Ranges Notes

Had a Colt 6920 with a Trijicon TA31-MRD ACOG and a Spikes 5.45 with a TA31-ECOS ACOG side by side at the range today.  Both were zeroed using the 300m point of aim at 25 meters.  Later that day, both were used to shoot at a steel target at 565 yards(about 500 meters).  The Colt using M855 ammo and the ACOG calibrated for that ammo was right on for elevation when using the 500m mark.  However when shooting at 500m with the 5.45 and an identical 5.56 Bullet Drop Chart reticle, the 5.45 corresponded to the 400 meter mark on the BDC.

It was interesting to see how much flatter the 5.45 was flying compared to the same zero at the M4.  I’ve never been able to find good data on the ballistic coefficient of the 5.45 7n6 rounds, or readable info on its trajectory.

Mark Serbu and the BFG-50A

Mark Serbu with BFG-50A

On Thursday I had the pleasure of meeting Mark Serbu and getting to fire a couple of shots through the new Serbu BFG-50A semi-auto .50 cal rifle.  I was already familiar with his products as the Serbu Super-Shorty shotgun is often seen at the local machinegun shoots and in the occasional movie.

Serbu was function checking and breaking in some rifles that his company was getting ready so ship out.  While his BFG-50 bolt action has been on the market for a while, the semi-auto 50A is relatively new.  Firing this .50 was very pleasant, but it does provide bystander with a good bit of blast from its effective muzzle break.  It uses the same mags as the Barrett M82/M107.  Couple of the best things about the BFG-50A is that it is lighter, and cheaper then the Barrett semi-auto .50s.  Sadly, due to high-winds knocking down target frames, we did not get to see how well the BFG-50A groups.  I look forward to seeing more of these at the range.

Thanks to Mr. Serbu for answering my questions and letting me take his picture.  He indicated that he is working on a pistol for his next project.

More information about Serbu’s products can be found at Serbu.com

On Back Up Sights

I have seen many arguments online about the necessity of back up sights on a rifle using optics.  The general concensious seems to be that they are needed on military rifles, but not on civilian rifles.  This is not the case.

In the military people work in teams and are almost never alone.  Should a rifle go down it is not really an issue as you still have many other people capable of continuing the fight.  For the civilian and the police officer this is often not the same.  If someone wakes up in their home and finds the battery dead in their reflex sighted rifle it helps to have iron sights.  However if a Marine’s optics fails, he is only reducing his squads fighting ability by 1/13 its firepower.

So do you need back up irons?  First needs to consider if the rifle is a toy, or a tool for fighting.  If it is a toy, back up sights are not necessary.  If it is a fighting tool, look at its role and how it is set up.  If you are running battery powered optics or magnified optics on quick detach mounts, I would suggest back up sights.  So if you need to use a wrench to remove your optic, back up sights may not be practical for you and you may be better off switching to a different weapon.

“Damn, the batteries are dead.”  Is not an uncommon saying at the range I work at.  Not only among cheap optics with poor battery life, but often about Eotechs.  Batteries discharge, cheap batteries and cheap optics drain even faster.  Even the best optics can be broken.  On the range this is just an annoyance, for the Soldier or Marine it means that their buddies will have to take up the slack.  However if you, as a lone civilian or law enforcement officer, have this happen in the fight, the results can be costly.

I highly recommend back up sights on the individuals fighting rifle.  If you are fighting by your self, being able to keep your weapon in the fight is crucial.

On that note, also make sure to keep your back up sights zeroed.