Tag Archives: Colt 6920

Gear Sector GS-2P Slings

When looking for a quality sling for an AR15 type weapon, there are many different sling manufacturers out there. If you are like me and have several AR15’s and want to outfit all of them, this could cost you quite a bit of money. I personally want my slings to perform at a certain level and you must weigh what your rifles are used for. One thing that is always a concern for me, is not sacrificing quality for a cheap/ low cost sling. When I purchase an AR15 or other long gun, one of the first things I think about is getting a quality sling. A sling for your rifle is like a holster for your handgun, you simply must have one if you want to run your carbine effectively. It took me a long time and a lot of trial and error to find a sling that would be my all purpose go to sling.  Whenever I buy a rifle, the Gear Sector GS-2P Sling is the first accessory I think about and the GS-2P more than fits the needs.

FDE/Foliage Green GS-2P slings
FDE/FG GS-2P slings

I have been running Gear Sector slings for over five (5) years now, mainly the GS-2P Sling. The GS-2P has all of the features I look for in a two point sling and some unique features that are Gear Sector specific. One of the main reasons I looked at the GS-2P was the price. For the quality and features the sling provides, at what I consider a very low price point, the GS-2P allows you to outfit several rifles with an extremely good sling.

FDE/FG GS-2P slings
FDE/FG GS-2P slings
Pink GS-2P on Colt AR6720
Pink GS-2P on Colt AR6720

Sling Function / Features:

The GS-2P is an adjustable two point sling.  A two point adjustable sling will do just about everything you need a sling to do, whether you are using it on a Law Enforcement Patrol Rifle, home defense rifle or training/range/fun shooting rifle. I have used the GS-2P slings on duty rifles and on my personal rifles. It is built to allow the user to adjust the slack in/out on the sling for various rifle movements. If you are familiar with the Vickers Sling, the concept is much the same. Adjust the sling to fit with the pull tab portion of the sling all the way out. To release slack in the sling, for a weak side transition, pull the buckle back and release the slack in the sling, then dip your support arm out of the sling and transition the rifle to your weak-side. The sling will remain around the back of your neck.  To transition the rifle back to strong side, hook your support arm back through the sling and pull the pull tab portion of the sling picking up all the slack.

Releasing Slack on GS-2P
Releasing Slack on GS-2P
Transition to Weak-side w/GS-2P
Transition to Weak-side w/GS-2P
Taking up slack on GS-2P
Taking up slack on GS-2P

Sling Construction:

One unique thing you notice about the Gear Sector Slings is they are 1” in width. You might think this would make the sling uncomfortable or that it might dig into you but this is not the case.  I find the sling to be very smooth and fast. The sling is made out of MIL-W-5625 Tubular nylon webbing, which allows the sling to glide across gear and equipment. I have never had an issue with the GS-2P snagging on anything. The sling hardware is ITW GhillieTex brand hardware and the sling is double box stitched. Another plus about the Gear Sector slings is the nylon construction.  This particular nylon can be heated with a lighter to fuse frayed ends.  Once you mount the sling adapters you can cut off excess ends and melt/seal the ends.  This insures your sling will not fray or unravel.

Modular Weapon Adapter/Accessories:

With the way the GS-2P is built, with quick release buckles at the ends of the sling, you can customize the GS-2P sling to any attachment point on your rifle, using the Gear Sector Modular Weapon Adapters.  These adapters are inexpensive and you can pick the adapters to fit the mounts you may already have or want to purchase for your rifle. I have also purchased extra adapters to mount on rifles so I can move the GS-2P from one rifle to another.  This allows for one sling to be used with several rifles.  You simply use the quick release buckles to remove the main body of the sling from one rifle and snap it onto another.

Modular Weapon Adapters
Modular Weapon Adapters
FG GS-2P on Colt LE6920
GS-2P on Colt LE6920

As you can see in a few of these pictures, I can move the main body of the sling from a 5.56mm rifle to a .22lr rifle, without having to completely un-mount the sling adapter attachments points. Simply leave the adapters hard mounted to the rifles and transition the main body of the sling over. Although I prefer to have a sling for every rifle, this is a way to lower your cost but still use several rifles, until you get the funds to purchase another sling. You can also buy adapters to quickly move the sling to a completely different platform (i.e. an AK variant). Buy a snap hook adapter for your AK and you have one sling that will work with two different rifle systems.

