The Innovative Glock in 1991

Today’s post was written by Miami_JBT from ARFCOM. He was kind enough to let me share it here.

Shooters coming of age today don’t understand how good they have it.

In 1991, the gun industry was to a degree a stagnant, faltering, lethargic beast that it couldn’t innovate its way out of a wet paper bag. Designs were moving forward on a snail’s pace. Yes, there was the jump from Revolvers to Semiautomatics but the layout and designs were still cemented in old ideas.

Metal Framed, DA/SA, Hammer Fired Guns. Sig Sauer, Beretta, Smith & Wesson, Ruger, CZ, etc all mirrored each other when it came to 9mm platforms. Make a gun that is basically a Hi-Power in size, with similar capacity, and make it double action capable. Even HK at the time was still pushing their amazingly expensive P7 series.

GLOCK was the outlier. We all know the story by know and why. Lightweight, Polymer Framed, Striker Fired, extremely High Capacity compared to the competitors at the time, etc, etc, etc.

Well, why did I mention 1991? Because in 1991, the .45 ACP was still a popular duty round and a number of agencies wanted it even though .40 S&W was released a year before. But the problem with .45 ACP was capacity. Always was an issue and that is one reason why .40 S&W did so well. Anyways, back to the main topic at hand. .45 ACP prior to 1991 was mostly relegated to single stack guns with 7rd or 8rd capacities. They were big, heavy beasts too.

But in 1991 two guns were released. One that clearly shows you the old mindset and one that showed you the innovation GLOCK had and was.

The Ruger P90 was released in 1991 and was a fine representation of how outdated a number of companies were. Here you have a gun as complicated as a 1911, as large as a 1911, with a 7rd capacity and a weight of 34oz. Yes, the P90 was a reliable gun but it was a beast of a gun. The ergos were shit and the gun was covered in sharp edges. But the most glaring issue is 7rd capacity in 1991. Trigger pull was average for the era, 9lbs to 10lbs in DA and 3lbs to 4lbs in SA.

By 1991, the market was screaming for higher capacity. It was the era of the Cocaine and Crack Epidemic, a rise in perceived violent crime, and a perception that cops were being outgunned by bad guys (which to a degree, they were). And what Ruger released for the .45 ACP duty makret was a 7rd, DA/SA, 1911 sized and weighted gun to compete with the other outdated designs like the S&W 4506, Sig Sauger P220, and of course the 1911 itself.

Amazingly, GLOCK released the G21 the same year.

Here, you have a .45 ACP chambered automatic that held 13rds of ammunition, and weighed 26.0oz. That’s almost a 1/2 pound lighter in weight than the P90. And it basically held twice the amount of ammunition. The gun was smooth for the most part. Not rough or sharp edges. A simplistic constant trigger pull that weighed in at 5.5lbs.

The overall design was simple, reduced in complexity, and worked extremely well. The G21 invalidated every .45 ACP on the market. The S&W 4506, Sig P220, Ruger P90, and especially the 1911 was dinosaur waiting to be killed off by the fallout from the asteroid strike. To put things in perspective, the G21 weighed less than a Beretta 92FS, Sig Sauer P226, S&W 5903, and all of it contemporaries Wonder Nine era guns.

It was that radically different.

Shooters coming of age today have no grasp or understanding how revolutionary this was. Honestly, the arrival of GLOCK in the 80s and early 90s completely changed the design layout and mindset of the handgun industry. New shooters today complain about a G21 being big or heavy. It they only knew…. and I say this as a fan of the DA/SA Wonder Nines and Boat Anchor DA/SA Single Stack .45 ACP guns. They’re all outdated and GLOCK is the reason why.

Whether you like or dislike GLOCK, the market wouldn’t be what it is today without them.

A warning about shills

About a year ago I saw a scammer make eighty thousand dollars in about 3 hours. Oh boy was I jealous. I’m in the wrong line of work. Sadly my ethics won’t allow me to do what he did.

I grew up reading gun magazines. Those were always fun to read. But I never saw a bad review of an item.

A review of an Auto Ordnance 1911 mentioned having so much metal shave off inside the action that it jammed the gun. The reviewer still said that it would be a good choice for a new shooter. That is just plain ethically wrong to promote unreliable junk that someone’s life might end up depending on. But I suppose those big bucks of being a gun writer just are more important.

One of the NRA magazines had a list of the top 10 pistols and they left Beretta off the list. Beretta threatened to pull their advertising, so the NRA dedicated the following magazine to Beretta products.

Those are just a couple of quick example that pop up from memory. I saw a new one today about IraqVeteran8888 (IV8888). Forged From Freedom showed how IV8888 was paid $6000 per video for four videos ($24,000 total) to promote Olight products. IV8888 did so while claiming to be impartial.

Picture from ForgedFromFreedom.

ForgedFromFreedom has come out showing this only because IV8888 shorted them the cash they felt they deserved. The were perfectly fine with what IV8888 was doing when they thought they would be paid to help.

You see can ForgedFromFreedom’s side of the story here:

https://www.forgedfromfreedom.com/blogs/news-1/why-forged-from-freedom-iraqveteran8888-iv8888-broke-up

Remember, this is the same IV8888 that after he claimed he was never paid to review a product, Yankee Marshall showed his price sheet where IV8888 charges up to $4000 for a positive gun review.

