Tag Archives: AR15

Home gunsmithing

It is said that people who own Harley Davidson tend to think ownership means qualified to work on them.

Same thing for gun owners.  Not I am not saying that you can’t work on your own guns, but you really need to know what you are doing.

All the time at the range I see failures in AR15s from not installing the stock correctly, fire control group springs in the wrong places.  Firearms unable to be zeroed due to improper sights and sight installation.  1911 and revolver triggers get tuned to the point of unreliability.

I have to be honest, I have done this my self.  Had the buffer retaining detent pop up and cause the hammer to not hit the firing pin.  Had a connector sold to me as “glock brand” cause reliability issues.  Broken screws and bolts using improper torque values.  The list goes on.

Many modern firearms are simple to work on.  However simple to work on does not equal fool proof.  Make sure you know what you are doing when you work on your firearms, and if you are not sure, get an experts help.

On muzzle devices

Various Surefire muzzle devices.

We have a multitude of wonderful options in muzzle devices now for our rifles.  However I have been seeing some odd trends that disturb me.  First I run into many people running muzzle breaks on short barreled rifle (SBR) variants. These short 5.56 rifles only gain marginal recoil reduction, and the cost of a large increase of flash and blast, almost always annoyingly so.  Several of the owners of these short rifles tell me that their rifle is their home defense gun.  I do hope that they never need to fire those rifles indoors with out hearing protection.  Pronged flash hiders are also coming back into style.  These tend to be more effective then closed ended flash hiders, but many will ring like a bell when tapped or as the rifle is discharged.  Sometimes prongs can be bent, or they can bloom like a flower.  I recommend against pronged flash hiders on full length rifles, and on firearms that are going to be used in think brush.  However these pronged flash hiders are an excellent choice for the sub-16 inch .30 cal rifle and for SBRs as they mitigate flash and blast better then many of the enclosed flash hiders.  One last note, some flash hiders have sharp edges, points, and/or barbs for use as a impact weapon.  I highly recommend against these as standard flash hiders work well in that role, and the expensive specialized ones end up just cutting holes in your range bags and cases.