Adapter on M&P15-22
Adapters on M&P15-22
FDE GS-2P on LE6920
FDE GS-2P on LE6920

For an AR15 with Mil Spec Stock, I like to use the Gear Sector Stock Adapter.  This adapter lines the sling parallel to the bore of the rifle and is very comfortable while transitioning from low ready/patrol carry to the ready/firing position.

Stock Adapters
Stock Adapters

For a Magpul MOE, CTR or any other stock with multiple mounting slots, you can just use the supplied standard adapter to mount the sling to the stock. If you have QD points on a stock or rail, you can buy the QD adapters or add QD’s to the standard adapters. Gear Sector also has a full line of picatinny rail mounts and sling endplate mounts, that are specifically made for the Gear Sector 1″ slings. In a few of the pictures in this article, I am using a Gear Sector Rail Mount 1″ Loop in conjunction with KAC rail panels, to mount the GS-2P.

Modular Weapon Adapters
Adapters on / MOE stock / Tactical Link Z-360 mount / Daniel Defense rail
GS-2P on MOE stock & Daniel Defense rail
GS-2P on MOE stock & Daniel Defense rail

Final Thoughts:

There is nothing not to like about the GS-2P. It will do everything you want an adjustable two point sling to do. In fact, at the low price point and countless adapter mounting options, the GS-2P does it as well and in my opinion better, than most. There are several slings out there that I really like but most of those are pushing twice the cost of the GS-2P. I like to run the GS-2P’s hard and my older GS-2P’s looks just as good as the newer ones I have. I feel a two point adjustable sling is the minimum and in most cases the standard sling for a multipurpose carbine. If you are looking for a sling that will fill your LE Duty rifle, Personal Defense rifle or Range/Training rifle needs, the GS-2P is a sling you should take a long hard look at.

Duncan.

Umbrella Corporation Weapons Research Group, Grip-23

Several months ago Umbrella Corporation Weapons Research Group (www.ucwrg.com) provided us with a few of their Grip-23 AR15 grips. I was very happy to have the opportunity to get my hands on them as they are hard to get. Jaime, at UCWRG was a pleasure to deal with and you could tell their customer service was a top priority.

UCWRG Grip-23
UCWRG Grip-23, FDE & Black

First impressions:

Several things interested me in the Grip-23. Our friends at Tactical Link (www.tacticallink.com) got me interested in UCWRG. I saw the Grip-23 showing up on rifles, in a lot of Tactical Link’s pictures, on their Facebook page. I wanted to try some of the new grips that were coming out with a more vertical grip. I have had some wrist issues and felt that the more vertical grip would help me with those issues. At just twenty dollars,  the Grip-23 is a lot less than other big name grips. After receiving two Grip-23’s from UCWRG, one in FDE and another in Black, I mounted them on two of my rifles.

Initially I was worried about liking the grip. Magpul Design Group was consulted about AR15 grip design and several prototypes resulted from this information. I have never been a fan of the Magpul grips and was apprehensive about any influence the consulting had in the Design of the Grip-23. Once I mounted the Grip-23, I immediately felt the benefits of the more vertical angle of the grip. It is a no frills, simple, no B.S. design.

UCWRG Grip-23, FDE & Black.
UCWRG Grip-23, FDE & Black.
USWRG Grip-23 FDE, Magpul FDE L-Plate, Tactical Link Z-360 Patriot Brown.
USWRG Grip-23 FDE, Magpul FDE L-Plate, Tactical Link Z-360 Patriot Brown.

Grip-23 Ergonomics:

When you look at the Grip-23, you notice it has an extended beaver tail or (Tang) on the grip, much like the Magpul grips but the Grip-23’s is larger.  This larger, thicker tang pushes the web of the hand down farther than other grips. The benefit to this is a straight pull in the trigger.  The index finger/trigger finger is parallel to the bore of the rifle and this allows a straight to the rear pull on the trigger.  This index helps with accuracy and quicker follow up shots. With traditional angled grips, I find that my trigger finger is coming down at a slight angle. If you have some kind of match trigger like a Geissele in your AR, you will definitely see the benefits to the improved  ergonomics.

Another thing I noticed with the better index, was the reach on the magazine release. The lower hand grip, more vertical angle and parallel index  allows you to get a full finger pad on the magazine release. This gave a positive no doubt press to release the magazine, on a reload.

UCWRG Grip-23, Grip.
UCWRG Grip-23, Grip.
UCWRG Grip-23,  Grip Width.
UCWRG Grip-23, FDE & Black, Grip Width.

