Optic of the week: Leupold MK6 1-6 CMR-W 7.62

This is the most awesome optic that I am not going to recommend.

I’ve been selling off some of the stuff I wasn’t using. I ended up getting this scope in trade for a scope I wasn’t using and wasn’t going to use. I wouldn’t purchased this scope outright, but now that I have it, I really love it.

The MK6 1-6 is kind of an odd duck. It is most often seen with the CMR-W reticles which are most like an ACOG BDC with addition milradian hash marks and wind hold marks. It has a very bright daylight visible illumination, great turrets, an awesome 1x setting, a really nice battery cap, etc. But the list price is insane, and it is build for to be used in a way that I think makes it less preferable for most people.

There are two issues which I think makes the MK6 1-6 the wrong choice.
First is cost. MSRP is $2859.99
I’ve seen them sold used, with a mount for less than half that. Even so, that is pricey. While this scope is great, I wouldn’t pay that much for it. I only have once because I traded a much cheaper scope for it.

Second is the role of the scope.
There is a spectrum between speed and precision. A reflex sight is built for speed, and that 42X bench rest scope is built for precision. As magnification increases, users tend to want something geared more towards precision. This scope has a course BDC reticle and coarse adjustments, it is more like an ACOG+ than a mini-sniper scope. Most people I’ve talked to would rather have a mini-sniper scope these days. Now we have all sorts of new 1-8X and 1-10X that better fit that role over this scope. It is as if this scope is obsolete before it came to the market.

The glass is imported, so it doesn’t say “Made in the USA” I’ve yet to meet someone who doesn’t agree that foreign glass is better.

The turrets on this scope lock at zero and have a button to release them. If you press the button and turn it away from zero, they are no longer locked and you can turn them normally. Each click is clearly felt and barely audible. I found it really easy to set the zero on these as once I loosen the cap, turning it to zero locked the rotation, allowing me to just re tighten the screws. I would be perfectly happy if all my scopes had turrets like these.

These scopes turrets are .2 milradian adjustments. So about .72MOA per click. This allows the user to dial in up to about a 900m zero in a single turn, but also clearly shows that this is not a scope for precision shooting. I don’t think of this as a downside, but it is certainly an unpopular choice.

This is the best scope at 1X I have ever used. It felt the most like an Aimpoint than any other.

If you are properly aligned with the scope, the illumination is amazing. At 1X it is the flattest, nicest, most Aimpoint like view I have seen out of a magnified scope. But due to the lighting system this scope uses, if you are slightly off axis it dims greatly.

Lined up and the reticle is very bright
Move your head slightly and it dims.

The CMR-W BDC reticle is in meters. The 5.56 version goes to 900m (about 984 yards) and the 7.62 version goes to 1200m.

The center dot is for 200m. To the left and right there are mRad hash marks and a mRad vertical scale on the left. Along side the bullet drop chart there are wind lead marks for 10 and 20 mile per wind hold. Also on the left side of each distance there is a range finding tool.

A side note, I highly recommend when you are zeroing a scope, that is new to you, to start at close distances. This scope is was set 9 inches low at 25 yards. Had I started at 50 or 100 yards I would have been well off the target.

The battery compartment has a recessed button and flips open

The battery compartment makes for easy and fast battery changes and removes the chance of cross threading a cover back on. For the optics with short battery life, they all should have battery compartments like this.

The 20mm objective lens looks tiny in the 34mm tube.

I really enjoy shooting with and using this scope. But I do not recommend anyone buy one. Doubly so at list price. Optics design and tech is rapidly advancing. Now there are cheaper and smaller 1-8X scopes like the Nightforce NX8. When I first used the MK6 I thought it felt heavy and clunky. I was sort of surprised when I read it is the same weight as some much smaller scopes I own. It isn’t really heavy for what it is, but it is large. I think it feels clunky and overkill for an AR15, but less of a long range precision scope than you would want on a .308 Semi Auto.

It is a great scope, but if I was spending fresh cash, I would rather spend far less cash on newer scopes.

My Colt 6940 FDE

Some time back Colt did a limited run of FDE anodized LE6920 and LE6940 models. I’ve heard there was something like 300 of these tan 6940s made, and 1500 of the 6920s.

