t let you down, nor it’s looks.

I apologize for not having a full glamour shot of the gun with optic for this review. Something went badly wrong with my camera during the uploading process. The camera decided to die after 9 years and it took the remaining pictures with it. This includes the rest of the groups shots and the glamour shots of the gun posed with period militaria collectibles and all that crap you are used to seeing when I do these. That is also why this review seems shorter than normal. It’s not just your imagination or my laziness. I have been trying to recover those photos and if so I will update this review ASAP. To add to that this was the first time I didn’t bother to back up every picture by taking the same pictures with my Iphone just in case.

Colt Goody Bag

I wasn’t a Colt fan until after I met Shawn. I had owned most of the other brands at that point and didn’t see the point of owning a Colt. Having met Shawn, his rabid Colt fanboyism rubbed off on me. Now most of the AR15s I own are Colt.

Why? Simply because I have had less trouble with Colt than other brands. Not “no trouble” but less trouble.

Anyways, I bought another Colt AR last year, and finally got it in this week. I’ll talk about it more later, but here is a teaser.

I like how the Colt used include a nice kit with each AR15. However in 2013 as a cost cutting measure they changed and reduced the kit to help keep the rifles price competitive with all the cheap low end ARs out there. I believe this kit was made back in 2012, as the kits were changing but not cut down yet.

This particular kit came with:

  • 2 30 round P-Mags
  • Cleaning Kit
  • Silent Sling
  • Manual
  • QD Sling Socket
  • Magpul RVG Vertical Forward Grip
  • 3 FDE Ladder Covers

In one way I wish more firearms would come with full kits of support equipment. But the simple truth of the matter is that most of us won’t use most of what comes in these kits. By leaving out accessories Colt was able to shave down the price a bit, and we can then buy what ever we want to use separately.

Build a 9mm AR15 Pistol, I don’t like it.

Bottom Line Up Front: 9mm AR moves more than 5.56 ARs, made me not like the 9mm pistol configuration.

Long rambling explanation below:

Recoil has multiple components. There is the muzzle rise AKA muzzle flip. There is the rearwards force. There is also the intensity or how drawn out that recoil is. Some guns are a push and some are snappy.

For example, some say that .40 S&W has less recoil than .45 ACP, but .40 is snappier due to the recoil being in a shorter time which can make it harder to control.

The Colt pattern 9mm AR15s are blow back operated. Because of this they have heavier bolts and buffers giving them a good bit more mass moving during the recoil of the firearm.

So these blow back 9mm AR15s (well this does apply to all blow back guns) have a more violent recoil then the rarer pistol caliber carbines that are not blow back.

Note that I said “more violent”, not just more or bad. These 9mm ARs are still pleasant to shoot, especially due to the greatly decreased muzzle blast.

So where am I going with this? When I finally got out and shot this 9mm AR pistol I found it moved a good bit with each shot. Shooting accurately was easy. But shooting fast wasn’t.

I was surprised at how well I shot the pistol off hand. Using the iron sights and also an Aimpoint, I was easily shooting tight groups, nearly cloverleafs at 5-20 yards. In hindsight I really should have kept that target. But the gun moved so much off target with each shot I was really off-put by the whole experience.

Now if I had a pistol brace it would probably be a whole different story.

Anyways. I decided I am going to sell this 10.5 inch 9mm upper, and just replace it with a full 9mm rifle. Maybe a Colt 6951. And I have already swapped the pistol over into a 5.56 configuration.