Tag Archives: CCW

EXTRA Carry CCW Mag Pouch

A couple years ago, maybe longer I was sent this magazine holder thing for review.

 

The reason it has taken me so long is  I just couldn’t figure out the best way to use this thing.   As you can see the idea is to clip it into a pocket.

The problem is that the magazine is not indexed in a way that makes it easy to grab. Especially if you are in a hurry .  The section with the clip rakes at the hand.

It does go down into the pocket as it is meant to but it just isn’t fast to get out.   If you bought this to use as your only spare magazine carry pouch  I think that is a bad idea.  As and extra  one in addition to your belt mounted  pouch.. I think that would be OK.  Long as you realize it’s limitations.

The kydex  pouch has a clip that will rotate to let you put it on and off and its strong. It is a very positive and secure set up.   ON the other hand the pouch does not have any real retention.  The mag will fall out of you end upside down.

If you want to buy one and try it cause you think it might be for you, OK.  If you don’t, I doubt will regret i missing out  on it or anything.  I have no strong feelings on it one way or the other but I will say it doesn’t offer up anything for my personal uses.

A CALL TO ARMS

Today I am sharing  a rallying cry from  “Miama_JBT”     a member of ar15.com,  mod there and a FL police officer who  has worked hard and sacrificed much to  protect the  rights of  all gun owners.    As we watch state after state   make attempts to pass unconstitutional gun bans and restrictions  and the media make antigun darlings of  teens not even legally able to vote things are inching closer to what the left has wanted for decades.  It is time to do more than bitch online to each other , make jokes  or wait for the NRA  or even more  laughable, the GOP, to stand up for your civil right.  No more excuses unless you simply are willing to  make you into a monster then  make you into a felon with their “laws.”  

 

The 2nd Amendment is a very simple premise. It is 27 words.

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Seems simple enough, right? Well, the current events across the country on the local, state, and federal level say that such a simple statement is very hard to understand by a number of elected officials and unelected bureaucrats. But what does that have to do with gun owners losing?

Real simple. THEY DON’T FIGHT FOR THEIR RIGHTS. Gun Owners as a whole do not fight for the 2nd Amendment. Instead they want someone else to do it for them. Across the web and society all I see are gun owners making statements of anger at government, at the NRA, etc… yet I don’t see Gun Owners attending rallies at their Capitols. I don’t see them beating down the doors of their elected officials. I don’t see them attending Republican Party meetings and Raising Cain about the sudden turncoat actions by the GOP. I don’t see any of that.

Instead, what I see are people that want someone else to do the heavy lifting for them. They want someone else to do the fighting. I’ve spent a good portion of this decade burning my vacation time to fight for the 2nd Amendment in Florida. What do I see at the Capitol? Marion Hammer of the NRA, Eric Friday of Florida Carry, and maybe if I’m lucky, someone from one of the Libertarian groups in Florida. That’s it.

I don’t see anyone meeting with their elected Representatives or Senators. I don’t see them scheduling face to face meetings with the Speaker of the House, the Senate President, the Majority Whip, or the Governor. I don’t see Gun Owners speaking at Committee Meetings when Pro and Anti gun bills are in discussion.

What do I see? I see 7,000 fellow gun owners going to the Tampa Gun Show on Saturday alone to buy more stuff to horde instead of going to the Capitol or their elected officials offices. I see people complain that the NRA isn’t doing anything. I see gun owners claim that the GOP betrayed them. But when I ask these people what do they do, let alone if they know their elected officials. I get blank stares and gaping mouths in return.

Paying a yearly membership to the NRA doesn’t do much. It just gives them a member due. The NRA is only 5 million in the USA as a whole and only 300,000 in Florida. There are 1.8 million active CCW permits in Florida. That means there are six times more people that carry guns in Florida that are NRA members. But even then, the NRA is just one organization. They have their own goals and their own mission. But people believe that the NRA is a like their parents and will keep all the bad meanies away from their guns.

Far from the truth. The NRA backs Gun Violence Restraining Orders that violated the 4th Amendment. Marion Hammer, Chris Cox, Wayne LaPierre, and now another NRA lobbyist by the name of Rick Armitage have all stated at one point or another since October 2017 that they support the ban on bump stocks and similar devices.

Yet people either blindly support them or outright hate them. But I can tell you they don’t take any action to correct the issues within the NRA. Issues that can be solved by voting in strong Pro 2nd Amendment Gun Owners to the Board of Directors.

Folks like Tim Knight and Adam Kraut.

Gun Owners do the same with their elected officials. They don’t question their elected officials. They blindly pull the lever and vote for any candidate that has an (R) by their name on the belief that such a person if Pro Gun. And that if we’re lucky. A good portion of gun owners don’t even vote. You know it, I know it, and the politicians know it.

Just as a quick recap for history. The following Republicans Governors have passed gun control.

    • Ronald Reagan banned open carry and made a waiting period mandatory in California.
    • Mitt Romney signed the assault weapon ban into law in Massachusetts.
    • George Pataki signed the assault weapon ban into law in New York.
    • George Deukmejian signed the first of many assault weapon bans into law in California.
    • Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the ban on .50 BMG caliber firearms in California.
    • Rick Scott signed the ban on Bump Stocks, pushed Gun Violence Restraining Orders, and prohibits anyone under 21 from buying a firearm in Florida.

But gun owners don’t raise the issue until it is too late. Even with President Trump. They elected him into office with the belief that they don’t have to fight for their rights now. Someone else will do it for them!

The common excuse I hear from gun owners is “it’s too far away“, “I can’t afford it“, “that’s why I’m a member of XYZ group“, “why vote, my voice is outnumbered“, “it’s too hard, we don’t have the numbers“, “I don’t want to be on a list/registry“, etc…

The majority of Gun Owners are much like Homer Simpson.