As always, don’t just believe what you see online. Do some research for your self. Unless it is posted on LooseRounds.com, then you know you can trust it. And Olight, have one of your reps use our contact form, we could use some money too.

WILSON COMBAT VICKERS 1911 MAGAZINE

Wilson Combat has been making in my opinion the best 1911 mags for years now. The 47D being a gold standard. A while ago they worked with Larry Vickers to make what he thought the perfect mag for a 1911 should be.

Larry explains it all in the video. I have to say now that I have had one for a while after paying nearly 60 yankee green backs for it, I have to tell you it is one hell of a great magazine.

In the picture above you can see the Vickers mag with the older mag design and the newer mag. As LAV says in the video, all the holes are closed up on the Vickers mag. This keeps out dirt or anything else that could possible get in and cause an oopsie.

I really like the metal floorplate/bump pad.

I have used this mag in 12 different guns and fired close to 1,000 rounds with it in the various guns. What can I say other than it works like a Wilson Combat mag. Is it worth the 50plus dollars? Eh… that I don’t know. If it was as much as the other mags I would buy it exclusively. As it is, I don’t see me doing that. I have 100 percent faith with the other Wilson mags and have never had any trouble with them so I won’t be replacing them with the Vickers Tactical mags unless there is about a 20 dollar drop in price. IF the price doesn’t bother you and you really have trouble keeping crud out of your mags I can say they are worth it. They are damned nice though.

Golf tips for the discerning shooter Part 1

I often tell people you can take golf training tips and replace golf with “shooting” and they apply.

Yesterday, at work, one of the vendors I purchase from sent me a calendar that has golf tips.  Let us have some fun and see how well they apply to shooting.

All credits goes to whom ever made that golfing calendar.

Lets look at the advise for December 2018:

Golf is the most fun you can have without taking your clothes off.

Chi Chi Rogriguez

Replace “Golf” with “Shooting” in that quote and I would agree.

There are plenty of ways to work on your long and short game in the off season.  Up the difficulty of the shots on your practice may by placing a tee upside down on a coin and try to touch it with out knocking it over.  This will be nearly impossible but will greatly improve your control.  To work on your chipping, place a towel or garbage can about to feet away and practice getting whiffle balls to drop on the towel or in the garbage.  For your drive, head out to the garage and swing a weighted club.  Doing this all winter will make swinging your normal driver feel effortless.

Calendar

So. . .

They are saying you should dry fire when you can not get out to the range.  If you are sick or snowed in, you can still dry fire at home for free.  Other practice alternatives can include air rifles, air soft, etc, to help you get practical trigger time when you are at home.

Also they say it is good to vary it up with harder to shoot, heavier, or greater recoiling guns.  If you practice a little shooting double action only with your revolver your Glock or 1911 trigger is going to seem even easier to shoot.  If you practice shooting a heavier guns, your standard guns are going to feel lighter.  I like doing the occasional practice with a .40 or my Glock 30 as it makes shooting the 9mm seem like nothing.  Just the same with rifles.  If you can run a 308 rifle well in rapid fire, the 5.56 will seem trivially easy.  Make practice harder than what you expect to need to do.

Standby for the next installment of golf advice for shooters.

More Random Interesting Things

Today I decided to do another post about things I have run across or  crosses my mind. Like the first time  I did this it will be images I found interesting or noteworthy.

First off is a first.  Serial number 1 Colt model of 1911.   It doesn’t get any more historic than that.

On that note, here is a colt recently shown by RIA.   A great example of the gunmaker and engravers art.

This is an interesting picture I ran across on a facebook page about the Vietnam war.   A soldier that is a radio operator who seems to not have liked to the idea of not carrying anything.   But the part that sticks out is the “sniper rifle”.  I don’t think it is a Model 70 based on the shape of the stock and rear sight.  It may be a M700.   An optic has been mounted to the gun by some one.  In this case the optic appears to be the m84 optic originally put on the sniper variants of the M1 Garand.   Some did end up being used on M14s during the war when sniper rifles were urgently needed.

More on sniper stuff is this SOF cover of a kinda well known image.  Taken during the invasion of Iraq, it’s a USMC sniper team.  I have always liked this picture.  It really gives us a look back on how much has changed since then.  Changes in guns and gear  has been rapid since things started in 2001.

Seems the russians have a  interesting way of training prospective snipers.

 

Jerry “Mad Dog” Shriver, MIA in during the Vietnam war while on a cross border top secret operation.   I think everyone who would come to a site like this has heard of him.  A few months ago on one of the militaria collectors forum shared something he was able to secure from Green Beret Shriver’s mother.

The dress uniform  may or may not have been worn by the legend. It was used at  the funeral service for Shriver. An empty casket as real life action hero’s body  has never been recovered to date.

Above is the picture of  1 carbine owned by another legend. The gun was owned my Audie Murphy and given to a friend. the mags are still taped up  the way Murphy had them with  the same ammo it came with when gifted to his friend.

Last is a bit of humor I ran across that gave me a good laugh.