Shawn was a pretty early adopter of the monolithic upper model of the 6940. He wrote a nice write about the 6940 back in 2012. You can see it here. When the FDE 6940 came out, he picked one up and switched to it.

An old picture of Shawn’s FDE 6940

I always thought how he has his rifle set up is pretty practical. So years later when I picked up a LE6945, a shorter barreled 6940, I set it up similarly.

My LE6945

Every so often I would see one of those limited run FDE 6940s come up for sale. Often $3000+. Insane.
Then I saw one for sale just a little over what I thought was reasonable, so I snatched it up.

This rifles comes out of the box ready for use, it even included a nice accessory kit I teased about here.

The kit comes with 2 mags, sling, cleaning kit, ladder covers, manual, a vertical forward grip, and a QD sling swivel.

Now I could write about this rifles performance, reliability, etc. But being it is a Colt, I think you what is going to be said. Now sometime down the road I plan to do some accuracy testing, but that hasn’t happened yet.

The 6940 has two heat shields in the hand guards. One above the gas tube and one at the bottom to help protect the shooters hand from heat when rapid firing.

The bottom rail is removable when you press a recessed button.
A 6940 has a 16″ M4 profile barrel. A notch in the upper receiver allows for a M203 grenade launcher to be mounted.

The 6940 model is a great gun, but I think it has a similar problem the FN SCAR has. It is a product of an older time. Now people want longer slick hand-guards, greater molecularity, etc. It is great at what it is, but you are limited to what you can change on it.

So what did I change on mine?

The Magpul MOE stock and grip on the rifle are fine, but I replaced them with the CTR (with extended pad) and A2 grip as I prefer. I removed the Magpul winter trigger guard and replaced it with a standard trigger guard (why?). A Tango Down stubby VFG was added to the hand guard. This rifle will normally wear an Aimpoint T-1 with a 300m zero. A KAC Ambi-Safety & Norgon Ambi-Catch aid in making the rifle more ambidextrous.

Eventually I’d like to swap out the Magpul rear sight for a KAC 2-600m sight. I’m also going to add a Surefire Warcomp so I can mount my silencer. I’d like to add Surefire Scout Light, once I can find another one cheap. Other than that, it is as it will be. I just need to shoot it more.

Build a 9mm AR15 Pistol, I don’t like it.

Bottom Line Up Front: 9mm AR moves more than 5.56 ARs, made me not like the 9mm pistol configuration.

Long rambling explanation below:

Recoil has multiple components. There is the muzzle rise AKA muzzle flip. There is the rearwards force. There is also the intensity or how drawn out that recoil is. Some guns are a push and some are snappy.

For example, some say that .40 S&W has less recoil than .45 ACP, but .40 is snappier due to the recoil being in a shorter time which can make it harder to control.

The Colt pattern 9mm AR15s are blow back operated. Because of this they have heavier bolts and buffers giving them a good bit more mass moving during the recoil of the firearm.

So these blow back 9mm AR15s (well this does apply to all blow back guns) have a more violent recoil then the rarer pistol caliber carbines that are not blow back.

Note that I said “more violent”, not just more or bad. These 9mm ARs are still pleasant to shoot, especially due to the greatly decreased muzzle blast.

So where am I going with this? When I finally got out and shot this 9mm AR pistol I found it moved a good bit with each shot. Shooting accurately was easy. But shooting fast wasn’t.

I was surprised at how well I shot the pistol off hand. Using the iron sights and also an Aimpoint, I was easily shooting tight groups, nearly cloverleafs at 5-20 yards. In hindsight I really should have kept that target. But the gun moved so much off target with each shot I was really off-put by the whole experience.

Now if I had a pistol brace it would probably be a whole different story.

Anyways. I decided I am going to sell this 10.5 inch 9mm upper, and just replace it with a full 9mm rifle. Maybe a Colt 6951. And I have already swapped the pistol over into a 5.56 configuration.

LaRue, Colt, KAC Battle Carbines Compared Part 1

Happy Thanksgiving all.

Today I am thankful that I got to try a few different rifles this morning.  I did side by side shooting of a Larue 7.62 Ultimate Upper rifle, Colt LE901-16SE, and a KAC SR25-EC.