I write this to raise awareness and stir the masses. We only have ourselves to look at for these failures and assaults and on the 2nd Amendment. I personally burn my vacation and sick time from work to fight for the 2nd Amendment. I put myself out there and at the same time put my own marriage on the side to fight.


Me speaking in support of Stand Your Ground.


Me speaking in support of ending gun free zones.


Me speaking against the passage of SB 7026 in the Florida Senate.


Me speaking to fellow gun owners willing to rally at the Florida Capitol.

I put my career on the line when I speak up for gun owners at the Capitol. I put myself on lists when I enter public comments on websites like the Federal Registrar’s public comments for BATFE’s revisal of Bump Stocks or when I email or write to any elected official in Florida due to our public disclosure laws.

I’m not afraid. Our Founding Fathers put their wealth, property, lives, and most importantly their honor on the line to fight for our independence from oppressive government. Many lost their wealth and some lost their lives. But they saw the sacred duty that they swore to and fought for liberty.

I ask that you, my fellow gun owner, stop being the sunshine patriot and instead bear the true duty that is needed. Stand up and fight for your rights and those of your fellow man. Do not make boisterous statements of “from my cold dead hands” without actually fighting.

Stand up and take notice! Stop relying on others and do the task that is needed. Go to your elected officials. Meet with them, make your voice heard. I’m just one man, but if I knew I had an army of fellow gun owners independently doing the same as I.

WE WOULD BE AN ARMY

Reach down and find the pair that our Founding Fathers had. MAKE YOUR VOICES HEARD!

 

Colt Lightweight Commander Review Part 2 The Accuracy Test

 

I know it seems like it’s been forever ago since I  did the first part of this review , but a lot has happened.  Sorry about the delay for those of you waiting on this.

In the time between these sections I have had a lot of time with this gun. It has taken over duties as my every day CCW piece, replacing the XSE Gov model I carried for the last 11 years.  That is how much I have grown to love it and trust it.   Believe me, replacing the Colt XSE was not an easy thing to do. Besides the quality and accuracy of that gun, there was a lot of memories and sentimental value that went with it.    Maybe that  was the final reasons I did put it in semi retirement as a constant carry  gun.

While shooting it these months I really appreciate the new dual recoil spring system colt has started using in all of their pistols.  No, it’s not some complicated thing if that’s what you are thinking, just a spring in a spring that can be easily taken out for cleaning just like normal. Its the same setup in the M45A1 and Delta Elites.   It does really well softening recoil on hotter rounds like the 10mm, and on the light weight frame commander it helps a lot with hot rounds I like to use for carry like the Corbon +P  solid copper hollow points.

I fired all my stand by accuracy loads in the commander to test it for groups and one ball round loading just to see,

Groups were fired from a bench with bags, slow fire as is my usual method.    I fired five rounds groups other than the 10 round group in upper right using ball. Only did this cause I had a wilson 10 round mag loaded with ball in my pocket when i went to do this. The ranger T load is upper left

These three groups are my carry load in upper left, my back up carry load upper right, which is the winchester DPX .  Bottom group is the excellently accurate hornady 185 match semi wadcutters.  A load me and a friend have been using for years for the most accurate handload we can come up with.

 

As requested recently, I have started shooting extended ranges ( for handguns) as part of my standard test and review.   This request was made by a reader curious to see what modern handguns could do if needed to shoot beyond distances most think of as normal handgun  ranges in the event of active shooter or terrorist attack. The idea being you HAVE TO made a longer shot for some reason, Maybe because the nut bag is wearing a vest that may explode and kill you if you are too close or the bad guy has a rifle and has ballistic advantage over you.   Either way, the testing has led to some pretty surprising results.   I may be paranoid and crazy but this has made me think it would be wise to start integrating longer shots into regular training  to prepare for that potential since modern handguns and ammo are up to the task with a shooter who can milk it.

First I need to say I did shoot at a man shaped paper target at 75 and 100 yards and  thought I took pictures of it.  Apparently I didn’t because I am an idiot.   Even more so because I burned the paper targets to clean up the area at the strip job we shoot longer ranges at.   So , trying not to litter means I can’t even go back and get the target.

I did take pictures of the 200 yard target.  Luckily.    The groups at 100 were so encouraging it made me try 200.  Bare in mind, it took me  20 or more rounds to get the right hold on the target, I didn’t just walk back 200 and fire for record.  It took some  careful hold and fire and see,kinda thing.   It is doable though and once I had the hold over figured out, it was repeatable. I used a steel gong to get the range down and after the record target we all took turns hitting the gong at 200.   This was a real revelation to a couple of the guy who thought a 45 ACP round  from a pistol wouldn’t even travel that far.

I used a 200 yard NRS bullseye rifle target.  Twenty rounds were fired and I got 8 rounds in the black. I only managed 14 hits total on the paper in the black and white.   Still pretty good I think if I do have to say so myself.

Obviously all shots were from a bench and bags not off hand.  But with enough practice I’m sure a man sized target could be hit with a pistol off hand or from some kind of support like using a car hood or truck bed.

Selection of round used would make it harder or easier as well.  A hotter and lighter  165 or 185 would shoot flatter than a 230 grain bullet fired from a walmart plinking loading.

Making these longer range testings part of the review process has really got me thinking though.  I  have in mind to try some 9mm handguns with some of the hotter self defense loads to see what can be done I think the lighter faster round may show some impressive results  and a future article will definitely be a test of various handguns and rounds at 100 yards and beyond to see the absolute limit to what you may be able to hit if you really need to.

To wrap up,  Colt LWT Commander is super  nice and as I said is now my standard carry gun.  It’s weight and handling make it a real joy and it’s got all the accuracy I need.  It has had 1876 rounds through it this summer of all kinds  of ammo with no problems.   It has lived up to be everything I asked out of it and more.