The vertical angle of the Grip-23 also lends itself to an elbow down shooting position with the fire control hand/arm.  This helps you avoid (Chicken Wing) with your strong side arm. With the more vertical  grip and elbow down hold, you can get the rifle closer into your body and control recoil better. I have had several injuries involving my wrist. With a tradition angled grips, my wrist hurts or becomes fatigued when I have to remove my support hand from the rifle.  I found with the Grip-23 I was able to support the weapon, with one hand, for longer periods of time, without my wrist hurting or forcing me to lower the rifle. This made working the charging handle and doing magazine exchanges much easier. One area that you really notice a difference in the angle of the grip, is in a low ready or hanging position. Much like if you were patrolling or doing perimeter security. It feels much more natural when holding the grip in low ready as you don’t have your wrist kinked like on a standard grip.

UCWRG Grip-23, Black, Colt LE6940.
UCWRG Grip-23 Black, on Colt LE6940.

Simplicity/Features:

As I stated in the beginning, the Grip-23 is a simple, no B.S. design. Having said that, the no fills simplicity but well thought out design is what this grip is all about.  I have never used the storage compartments in other grips and the Grip-23 happens to have no storage feature. It has a hollow open bottom like a standard A2 grip. There is no trigger gap extension, to cover up the infamous gap at the trigger guard, that you find on other grips. UCWRG understands that most users are replacing the standard trigger guard with a Magpul trigger guard or other similar manufacturer enhanced trigger guard.  The Magpul trigger guards come on most of the big name (Colt, Daniel Defense, BCM) rifle manufactures now, so the gap extension is not needed. The Grip-23 has a smooth, none aggressive texture.  After market stippling is common for those who want a more aggressive surface.

By focusing on the angle and placement of the fire control hand, in relation to the trigger and controls of the AR15 platform, UCWRG has created a grip that enhances AR15 handling performance at a very low cost. In most cases $15.00 to $20.00 less than other aftermarket grips.

UCWRG Grip-23, Black on Colt LE6920.
UCWRG Grip-23 Black, on Colt LE6920.

Overall Impressions:

I really like the UCWRG Grip-23. I think it enhances overall weapon handling and manipulation. The Grip-23 is competing heavily with my favorite go to grip at half the price. One thing you will notice in all of my pictures, there is a Tactical Link Z-360 sling mount on all of the rifles. The Grip-23 gives good separation between the grip and mount. If you like the Z-360 mounts the Grip-23 is a very nice addition in combination with the Z-360 mount.  As I continue to mess around with the Grip-23, I like the benefits of the Grip-23 more and more.  In my opinion, for the price, you will not get another grip that gives you more ergonomic and weapon handling performance than the UCWRG Grip-23. Personally, the UCWRG Grip-23 is also just damn sexy looking on a rifle. I think the Grip-23 will find it’s way on to more of my AR15’s in the future.

Duncan

Daniel Defense Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP

I recently purchased and mounted a Daniel Defense Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP on a Colt LE6920. There were several reasons I decided to go with this rail system. I have traditionally been a carbine length rail guy but  I have been looking for a long time at extended rails.

Daniel Defense Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP
Daniel Defense Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP

There are several high quality free-float rail systems on the market and choosing is hard. I had to look at several areas of my shooting grip and needs. I really did not what to choose a rail that would require me to ditch my front sight. I really like the standard F marked Front Sight Base (FSB). This made narrowing the rail system down to one that would allow the standard Front Sight Post (FSP) to be used.  I also wanted QD points built into the rails. Quickly I narrowed down the choice to either the Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP or Centurion C4 12.0 FSP rail.  Next I looked at the width of the rails.  I was familiar with the drop in Omega 7″ rail and knew the width of the Omega’s was 1.90″ and the Centurion C4’s were just over 2″ at 2.1″ . The rail height was about the same on both rails. I was able to get a good deal on the Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP and jumped on it.

IMG_20140710_185454_112
Colt LE6920 w/ DD Omega X 12.0 FSP / Surefire X300 / Aimpoint T1

Daniel Defense Rail Dimensions:

DD rails

More Rail Dimensions (width” x height”)

DD New: DDM4: 1.9″ x 2.165″

DD Omega: 1.9″ x 2.42″

DD M4: 1.94″ x 2.42″

DD Lite II: 2.06″ x 2.42″

DD RIS II: 2.23″ x 2.22″

LaRue: 2.0″ x 2.22″

Centurion C4: 2.1″ x 2.38″

KAC RAS: 2.2″ x 2.3″

Troy TRX: 2.2″ x 2.44″

Installation:

Unlike the Centurion Arms C4 rails, the Daniel Defense Omega X rails have a proprietary barrel nut and removal of the A2 flash hider, FSB, gas system and barrel nut are required. If you do not have the tools or are unwilling to have this done, look into getting the Centurion C4 rail.  The Centurion can be installed very easily without removal of most of the above mentioned parts.

