Tag Archives: 5.56/.223

How To Record Your Bullets In Flight

Recording projectiles flying to the target is a very simple process, and it produces some neat results that you can take home with you on film after your done at the range.

A up to date camera is a must. I used to film with a standard definition camera, and when you zoomed in the mirage made everything turn to pot. With the HD camera, mirage still occurs, but you can still see whats going on down range better than with an old camera.

The camera I used is a Panasonic HC-V270 with 90x optical / digital zoom. This is a budget camera that runs a 1080p picture in 60 FPS. Nothing special and by no means a pricey piece of equipment.

Place the camera next to your position and zoom in on the target. Ensure that you are recording more of the space above the target than below since our bullet will arch to the target.

For even better results, shoot with the sun behind you and you might capture an image of the bullet itself as it fly’s downrange. In this case, I was fortunate to capture a 75 gr Hornady fly to a 600 yard gong.

I hope you can record some very cool shots. Anyone have a 45/70?

Happy Bullet Trails!

The Razor HD II at 6 Months: Versatility at a Price

Razor HDII

I have been using the Razor HD II for about 6 months. It’s a well-known optic, and there are many good reviews online for the piece already. They discuss its weight, its features, its huge eye-box, and they discuss X, Y, or Z… but they seem to neglect the real meat and potatoes of the optic. The Razor HD II is a Jack of All Trades.

I studied my options for weeks before I chose the Razor. $1400 isn’t chump change. It cost more than the ACOG it replaced, but looking at the optic from a shooters perspective can give us some good reasons to go with a high-end variable over a ACOG.

Razor HD rear

First and foremost, the optic I chose has a JM-BDC1 reticle. This reticle is a BDC calibrated for multiple loadings. The ranging marks are good for 9 inch wide target, and not the shoulder width of the typical BDC stadia. For ranging purposes on a human silhouette, the head must be used instead of the shoulders to measure an accurate range. I don’t consider this good or bad, just different.

Razor HD II
Click to Enlarge

What is good though, is that the BDC mirrors several important loadings very well. 55 and 62 grain ammo will match the stadia out of 16 inch and longer systems well with a sight in at + – 100 yards. Heavier ammo in the 69-77 grain range will match the stadia closely if zeroed at 200 yards. This makes the razor a good system for people who might be switching rifles or ammo types and haven’t settled on a specific loading.

Furthermore, since it’s a second focal plane optic, we can also modify the bullet drop by dialing back a bit on the magnification. Very oddly… i found that, according to Strelok Ballistic Calculator, the Razor HD would calibrate very well at 3x for a 12 inch .300 blackout firing supersonic loadings. Also the 9 inch stadia (calibrated at 6x) become 18 inch stadia at 3x so suddenly this optic can be capably used for a loading it wasn’t designed for…

Obviously experimentation is necessary to identify loadings that match well to the stadia and which level of magnification will further align with the bullet drop. Since the Razor is offered in Mil-Rad and MOA reticles as well, you can go that route too instead of tweaking things like I do with the JM-BDC-1.

The illumination is daylight bright, and is a single dot in the center of the cross-hairs. Is it red dot bright? Yes. The Razor’s field of view at 1x and bright red dot make this a devastating variable up close.

When you are stretching the optics legs, you can take off the caps and dial in your dope. Underneath the caps the optic is waterproof so no need to worry about leaving the turrets exposed. The important thing to note here is that takes a full 50 minutes of rotation to go past your zero. Since it doesn’t have zero stops, the huge amount of rotation should keep you from getting lost in the dial. If you are shooting 5.56 in a 0-600 yard setting you would need to shoot one slow… derpy loading to need to rotate the dial past 25 minutes.

Vortex RAzor HD II up close

Wind corrections are also marked and can go 25 minutes either way.

The Razor HD II has plenty of stiff competition. There are many options at the Razor HD’s $1300 price point, but I think it has a nice mix of features to allow you to shoot it in a variety of ways to extract the most value for your dollar. Not to mention the glass is beautiful. Overall, I believe an optic like this goes well on a general purpose gun. It’s not specialized enough to give a precision minded shooter the tools he / she needs for long-range work, and it’s not as light and fast on target as a red dot. It, like many other variables… operates in that niche where it is a jack of all trades, but a master of none. That said, it has more going for it than many other variables I have handled due to its combination of features.

Lothaen

+ Glass is clear

+ Turrets are hard to get lost in

+ Water proof with or without caps

+ Can be very versatile if you experiment

+ Red dot bright illumination

+ BDC, MOA or Mil-Rad options available

– weight

– heavyness

+ increases physical endurance

Colt 6933

Colt 6933 ACOG

This is a Colt 6933 (well actually a 6945 lower with a 6933 upper). The factory trigger was replaced with a Geissele SSA trigger. A KAC M4 RAS was added to provide a quad rail and add some weight to the front of the gun. The carry handle was removed and replaced with a Matech rear sight. The TA31F ACOG scope was installed because I tried to sell it but no one wanted a $500 beat up ACOG.