 

 

 

Oil , Lube, Grease, Cleaning. What do I Use?

I get asked all the time what lube I use on my AR15s and other guns.  I doubt I’m the only one that gets this question. It’s a topic all over the gun forums with people arguing the virtue of their favorites.  I don’t usually don’t feel a need jump in this discussion except when the topic turns to bore solvent.  I see a lot of people declare hoppes9 the end all be all of bore solvents.   Folks. That just ain’t true.  I suppose if you just like to swab the bore a little it will work ok for your needs, nut for a real deep true cleaning,  you have to use something else.   But first let me talk about the lubes I use.

There it is.  I could probably end this post right now and say nothing else and I would have said enough.  Truth is though, the slip2000 product line is great.  It’s not snake oil. its nor cooking oil or whatever. It’s just good stuff.  it doesn’t stink, it won’t poison you and it stays put and works.    The  bore cleaning  carbon cleaner solvent with the green color even works well.   I like to soak parts in it  then tooth brush them clean.

The EWG is a grease as you can see and It is just a thickened version of the lube . It stays in place no matter what.  If I’m going out in conditions where I know it’s going to likely really rain or be wet for several days, I slather it on.

I also like to dab some on the inside of a M1911 or other lesser pistol if its a really hot day and we are going to be doing some major round count shooting.  The gun can get  too hot to hold and it can be 100 outside but this will still be on the gun at the end.

The other lubes are my day to day workhorse lubes.  It seems to not be well known, but slip2000 oil is actually a CLP, that combo much beloved by many who are always looking for a magic bullet answer. The truth is, it works really good in that role.  Like all CLPs it doesnt do all three things  perfectly, but it will lube and protect excellently. And like regular CLP, it will make cleaning much, much easier when you are using it as your main lubricant.

The SLip200EWL 30 is a thicker version of the regular EWL. It stays put and doesn’t spread out and run off like a thinner lube.  I like to use it in tight spots and hard to get to areas.  I especially like it on my CCW pistol in summer when it gets really hot and I don’t want my clothes ruined. It’s also a great choice for storing your guns away for a few months.  It’s not what you would want for years long storage in a back room or underground tin foil bunker, but if you are needing rust prevention for a few months, this is good stuff and it can be left on and used  on a weapon without needing wiped off like something much thicker used just for long term storage.

Now here are some lubes I consider my 2nd choice.  These are  not bad because they are not my first choice. They just do not  have the same level of performance in areas I feel are important to my needs.  The CLP is a classic, you know what it does.    It is toxic though, they tell me anyway, and it is a pretty crappy cleaner in all honesty. Not that I would ever use it for that as long as I have a better choice.   But it’s a reliable lube that works even if you need to apply it often.

The other is the classic  military lube, LSA.  Not a cleaner and a so so long term rust preventive.   You can not mix it with other lubes you may have on the gun. so you have to commit to it like a marriage if you are going to use it on a gun.  It was developed for the M16 and other automatic weapons I have read in some TMs.  It does work really well as a lube only.   I have heard it is still in use in military stocks and some really love it.  It is getting harder to find though it seems.  But if you have a huge back stock of it like me bought over the years its a good 3rd choice.    Its mainly the lube I hand out for friends  or strangers who come to shoot and aren’t smart enough to have their own lubricant.

Every other lube not mentioned above is all fine and well.  I would use any and all of them if you handed it to me when I needed oil but just not what I would pick if I had choice  of my favs.   Some are snake oil however, and some just are marginally decent but I suppose better than nothing.

Here is something I first read about in Precision Shooting Magazine years ago and though it was a gimmick.

Hey, its legit.   BreakFree makes a copy of it you can get at walmart but it’s really not the same.  I have tried it and it takes a lot of the breakfree foaming bore cleaner to start to get some where, and to really truly clean you still need a brush and some elbow grease.   Thi stuff is the real deal though and I think what the breakfree brand tried to copy.   Its pricey but if you are like me and get really lazy sometimes or you are away from home and need to some what clean a bore over night in a hotel room or just need or want to clean during a break in shooting , this is really good.

Now the real cleaners for serious bore cleaning for precision rifles and match rifles there are only 3 I take serious.  I have used all three over many years and have absolute faith in them for real bore cleaning.

  1. Butches Bore Shine
  2. TM Solutions
  3. Shooter Choice

Now the first two are almost interchangeable in quality. Third is still great though  not quite as good as the other two.   TM has the real benefit of having almost no smell

Hoppes9 is not on the list..

Some older military bore solvents can be effective but hard to find and very toxic though.

Now the products that are more specialized but sometimes can be needed.

Sweets 762 solvent.  For heavy copper fouling.  It is safer than some say.  I soaked a blued barrel and SS barrel section in sweets for 6 months one time in the late 90s at my old job site .   No damage was done to the barrel steel sections.  Though I wouldn’t use it on a chrome bore AR.

JB Bore paste.   A very abrasive paste that is very messy and a lot of work but it can clean an old rifle bore that hasn’t seen a rod and patch in 50 years or was owned by an idiot.  Don’t go crazy with it because it is abrasive.

Brake Cleaner.  What is better than spraying crud off and out of semi autos  or anything?  Make sure to get the non chlorinated.

There is some other car solvents that I sue but, I am still testing and making sure they are not too damaging to guns and stocks etc before I recomend them publicly to people.

 

That is about it.    That is what I use and recommend. You may and can use whatever else you want but this is just what I use and it has not failed me.