Remove FSP, Gas Tube and Flash Hider and factory barrel nut, replace with Daniel Defense proprietary barrel nut
Remove FSB, Gas Tube, Flash Hider and factory barrel nut, replace with Daniel Defense proprietary barrel nut
Replace FSP, Gas Tube and Flash Hider.
Re-install FSB, Gas Tube and Flash Hider.
Install the DD upper rail on barrel nut, using carry handle to align properly
Install the DD upper rail on barrel nut, using carry handle to align properly
Install the DD lower rail on barrel nut and secure it to the upper rail with the (6) rail screws. Tighten down the (4) Allen head screws on barrel nut
Install the DD lower rail on barrel nut and secure it to the upper rail with the (6) rail screws. Tighten down the (4) Allen head screws on barrel nut
Check alignment on front of Daniel Defense Omega X 12.0 FSP Rail
Check alignment on front of Daniel Defense Omega X 12.0 FSP Rail
Check alignment of receiver and Daniel Defense Omega X FSP Rail
Check alignment of receiver and Daniel Defense Omega X FSP Rail
Check alignment of top of receiver and  Daniel Defense Omega X FSP Rail
Check alignment of top of receiver and Daniel Defense Omega X FSP Rail

My Grip:

When looking at my grip, I have always used my support hand to grip far forward with some of my fingers under the FSB. This had always been very natural for me and something I have always done. The lack of extended rail was the only thing limiting me from gripping right under the FSP. I also have a tendency to roll my thumb over the top rail or extend it forward along the side of the FSP. As I fire rounds, the FSP and barrel heat up and I naturally have to move back on the rail.

My Grip on Colt 6920 w/KAC RAS Rail
My Grip on Colt 6920 w/KAC RAS Rail

With the extended rail of the Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP, I can grip right at the FSP. This gives me consistency on my grip and facilitates my natural tendency to grip in this area. The extremely thin profile on the Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP gives me a positive grip around the rail. The Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP allows me to move my light in front of the FSP at the 12 o’clock position. This set up puts the light switch right next to my thumb. Once again allowing me to quickly operate the momentary on switch at my natural grip location. The light at this position also eliminates barrel shadow on the right or left side of your view, depending on whether the light is mounted on the right or left side of the rail.

Grip on Colt LE6920 w/Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP using Streamlight TLR-1
Grip w/Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP / Streamlight TLR-1 / Aimpont ML2

Another benefit for me, is consistency in my support hand grip with the carbine and handgun. As this is my go to defensive rifle, the Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP allows my support hand grip to very closely match the distance and grip when using a handgun. Now shooting a rifle and handgun are very different, but consistent muscle memory placement while presenting the rifle or handgun towards a threat will benefit from this. I feel this is one reason I have a natural tendency to grip a carbine farther out, (under the FSP), like I was holding  a handgun.

Grip consistency compared to handgun
Grip consistency compared to handgun
Grip consistency compared to carbine
Grip consistency compared to carbine

Conclusion:

The Daniel Defense Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP is definitely a quality upgrade for me. The benefits for my particular shooting grip and weapon manipulation is a big plus.  If you have a similar shooting grip style, the Omega X Rail 12.0 FSP or another quality FSP rail, like the Centurion Arms C4 12.0 FSP, might be for you. An extended rail gives you much more flexibility with, weapon handling and accessory choices for those of you who like to extend your grip at or past the FSP.

Duncan

Selecting a Home Defense Firearm

The topic of what firearm should I use for home defense is a question that people get a million answers on. Most of the time, your local gun store, unknowledgeable friend or people who have little training experience, will tell you a shotgun because you can’t miss. Sometimes you even get some of these same people telling you never a “high powered rifle round”, mostly referring to 223/5.56mm, it will over penetrate. And yes, always the classic answer of, whatever you feel comfortable with. In most cases all of the above answers are wrong.

When approaching the topic of what firearm you want to use for home defense, you need to be thinking about several things. Most importantly: (1). Your specific home layout. (2). Other people in the home, specifically children. These two important topics will help you answer several questions, on what firearm you are going to choose as your primary home defense weapon. When thinking about these two topics, you can answer specific round selection, accuracy, handling/ease of manipulation, important defensive accessories, (i.e. lights and sights) and accessibility. All of this will point you towards what firearm(s) will need to be selected.