It is not as light and handy as a stock 6933, but it is a fun little setup.

Colt 6945 & the Geissele Super 3 Gun trigger

I bought a Colt 6945.  Why?  Because I wanted one.  Good enough reason for me.

Colt 6945

 

I ordered the rifle Feburary from Gun Gallery.  In September the tax stamp finally came back from the ATF and I picked it up.  The staff at Gun Gallery were friendly and helpful, so I would purchase from them again.

The Colt 6945 is a short barreled rifle (SBR) version of the Colt 6940.  This rifles 10.3 inch barrel is the main difference from the standard 6940, and is why it is a title II firearm which required me to pay a $200 dollar tax stamp to get it.

The 6940 series of rifles have a monolithic upper with a removable bottom rail.  The barrel uses a proprietary barrel extension and gas tube.  Shawn and others have reported that their 6940s have superb accuracy due to these changes.  Personally I don’t plan to try and use this as a precision rifle, so its no difference to me.

The best thing about a short barreled AR15 is the pure modularity of it.  I can easily swap upper for various barrel lengths and calibers.

2014-09-21 12.01.11

 

So I really like my 6945.

Colt 6945

 

Since getting it I have run six different uppers on it.  That is one of the great things about a SBR AR15 is the ability to easily change the uppers for difference barrel lengths and calibers.  I also swapped out the stock trigger for a Geissele Super 3 Gun trigger.

I have several Geissele SSA triggers and I highly recommend them.  I wanted to try the Super 3 Gun (S3G) trigger, so I picked one up a while back.  First it was installed in a LMT lower, where it would often double & rarely fail to reset after a shot was fired.  So it was quickly removed from that lower(I have had other issues with that lower before).  When the got the Colt, I went and tried the S3G trigger in it.  Now in the Colt, the S3G trigger worked fine when shooting offhand or from the bench.  However due to the very short reset, when I was firing from a bipod I experienced unintentional doubles.  This trigger might be great for someone who wants to bump fire, but the reset is a little too short for me.  I wouldn’t recommend the S3G for any serious fighting rifles, but I do recommend the Geissele SSA and the Colt 6945 as they are awesome.

Video: Larry Vickers on SOCOM weapon clones.

Larry Vickers posted up a nifty eight minute video about some of the copies of US SOCOM firearms available.

Unfortatly he only covers some of the ones made by High Caliber Sales(HCS).  I purchased a HCS MK12MOD1 upper and had to return it due to the multiple issues it had.  Also they have started using Bolt Carrier Groups that are not staked, cheaper non-Colt receiver, etc.  I can not recommend High Caliber Sales due to my bad experience with them.

The supply of MK12 parts is drying up.  If you want one, it will be better to get it sooner rather than later.  Items like the correct handguards (for both the MK12MOD0 and the MK12MOD1) are getting much harder to source.

Brass over bolt in a Tavor and a broken Perazzi shotgun spring.

I was helping out on the range when one of the Range Officers asked me to help clear a jammed Tavor.  The owner was attempting to use a Surefire 60 round mag and had a brass over bolt malfunction and could not clear it.

Tavor malfunction

Tavor malfunction

What surprised me is when I easily cleared the visible jammed round the action wouldn’t cycle.  Turns out there was a second live round jammed up in there.  The follow bound in the Surefire 60 round mag allowing multiple rounds up into the action.  How they got up and back in the action I don’t know.   For any one who reads this who has used a Tavor and Surefire mags, how well has it worked for you?

 

A friend of mine showed me this broken spring from his Perazzi shotgun.

Perazzi shotgun broken spring

Perazzi shotgun broken spring

This spring for the lower barrel of a Perazzi shotgun reached the end of its service life and was replaced.  Fortunately this particular shotgun came with two spares of this spring so the owner can keep it ready for competition.  It is good to have spare parts for firearms you depend on. Often it is even better to have a complete working spare firearm.

Review: Daniel Defense A1.5 rear sight

It does what it suppose to do.

Daniel Defense A1.5

 

The DD A1.5 rear sight is an A1 style rear sight that attaches to your railed upper receiver.  Instead of having the M16/M16A1 type aperture Daniel Defense uses the M16A2 aperture.

To install the sight you need to completely remove the screw that will hold it on.  Then you slide it on from the front or the rear of the upper.  You may need to remove your hand guard or your charging handle to do so.

The sight is very light and simple.  The only complaint I could have about it is that the rear sight aperture is farther forward on this sight then on most other rear sights.

If you use this sight, keep in mind that the M16A2 rear sight aperture is not same plane, so the concept is to have a 300m zero on the small peep then the larger 0-2 sight will have a 200m zero useful for low light or moving targets.