KAHR ARMS P45 Part 2 Accuracy Test

The last time we took a look at the Kahr P45  in the first part to my review. I covered it’s various attributes and features.   http://looserounds.com/2017/05/21/kahr-arms-p45-part-1/

Now we will take a look at how the gun does in accuracy testing.  I did the testing in my usual manner. I shot 5 shot groups of various ammo I could get my  hands on at 20 and  25 yards from a a bench with sand bags.  Ammo was of the the type to be used for duty or self defense and some ball and target ammo handloads included.   All groups are shot slow fire  to the best of my ability to  try to give the gun every chance to show us what it has.

Per request I also started the practice of shooting handguns meant for defensive use at longer ranges. The idea being the possible need to stop a terrorist who may have explosives strapped to himself.

First off we have the Hornady 185 gr  SWC handloads.  A personal favorite accuracy load of mine that I won’t be sharing the load data for.  The load is a go to for accuracy testing and the gun loved it as much as most others.  The markings are the sharpie drawn square I drew for the target.    All groups are at 20 yards unless  marked.

The next load is my personal carry ammo.  The barnes 185 gr solid copper HPs in a +P load.   My 1911s shoot well with it and the extra weight of the gov model tames it.    The Kahr with its plymer frame and light weight made for painful shooting.  The gun also didn’t seems to like it as much as the M1911s.

The next group is a well know favorite of many.  Many of the local LE officers use it as their duty ammo.  I have never been in love with it to the same degree as others but  that’s just a personal choice.  This was group  is about what all other groups fired with the GD looked like.  I could not get it to shoot any tighter.

Next I tried some 230 grain lead practice and plinking ammo. It is common to use this as a plinking and practice load.  The gun didn’t like it to put it mildly.

Next up is another popular load.  The Winchester ranger T load,  a 230 gr HP that is basically the much hyped “black talon” without the evil black.  It was and is a common and popular police and carry loading that many still like to use.  It was so so.

 

The Federal HST is another common and some what popular self defense rounds at least locally..  I have never used it much beyond shooting it as a test load in pistol reviews, If you carry it and are thinking of a P45, here is how it did in the T&E sample.

The next two are both FMJ 230 gr ball rounds.  Not much to say about factory ball that you don’t already know,

This group is fired from my other self defense carry load.  This is the Corbon  185gr +P solid copper HP.  It is the same bullet as the barnes load without the grey/black coating.  This load shoots great in my 1911s and does well in this gun.   To no surprise  at all, it was rough shooting the hotter loads through the P45. The grip texture and the polymer frame are not comfortable to a guy like me used to the weight of the M1911. But it is an excellent SD load.

This is the Corbon  load in the 165 gr solid copper round.  It is again the same Barnes solid copper HP bullet in 165 grains  but not a +P loading.  This round is tailored for the shorter sub compact handguns with shorter barrels.  I use it as the standard carry  ammo in the Colt Defender.   It also works fine and is much more pleasant in the P45.  If i was going to carry the P45 this is the SD load I would use in it.

Above is a 10 round 25 yard group  fired with the target load of 185 SWCs.    The  loads are excellent in the P45.  Maybe it just likes 185 bullets period? It seems so on the surface anyway.

The same load fired a 50 yards as promised.  I fired two mags at the orange square not quite off hand but nor from bags and a rest.   It was more or less semi-supported as I rested my hands on something while standing up.   I would have shot 50 from bags and the bench but  didn’t realize that was the last of it I had until after I had shot this target.   Anyway, if you had to take an emergency  long range pistol shot I would think you would have to do it without sandbags and a bench anyways.    Maybe you could get into prone  to  steady yourself if you had time but who could really say?   It’s always worth seeing how a handgun or rifle would do offhand anyway.

 

The gun had no problems for me. I fired  896 rounds with no problems using a variety of bullet styles and  pressures.   I purposefully never lubed the gun and never had a problem.  The trigger is not what I would call great as I am of course a 1911 guy but I think it is fine for the striker style.  It took me considerable dry fire practice for 5 nights in a roll to get used to it.  No fault of the gun this is just a fact of life for a guy born with a M1911 in his hand.  All of the controls are easy to hit and I can’t fault it with anything.   It would make a good CCW pieve for the new owner looking for a solid reliable pistol without spending a lot.

 

 

 

Colt’s New Lightweight Commander Part 1

The   of Colt light weight Commander  has been  around for a long time.    It was the first major variant of the M1911 that colt brought out to the market and while a lot of the big names associated with handgun use and training and gun writers  at the time considered  close to perfect for carry, it did not take off in popularity at the time.

The original Commander with the ally frame  lead to  the Combat Commander with the steel frame.  The all steel frame commander is  a fine gun. It handles superbly and  some people, lie my brother, find they can shoot the combat commander better than a full size 1911.   I have owned both and love both but I have come to prefer the original commander over the CC. The reason for that is that if I am going to be carrying a smaller gun, I may as well have a smaller and lighter gun.  For all of my adult life I always preferred the full size M1911 for carry and I still do. But with the  Commander ( I will refer to the alloy frame as what it originally was , the commander and the steel frame later model as the CC , for Combat Commander )I get a M1911 a little shorter and considerable weight savings.  While the Colt Defender is a sub compact, it  doesn’t give the sight radius or full grip of the commander.  The subcompacts also require careful accounting of how often you replace springs.  Of course that isnt’t a deal breaker or a negative, it’s just the trade off for having such a compact gun.  Just like rotating tires and changing oil.

With all that in mind, when Colt brought a Commander back out in specs that are much like my beloved XSE models, I bought one as quickly as I could.

Like all Colt handguns it came with two Colt factory mags in the same finish as the gun.  They are of course full sized mags because the commander has a full sized grip.  Both mags are the 8 round type sure to give an upset tummy to the 7 round mag purists I have no doubt.

 

A very nice touch on this new model is the grips.  This is a big upgrade Colt has been adding to its current pistol line up because they are the  very tough VZ grips.  As you can see the grips are made with the Colt logo made into the checkering and it is very attractive to my eyes.  I like checkered wood grips on CCW guns and these look and feel the same as wood checkering and are a lot tougher.  Unlike wood checkering these won’t wear down and smooth out like wood, keeping the gripping texture the same.