It isn’t really fair to directly compare these as there are some major differences between them.  Sort of like comparing apples to apples to oranges.  But that never stopped me from being critical about things before.

This first comparison will be short.  I had these three rifles available to me so I decided I would start with 20 rounds each rapid fire with an Aimpoint T-1.  I would do some rapid engagements of a target at 10 yards, and do some double taps at 10 yards.  I ended up firing 32 rounds from the Larue due to functioning issues, and only 20 from the others.  Not exactly a comprehensive test, but a start.

From top to bottom, KAC, Larue, Colt.  20 round groups rapid fire off hand at 10 yards.  Mostly rapid pairs.

I shot the Colt LE901-16SE first.  When Colt release the 901, they first released the LE901-16S, which was a full railed model.  I believe they sold a few -18S with an 18 inch barrel.
After that, they release the -16SE.  They shaved a pound off the rifle by replacing the quad rail on the monolithic hand guard with a proprietary modular rail.  This model appears to have been discontinued and the newest model, the CM762 adds an ambi safety, longer MLOK hand guard, and an ambi charging handle.  The new model is also available in 6.5 Creedmoor with a 18 inch barrel.

The rifle is is stock configuration with a Aimpoint T-1 added to it for the comparison.  With the exemption of the lack of an ambi safety, I found the controls on this rifle to be the best.  The right side bolt release is easier to hit, the larger and lower left side mag release gives more leverage and is easier to use.

The list weight on the -16SE is 8.4 pounds.  When I shot it I found it tended to recoil straight up.  I felt that it was fast and easy to shoot, but my performance on paper was the worst with it.  Back when I the 901-16S side by side with the 901-16SE, I found that that 1 additional pound of weight made the fully railed 901-16S have much less felt recoil.

The Ultimate Upper is an economy large frame rifle kit from Larue Tactical.  You can purchase the upper kit in SR25 or DPMS pattern.  If you buy a kit you can buy a Larue lower for it.  This isn’t really a fair comparison to the others as I added a Surefire Warcomp to this rifle.  The Warcomp can drastically reduce recoil.  I think this gave the Larue the major advantage in shooting.  But I had multiple short strokes when shooting the Larue.  I fired an additional 12 rounds at another target trying to diagnose the issue and trying out the offset sights.

The Larue lower is the only one of the bunch that isn’t ambidextrous.  I find the bolt catch on it harder to use than the one on the 901.  Not hard on its own, but less easy than the 901.  The receiver extension on the Larue is AR10 pattern, but doesn’t have the hole locations to collapse the stock completely.  The photo above shows the stock as closed as it will go.  This made the UU kit rifle longer than the others.

The Safety Level that Larue includes in their parts kit is horrible.  I have two of these Larue safeties and they don’t move positively.  Several times when I was bringing the rifle up for a fast aimed shot, attempting to flick the safety off it would only move half way.  I did not have any issues with the safeties on the other rifles.

The recoil spring on the Larue is much lighter and easier to work the action than the other two .308 rifles.  Felt more like racking a standard AR15.  When firing the action felt like it moved much slower than the other rifles.  I think this also made it feel more controllable and easier to shoot well it – when it worked.  Compared to the others, shooting the Larue Ultimate Upper kit felt like shooting one of the other rifles in slow motion.  I’m going to start calling this the LTUU762 for Larue Tactical Ultimate Upper.

Unlike the others, the KAC SR25-EC uses a rifle length gas system on the 16 inch barrel.  I had always heard that the KAC SR25 were so extremely smooth shooting.  Much to my disappointment it didn’t seem any better than the others.

The SR25s for a long time not have come with ambi controls.  The right side safety is scalloped and the rifle has a right side bolt release.  The rifle weighs about 2 pounds heavier than the other rifles.  This was noticeable in the handling and recoil characteristics.

When shooting the SR25-EC it recoiled straight up.  Settles right back down on target.  To me it seemed like it had similar recoil to the 901, but the 901 is about 2 pounds lighter.

I think it was the lighter two stage trigger on the KAC that helped me shoot it rapidly better than the standard AR15 trigger on the 901.

So?

Right now, if I had to pick one for a fight it would be the 901.  Even thought I shot it worst in this side by side comparison, it is far lighter than the KAC, and the LTUU7.62 is currently unreliable.  I previously had a Warcomp and match trigger in the 901, and it drastically reduced recoil and made it easier to shoot.  I returned it to stock before this comparison.