Colt LE6920
Colt LE6920 / AR15

The Clear Choices:

There is no doubt that we are talking about three specific types of firearms here. These firearms are the standard for defense and have a proven track record in Law Enforcement, Military and Civilian use.

(1). A reliable full size semi auto Handgun, (Glock, S&W M&P, H&K, Sig, 1911 and others).

(2). A (Reliable) AR15 type rifle in 223/5.56mm, (i.e. Colt, BCM, Daniel Defense).

(3). A Shotgun ( i.e. Remington 870’s, Mossberg 500’s or Winchester Defender).

Now out of these choices you can probably eliminate one choice, the shotgun, right away in my opinion. I say this because once you start to answer a few of the questions stated earlier, the Shotgun is clearly the bottom of the three. The shotgun is larger, heavy, harder to maneuver in a home and impossible to fire multiple rounds one handed. I could keep going, but you get the idea. Also, racking it does not have the effect people believe it to have. Don’t get me wrong I love a good Remington 870. It’s an awesome weapon and very effective, but it has a specific place/role and you can miss with the 00 buck pellets. Contrary to what most people believe, you still have to aim with a shotgun. Modern Duty buckshot has a tighter pattern than the buckshot of 10 and 15 years ago. You will be accountable for those rounds if you miss because they will enter other rooms. Depending on the number of buckshot, it can range from eight to nine 25 cal. pellets to 32 cal. pellets, flying out of the barrel. They will pass through drywall retaining most of their mass.

Now let’s talk about why the semi-auto handgun and AR15 are arguable the two best choices. As we delve into them further, you will also see more reasons why the shotgun is the last choice, possibly not really a choice at all. My opinion is the handgun and the AR15 would serve most people the best. They are only separated by your particular home needs.

GunVault, Glock, Colt LE6920
GunVault, Glock, Colt LE6920

Handgun:

If you have to grab a firearm in a defensive situation and you have little ones at home, you most likely will need the use of one hand. You may also need a free hand to call for help, open doors, lock doors or pick up a little one. The handgun makes perfect sense in these situations. The handgun is the most compact and maneuverable firearm you can use. Once you rack it and its ready to go, you have the ability to have one hand free if needed.

You can move throughout your home in a high ready position, keeping the firearm close to your body. This will help avoid someone grabbing your firearm or pushing the muzzle down while coming around corners in the home.

One thing to keep in mind about a handgun is the rounds are larger and slower moving than a rifle round. Large slow moving rounds tend to retain more mass when going through barriers in the home, especially drywall. You do not want to be frantically shooting towards a loved one’s room, missing your target. Very good personal defense rounds for handguns (i.e. Federal HST, Winchester Ranger and Speer Gold Dot) are designed to penetrate auto glass, for law enforcement agencies. These are also some of the best rounds for personal defense in handguns. They will retain almost all of their mass, especially when passing through dry wall.

Glock High Ready
Glock 17 High Ready
Colt LE6920 / Negotiating Corners.
Colt LE6920 / Negotiating Corners.

Any good modern firearm will most likely have a integrated rail on the frame. This allows you to attach various weapon lights on the handgun, giving you the ability to identify anyone in the home. You will be able to manipulate the light controls with one hand on the handgun as well. Target identification is paramount in these situations. You do not want to shoot a family member because you could not see them and thought they were the bad guy.

The handgun also allows you to store the firearm in a quick access safe, like a Gunvault safe. This insures others in the home, that you do not want getting a hold of the handgun, cannot access the firearm. A quick access safe can be stored, discreetly, anywhere in your home and gives you the ability to place several handguns in key areas of the home.

With all of these options you can see a reliable full size handgun is a very good choice. I feel it is the number one choice in most cases. I utilize several quick access safe throughout my home.

AR15:

A reliable AR15 is also a very good choice for a home defense firearm. Keeping in mind those two key topics, the 223/5.56mm round is one of the best rounds you can use for home defense. Terminal performance of the 223/5.56mm round is also going to stop a threat more effectively than a handgun round. It’s a fast moving small round and is more likely not to over penetrate or go through multiple barriers, (with the right round selection). M855 is not a home defense round.