The commander comes with the an  extended combat safety.  I am not 100 percent but I am pretty sure it is a wilson combat model.  I still prefer the STI safeties that came on the XSE series, but I have no complaints with this one and I doubt I will ever change it out.  The temptation to go ambi is strong though. I have a hard time understanding why anyone for not want a safety they could deactivate with either hand when it comes to a gun they think some day they may have to fight with.   That said, it is not a must and I will leave this one as is.

You can see the current commander comes with the hammer type that was introduced when the original commanders came to market.  A lot of people really like the look of this “rowel ” style hammer and will add one to their guns.  For a long time I was indifferent about this but in recent years it has grown on me.  It is however slightly heavier than the rounded hammer that is more common, so it does have an advantage beyond classic good looks.

You can also of course see the now standard S&A grip safety.  I am pleased to say this is something colt has started doing since 09 and it was long awaited by me.  There are a lot of grip safeties out there but this one is the one I always opt for when I have a choice.

The commander also comes with the standard sights for Colt’s combat and carry pistols.  Those of course are the Novaks. I know there is a move towards rear sights that can be used for cycling the gun by hand if wounded in one arm but I find that there are plenty of other edges on a 1911 that  can be used for this.  The front sights, the edges on the ejection port are a couple of examples.   I love the look and lines of the novak sights. I also like the non snag lower profile.  It’s been around forever and more than 2 million have been sold.  There is a reason for that.

Another very welcome touch is the front strap.  Like the Colt Gold Cup target pistols, the commander has the front strap cut for gripping grooves. With the VZ grips, and the matching MSH, this makes for  a very solid and sure grip.

And of course the scalloping cut where the trigger guard meets the front strap is there.  This little bit of detail makes a big difference for me.  The way I grip the guns benefits a lot from that little bit of metal being removed.  I know it makes no difference for some people’s grip, but it does for me and its a very nice touch that used to be a custom gun only detail.

Like every pistol Colt has made for carry use since 2009, the commander has the edges dulled for carry and comfort.   The front sight can be seen and its the Novak front.

The commander also uses the standard, original recoil spring guide and plug.  No full length guide rod. I can remember a time when the standard  JMB system was good enough, then it wasn’t and we all had to have guide rods, and now we are back to the USGI original parts being the preferred and wise choice.  I agree for what it’s worth but it’s funny how things go back and forth.   Of course the commander uses its own parts for this as its shorter than the government model.

On the topic of recoil springs, the commander uses the now standard dual recoil spring system.   The original 10mm delta elite came with a dual recoil spring system and it was brought back when that gun was resurrected.   The next gun to get that treatment was the  M45A1 made for MARSOC.  This  dampened recoil and wear and tear on parts so much it was made standard on a lot of the new models.   It does help,  I noticed the recoil of the new delta to be tamed greatly and it makes a big difference with this light alloy framed commander.    I have no doubt it will eventually be the recoil spring set up in every colt gun in the near future.  It adds not complication in taking the gun apart nor does it hurt function.  It does soften recoil.   I am considering changing over to  dual springs on my guns that are already comfortable to shoot like my full size government models in 45 ACP.

The crowning on the barrel of this gun is interesting.  The picture doesn’t show it well  but It has a very nice crowning job.  I don’t mean it’s just a competent job done on an assembly line, I mean it looks to me like it was given special care.  I have carefully compared it to my other Colt’s of this years vintage and it has a crowing job you would expect from a gunsmith.  I have not confirmed this is a new standard Colt has started to phase in, but I hope so, I will update this post when I learn the answer to this.

The barrel is the stainless steel Colt barrel seen on all modern guns save for the models that come with the Colt national match barrel. Of course it is shorter than the full size gov model.   The standard slide release is seen on the right side as well as the three hole competition trigger.  Unlike the XSE models or Gold cup this 3 hole trigger is  not adjustable for over travel.  This isn’t a problem because the truth is, the new triggers from Colt are excellent.  They are crisp and break clean.   That is not to imply they are 2 pounds or lighter, but they are  greatly improved from the triggers from pre 09.   I have purchased five Colt M1911s since 2014 and the triggers on these guns are all I could ask.   I have never bought into the complaints about the series 80 triggers anyway, but the factory has really upped their game on putting out fine fire control parts on their pistols.  I can only  imagine how good the new series 70 competition series 1911s  are.

The roll mark on the slide is the now standard style that is a throwback to the commercial vintage models.  It has always been my favorite version.   I’m glad to see they are sticking with this marking system for  the time being,   The right side roll marks are of course the lines that denote  the specifics of the model as always.  In this case the light weight commander.

Right side also shows  larger flared ejection port.  Another now standard feature on all models not meant to be retro.  The new style cocking serrations can be seen.  These first showed up on the MARSOC M45A1  USMC gun and it looks like they are here to stay on every gun that is made to modern styling.  A few models have the legacy serration pattern or something else but every gun that is meant for tactical/CCW use now has this pattern.   If I could change only one thing..       Not to say I hate it or have to avert my eyes, but I simply like the older style  or the serration found on the older XSE models not extinct but for the Combat Elite.    Some will rejoice that there is not forward slide serrations.   Looks-wise,  I don’t really care.  Do some models look better without them ? Yes.  Do some look fine with them ? Yes.    If I am going to have them I would rather have the older style if I had a say in the matter.  But having them, not having them or style  would not make me buy or not buy.    For the record I do think front cocking serrations are a nice thing to have on a gun that may be used for the most serious of environments and having options in emergencies are always good.   I like them on my XSEs, I like not having them on some other models.   I just like 1911s .