I’ll be talking more about these rifles in the future.

A look at the 5.56 Larue Ultimate Upper

Some years back I wanted a Larue Tactical PredatAR upper.  They didn’t sell the uppers separately so I bought an entire rifle and sold the Larue lower.  I sold the lower for $500 and it sold in 15 minutes.

Guess I should have priced it higher.

At first mounted a muzzle break on it, and while that pretty much eliminated recoil on that light gun, but made for a gun I didn’t really enjoy shooting.

Later, I replaced the Surefire MB556 break with a Warcomp and the upper quickly became one of my favorite setups.  I later had it Cerakoted.

Light weight, smooth shooting, and accurate.

 

So I wanted more like that.  First, a similar rifle in .308.  So a while back I picked up a Larue 7.62 Ultimate Upper kit.  I ordered it about 4 months ago, I also ordered a lower to go along with it, which I am still waiting on.

I thought about picking up a second PredatAR.  But I saw there was the newer cheaper Ultimate Upper line.  The Ultimate Uppers are the newest in Larue Tacticals line.  You get a customizable kit including everything except a lower.  You have a variety of caliber options, barrel lengths, profiles, etc.  They have small frame options (AR15), and Large Frame.  In the Large Frame they have SR25/AR10 options and DPMS pattern.

So while the Larue 7.62 Ultimate Upper is pretty useless to me until Larue Tactical gets around to shipping me a lower for it, I have been really impressed by the kit.  So I bought a Larue 5.56 Ultimate Upper.

 

Unfortunately I wasn’t smart enough to snap photos of the 5.56 kit when it arrived.  So here is a couple of the 7.62 kit.

 

The 5.56 kit was similar.

I dunno why, but I decided to go with the standard weight 16 inch 5.56 barrel instead of the lightweight PredatAR profile.  I choose the MLOK over the Keymod hand guard option.  It seems to me that MLOK is winning the modular handguard war.

 

Larue added some sort of additional seal on the gas tube and gas block.  To quote Mark Larue, “It’s the new style – gas leaks bug me.”

The hand guard profile is quite small and narrow.

The upper kit was quick and easy to assembly.  I replaced the Larue muzzle break with a Surefire flash hider mount.

I initially threw an Aimpoint on the upper, made for a pretty handy configuration.

But I decided for the second outing that I would throw a Leupold MK6 on it and see what it could do.  I found I had a few rounds of Black Hills 75gr BTHP Match left, so I gave that a try.

I fired 3 rounds of M855 to get on target, then a couple of 3 shot groups (as I am very low on Black Hills match ammo).

Shooting at these 3/4 inch dots at 100 yards, my two quick 3 shots groups measured about 7/8 and 3/4 inch respectively.

So, I think it has potential.  I am going to have to do some more shooting for groups with this upper before I decide how it is going to be set up.

If the Leupold MK6 were to stay on it, I would move it forward as I prefer to shoot nose to the charging handle and I can’t do that with the current setup.

I really like the UU upper, and I think it is a great deal.  But I do need to point out a few things.

The UU upper is like a budget high end gun.  Larue changed the profile of the upper to something quite angular, most likely for ease of machining.  Less steps in the mill means faster and cheaper.

This angular profile is new to me.  I can’t think of anything similar from other brands.  The VLTOR MUR was similar, but didn’t take it to this extreme.

So, for example, it doesn’t have any profiling to blend into the curvature of the rear of the lower.

And the chamfer is extreme enough that there is a gap between the upper and lower above the mag catch.

So, if you are one of these nuts where fit and finish is the final say on if you like a firearm or not.  You have to decide if these little things would bug you.

Buying a UU upper lets you order a Larue lower.  But apparently on the factory assembled rifles they hand match the uppers to the lowers.  If you buy them separately with the kit, that won’t happen.  So once again, if you are a fit and finish freak, caveat emptor.

If not, I think the UU upper kits are a tremendous deal.  It does take away from the fun of picking each part your self, but you know you are getting quality and parts that will work together.

I really like mine.  Enough so that I ordered a Larue lower to go with it.  Now it is just to see how many months it will take them to ship it out.