The AR15 is a compact shoulder fired weapon and is going to be more accurate than a handgun. You will find that a handgun at full extension comes close to the extended muzzle of a 16″ AR15. With some training and practice you can move throughout a home very effectively. The AR15 is going to have a larger ammunition capacity than either the handgun or shotgun. You have the ability to use the support hand for brief periods of time, opening doors, moving something or dialing for emergency help. But, when it comes to firing rounds you will need both hands on the rifle. Also you will need to use the support hand to activate your light.

Colt LE6920, Aimpoint, Streamlight
Colt LE6920, Aimpoint, Streamlight TLR-1
Handgun at Extention
Handgun at Extention

With the AR15 you will be able to add accessories to mount, a weapon light and a red dot optic, (i.e. Aimpoint, Eotech or other). This will allow you to identify your target and get fast accurate shot placement.

Conclusion:

I took no pictures with a shotgun for this article because I currently do not have a shotgun. I sold my 870 and my Mossburg 590 long ago. I feel the shotgun does not have the advantages of a handgun or AR15 in the home, especially when you need to think about your family response plan. I currently use both an AR15 and handguns throughout my home, in the previously mentioned quick access safes. As my young ones grow older the rifle will slowly be fazed out and locked away.

Think long and hard about what role you, your wife or others my play in a home defense incident. Things are different when mom and dad are home, vs. only mom is home. Look at the layout of your home, are your kids upstairs or are they down the hall from you? Choosing the right firearm to move quickly to their rooms needs to be considered as well as possible scenarios, you may have to hold a child in one arm. Look at the support gear you will need, lights, optics and ammunition selection. Don’t buy something because the guy at the local guns store said it was the best or your buddy uses a particular firearm. Your needs and family makeup may be very different.

Either way, once you choose your dedicated home defense firearm(s), training and planning for your family will be key to an effective home defense. In the end, the only rounds that count are the rounds on target.

Duncan

My Aimpoint ML2, A Decade in Use.

I am a very strong proponent of Aimpoint sights. You really cannot go wrong choosing any of the Aimpoint models. When I was with my hometown police department, I was the only officer on the force with an Aimpoint, I carried an ML2 (purchased 2003).  This Aimpoint was with me when I was on the Firearms Unit and testing for SWAT. There was a lot of discussion about the Eotechs on the department in 2004 and 2005. The department decided on the Eotechs for issue optics and I just could not understand this. Every time I had to do an entry, there was always one guy with an Eotech, who had a dead battery. The guys on the team where changing batteries monthly or every several weeks. I never had an issue with my ML2, it just kept going strong year after year.

I am still running my original Aimpoint ML2 on my personal home defense Colt LE6920. In fact, I am on the original battery from 2003. The only thing I worry about is possible corrosion, as the battery has been in it for almost ten (10) years now. I have simply kept it in the ML2 and on the rifle this long, to see when it will finally die.

Aimpoint ML2 4 MOA
Aimpoint ML2 4 MOA
Colt LE6920 w/ Aimpoint ML2
Colt LE6920 w/ Aimpoint ML2

Now you may be thinking, It has never been left on and has not been through any hard use. I will tell you that it was in a rifle mount on patrol, in a Crown Vic, for almost four (4) years. I used it as my primary Instructor Rifle Optic and Patrol Rifle Optic, on  several Colt rifles, LE6933, RO933, LE6921 and an LE6920 for several years. The optic has seen more rounds on rifles than I even know. It has been though countless training classes, entry schools and instructor schools. When it was on duty, the ML2 was on for an average of ten (10) hours a day four (4) days a week.

For the past six (6) years the ML2 has been my home defense optic, on a Colt LE6920. I do not keep it on all the time but it does get used a lot. Mostly during range time now and Loose Rounds articles. It is still going strong and I’m sure the battery will die soon. I tried to do a rough calculation of how many hours it has been on. The only hard number I could go off, was the roughly ten (10) hour duty times. I estimated about 8060 hours. I know it has seen more hours than this but I just don’t have a way to measure this.

LE6920 / Aimpoint ML2
LE6920 / Aimpoint ML2

Conclusions:

The Aimpoint ML2 has a 10,000 hour battery life, (roughly one year). It has to be very close or over this mark. Given the fact it has stood up to every day patrol work, entry work, countless range days and tactical schools, on several different rifles, I would say Aimpoint is the only red dot optic I will ever use. If you purchase one of the newer Aimpoint models, (i.e. PRO, M3, ML3, M4, M4S, H1 or T1), with battery lives of 30,000 to 80,000 hours, these will likely last you a lifetime. There is no other optic that gives you this much bang for the buck.

Duncan.