Just for comparison,  pictured below is classic serrations and XSE style.  I use XSE  as a expedient term not only for angle of the serrations but spacing of each cut  as well as  forward serrations. This angle of the serrations of course existed before the XSE line, but  the amount of serrated cuts and size  varied.

This is the more classic retro original style.

And below are the XSE type seen on a Combat Elite.  All styles are fine with me.   But, as I said before if it was up to me, I would have stuck with the XSE style.   I’m sure the change over came because it was easier to make some using the new system that was came about for the specs of the M45A1.   It would have been a waste to have a set up just for one model pistol that came about because of the wants of the most flaky and fickle of customers, the US Gov.

 

 

 

Not pictured because I forgot, is the standard Colt slightly beveled magazine well.   A little better than no bevel but not really enough to reach the same benefits of an extended beveled well.   I have not felt any real pressing need for an extended beveled well added since I stop competition.    For carry or fighting guns I like being able to quickly load mags that don’t have a bumper pad,   My thinking is, you never know what mag you may have to use in an emergency and I want it to lock in immediately without worrying because it doesn’t have a pad and I didn’t eve think about it because I am used to my personal mags having the extended bumper.   Without the extended well It’s not an issue for me .

As usual, part 2 will be accuracy testing.  I have been carrying this gun for about 3 months in a variety of holsters and carrying options.  The gun already has 1500 rounds through it with no problems.  Accuracy has already show to be excellent with my carry ammo so I expect it to do well with other types and brands.    Formal accuracy testing beyond what I carry has not started as of this writing but it will be coming with a few weeks,    Please come back by for Part 2.

 

 

 

KAHR ARMS P45 Part 1

With Trump winning the election. A few things have come to pass.   Gun buyers ( wrongly)  have assumed the danger  of a possible “assault rifle” ban has ended for a while, the rush to buy those guns has subsided ,  there has been a sharp alarming rise in radical left violence  and CCW promotion has been on the march.   With growing carriers  and more states “allowing”  permit less carry, those new to CCW need guns to carry.  Most of the new gun owners  wanting a handgun have  more interest in  smaller more compact and lighter pistols for carry.  In fact a lot of veteran Concealed carriers want those things in a carry gun if the last few years  have taught us anything.  I suppose not everyone is like me and insists on always having a full size government model on the at all times.  Who knew?

 

With that in mind, when Kahr arms graciously  offered me my choice in pistols to review, my first selection was the P45.  Assuming I don’t explode the p istol in my own face, you will be seeing us reviewing more firearms from Kahr.

https://www.kahr.com/Pistols/Kahr-P45-w-Night-Sights.asp

Caliber: .45 ACP
Capacity: 6+1
Operation: Trigger cocking DAO; lock breech; “Browning – type” recoil lug; passive striker block; no magazine disconnect
Barrel: 3.54″, polygonal rifling, 1 – 16.38 right-hand twist
Length O/A: 6.07″
Height: 4.8″
Slide Width: 1.01″
Weight: Pistol 18.5 oz., Magazine 2 oz.
Grips: Textured polymer
Sights: Drift adjustable, tritium night sights
Finish: Black polymer frame, matte stainless steel slide
Magazines: 3 – 6 rd, Stainless

 

With the specs listed above, lets take a look at the gun with my observations.

The gun is indeed flat and compact.  It has the now standard polymer frame common on modern pistols.   The rear  of the grip has a textured checkering that bites into the hand when as soon as  you grip it. It is  not sharp or painful but it is effective.  I found it to work a lot better than the type I have encountered on the various glocks I have shot.

The front has the same type of  checkering as the rear and  once you grip the gun, it is staying put.

 

P45

The front strap also has a undercut where the trigger guard meets the front strap.  This allows a higher grip and is something I have on all of  my serious use M1911s.  The trigger guard also has a contour in it that helps lock the alternate shooting  hand into place once you wrap it around your firing hand.  At first glance I didn’t know what purpose of this was but it became pretty clear quickly.  I don’t know that it will perfectly match up to everyone’s  hand shape and size but it did mine.

The magazine release button is where you expect and works perfectly.  It has some checkering on it but not as aggressive as the grip.  With the size of this gun it should be no problem for even small hands to hit  it without having to change the firing grip.  Same goes for the slide release.  The release is made with some slotting to make it easier to operate but being a 1911 I prefer something with more of a ledge on it personally.  If you are a “slingshot ” kinda Guy or Gal or something in between, I doubt it will matter.  Administrative operation of the slide stop is still easy and positive.

As I tried to show in the picture above, the machine work on the slide is pretty impressive.  If a lack of any tooling marks matters to you then this pistol will make you feel happy your hard earned dollar was spent on something  with quality looking craftsmanship.  It doesn’t do a very good in the picture above but I will try to get better close up pictures in later parts of the review and test. ,

The sights are nigh sights as listed in the specs and they work well.  Front and rear are the same color green though if that is something that concerns you.   They sights are dove tailed in place though so changing should not be a problem if that is your wont.  The rear is also made to facilitate operating the side with one hand if the need arises.

The pistol came with three stainless steel mags.  The extended magazine being the 7 round mag. I’m glad to see the gun come with three magazines because it is my policy to carry a handgun with at least 2 spare mags.  I think this is just smart policy no matter how many rounds the guns magazine will hold.   All three have worked perfectly in dry runs and dry fire.   

Now as for size.  I have take a picture of the P45 besides my various CCW guns most people are familiar with. I hope this will give an idea of its  compactness.   First off above is the P45 beside a Colt Defender. The defender is the subcompact from Colt with the 3 inch barrel  and holds a standard of 7 rounds of .45 auto.

Below is the P45 beside a Colt lightweight Commander.  The commander uses the same frame as a full size government model but with a slightly shorter slide. I should mention now that  yes the Commander will have a review up soon .

The P45’s trigger is like most triggers of its type. Not as good as a M1911 trigger of course  but a lot better than a DA/SA. It is workable and I am hoping with use it will improve even more so.

As is my custom this is the first part in a 2 to possible 3 part review.  Accuracy testing will be in part 2 and part 3 will be reliability endurance testing if  it is not included with the accuracy review.  I will shoot a variety of hollow point and self defense ammo through the pistol and it takes time to gather up.  That is the reason for a delay and the reviews being done in parts  for those that have asked in the past.    Please keep and eye out soon for part 2.

A look Back: Long Term T&E OF CCW Gear

When I get stuff I really think highly of, I like to take a another look at it as time passes.  To see how well it has held up or if my opinion has changed.   Since we started the website, we have gotten a lot of holsters to try out.  Holsters aren’t something really sexy to readers but they are a necessary accessory if you take carrying your gun seriously.

Today we are gonna revisit a few things from 5 years ago and one item now at its 10th year of near daily use by me.

Fist thing I want to update on is the comp-tac gun belt.  I love this thing.  They sent me on in 2013 and after a few months I wrote about it. I have used this belt every day of my life since.  I do not put on pants without this thing, even when doing work that would get me and the belt filthy.  It has only gotten softer and more comfortable with age and use. The kydex strip in the center has kept it stiff and supports a handgun and two mags all day.

The only slight marring it has is from me dragging the buckle across it when I try to yank it tighter with one hand.  Even that hasn’t hurt the leather or worn any thing places.  The belt is made for serious use for years.   I’m 40 now and I could see this belt lasting the rest of my life baring I catch on fire or get smashed in a car wreck or the belt takes a bullet.   You can see in the pictures how well made it is.  Not one stitch has come loose.   You can’t ask for more  in my opinion.

The holster sent with the belt has also stood my test of time and use. I use this one for when I want a deeper cover IWB.  By adjusting the outside belt clips you can have it set higher or lower.  I keep mine at the lowest so the grip of my M1911 just barely comes out above my pants, The holster is very comfortable. The leather backing is wide and spreads out around your hip and leg are. It keeps it from feeling like a lump. The kydex keeps it stiff and open for smooth draw and makes it easier to re holster.  I use it very heavy in summer months when wearing just a T-shirt.  It is a great holster.  For normal CCW, I use two holster mainly and this is one of them.  This holster surprised me. I got it to review and had no idea it would end up being a mainstay of my CCW life.

This last holster is my longest serving CCW holster.  I got this holster 10 years ago this month. It is a custom made Kirkpatrick Leather IWB holster.  I had seen this bit of leather in some place or the other and knew I wanted to try it.  It was exactly what I had in mind in a quick to put on and take off IWB holster that gave me a full master grip from the draw and had a skin guard.   it’s obviously a lot like the Milt Sparks summer special, but it seems a little smaller to me.

This holster with gun shown inside have been through a lot of stuff on my side. Soaked in sweat and rain, submerged in water and generally beat around.  It has been with me as I traveled from PA to SC and to all states in between that it’s legal to carry in.  I can not even imagine how many miles the gun and holster have traveled with me as my old job  required an insane amount of travel.  It has been on my side through the best times of my life and its the holster I used the most hands down. At this point it  has as much sentimental value for me as it has practical utility.

Now with its age and miles, it is starting to show.  The leather is rubbed and worn pretty well in some places, but no holes. The belt loops are very supple now as if most of the holster.  The stiffener for the top has started to get a little softer unfortunately, but it still has a long way to go.

The only issue starting after 10 years is some of the stitches have come out.

I’m not sure what has caused this other than wear, tear and time.  No doubt me sweating all over it day after day helped weaken the stitches as well as the sometimes wetting it has taken and the oil from the gun soaking through to it.  Regardless its a small matter to me.  The local leather shop tells me its will take seconds to put a few new stitches in it to shore it up. I believe the flap is glued in addition to sewed so I have no fear it will come loose.  The kirckpatrick leather holster have my highest recommendation.  Not being a fad holster company these days, you can get one pretty quickly and its all hand made in the USA with high quality leather,  You can even chose the leather loops like mine or the kydex clip.   Either way I doubt you could go wrong.

It’s good to take a look back at the things we use and write about, Nothing compares to use and time as the best T&E.

 

 

Ten-Speed Pouches

Ten-Speed Pouch

I took advantage of the Blue Force Gear Labor Day sale to pick up a couple more Ten-Speed pouches.  I found the new production pouches (one on the right) noticeably looser than the old ones(left).  This is a good thing, as the old ones I have are still very tight and can be hard to remove mags from.  The black pouch on the right will be mounted to a Pocket Shield for carrying a CCW spare mag.  Tom Kelly of Dark Star Gear told me about this setup and I have been using it for over a year now with the pouch on the left.

I don’t think I would recommend the Ten-Speed pouches as heavy use gear on chest rigs and plate carriers due to the tightness of the pouches and how they can be cut or have holes worn through them.  That said, due to their super low profile you can easily place them under other items.

For example, I have a Ten-Speed triple mag shingle on my plate carrier.  So I can carry 3 mags with out anything else on the carrier.  If I don’t have any mags on that, it almost like it isn’t there, and I can use a chest rig over the plate carrier.

New 2016 Colt Delta Elite 10mm Part 2 : Accuracy Test

Last time we took a look at the new Delta Elite 10mm pistol from Colt, we saw the refinements on the new Delta, compared to the classic Delta Elite from the 1980s. In my opinion , it is a very fine pistol.  It has all of the “custom production” enhancements I want in a modern M1911, that I intend to carry and use as opposed to set in a safe.

With the new Delta being  obviously configured for carry and hunting in mind, I used a variety of ammo choices in this go around.   I chose some modern carry /defense loads along with ball practice/training ammo.  There are still some brands and types of 10mm ammo out there I have not gotten my hands on yet and when I do I will add to this review or update.    One thing I kept in mind this time, is the cost of the  10mm ammo and how likely the average buyer could find them in the local gun store.   My thinking is to mix in ammo the new buyer, who is not a dedicated 10mm lover, would likely see in the same store the gun was being sold.   I did mix in carry and high performance ammo that would also be encountered in a store, compared to some of the more expensive high end ammo from places like Double Tap.  Lastly, I did not ignore the reality that money is tight for most people these days and most 10mm shooting is likely to be done with ball training ammo.  As I said above, a future post with high performance 10mm ammo will be upcoming.

The groups shown are an average of all rounds fired from each ammo type.  I fired from a bench rest with sand bags, with ranges marked on the target.  Shooting was slow fire with most groups taking at least 5 minutes to complete, to give the ammo every bit of concentration and effort I had.  I did fire off hand in a few instances to take a better look at how the gun and ammo combination would do in a self defense situation.  The third part of this review will be shooting the Delta at longer ranges of 75, 100 and possibly 200 yards, to illustrate how the 10mm round really benefits from its higher velocity and power.

 

First, I want to talk about the big surprise for me. The Armscor ammo was a brand I have had little experience with.  The gun loved this ammo.  I have not verified its velocity or any specs on it other than bullet weight, but it was noticeably hotter than the other generic FMJ plinking and training ammo.  As far as I am concerned, for now, if I want ball ammo for the Delta or for any thing, this is what I will be using, until I find some other ball ammo that shoots better.

The PPU 180 grain hollow point was not so great and felt like a medium power load. Of course the dual spring system can be throwing off my judgement on account of it working so well to tame the 10mm recoil.   This group is normal for PPU ammo in my experience.  I have tried PPU match and have not seen it live up to any of its marketing claims. It is nice plinking ammo though and it has the benefit of being easy to find locally.

The Federal Trophy Bonded soft point is another round I have little experience with.  It shot great and would be a good choice for hunting if you are a believer in the bonded bullets from Federal. It could also serve double duty for self defense. I also fired a Federal Hydo Shock round, that shot about the same but I confess to losing the target it was shot on before I could take a picture.

The Winchester 175 grain Silver Tip hollow point. This is an old favorite of mine from back when the 10mm was  in its early days in the 80s.  A very good round and highly thought of at the time. It is still the first pick among a lot of people for CCW.   I  have had these rounds for a long time but a quick check at Midway showed me this round is still being made and sold.  It has always shot very well for me and was perfectly reliable in all three (3) of the Delta Elites I  have owned.  The Silver Tip is pretty well regarded by a lot of people including myself and if I was not a convert on the use of solid copper hollow points, this would be a load I would stock up on for daily carry.   Apologies for the blurred picture.

The Hornady Critical Duty with the flex tip shot outstanding, as the group above shows. I used this load as the “match load” standard, for accuracy and  for the rest of the tests for longer range groups.  Reports and testing show the round to be very effective on ballistic gel. Friends who have more experience with it, tell me it is superb.  Until I settle on a solid copper HP load for this gun , this is the load I have been using as a place holder in the gun for CCW.

The S&B  ball ammo seemed to always shoot 3 rounds tight and then toss the last 2.  It feels like a mid powered plinking round. Which it is. Good for training and plinking. Its not too expensive but nothing special.  I saw this ammo have problems in a Kimber 10mm and even a glock. If you want some ammo to plink with I would say it is ok,  but understand what you are getting.

Another offering from Hornady is the XTP round.  A good solid round that shots great. I would have been shocked if it didn’t.

This is a group fired off hand with the Fed American Eagle ball ammo.  I fired it off hand  as I had already put up the bags and my set up.  I happened upon just a few rounds of this ammo. I fired it offhand and it did about what I expected from it. It is always reliable and decent training quality ammo.

Now we get to trying the ammo in a method more in line with real world self defense.  This group is fired at 25 yards, off hand.  I did  shoot it at a slow methodical pace, to get the best out of itself and myself as I could.  I fired eight (8)  rounds of the Critical Duty ammo using the center of the large orange sticker as my aiming point.  I think  you can’t really ask for much more out of it.  The group would easily fit inside a target the size of a human face or inside something the size of a human heart.  This target group is one of the reasons this ammo is what I am currently using as the CCW ammo for the Delta.

For fun I took the gun out to 50 yards using the Hornady ammo.  I fired this group from the bags and bench.  I have to say I was pretty pleased with myself on this one! Too bad I couldn’t shoot that same level off hand at a bulls eye match.  This target shows you that the 10mm is fully capable of an easy hit on a man sized target at 100 yards, which we will be doing in part 3 of the review.

Of course with the group from the bags being as good as it was, I had to try it off hand at 50.  I fired ten (10) rounds off hand (though two handed) and got most of them on the target.  For my excuse, I am going to admit that buy this time I was getting pretty tired.  Shooting a 10mm for hours is harder work than  you may think.  It doesn’t have the nice soft push of a 45 ACP or childish slap of a 9mm. It starts to wear on you.  I am confident I could have done better if I started this fresh.

The new generation Delta Elite is proving itself to be everything I hoped it would be. It has already over taken the place in my heart the  older original version occupied.   After a little over 1,500 rounds so far, it has had no problems and has all the extra touches I want.  It has been my daily carry since I received it and it will be with me come hunting season.

In part 3 of the T&E of the new Delta, we will be shooting it out to as far as I can possible make a hit with it, to take advantage of the powerful 10mm round. We will be adding in some drills and training to get a handle on what a new 10mm user may have to get used to, if they are interested in moving up to a new level in power, by letting some one who has never fired a 10mm do some drills with it.  Check back in the next few weeks to see that and more.