Category Archives: Reviews

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GunVault Mini and Multi Deluxe safes.

Duncan Larsen submitted this article.

GunVault Mini and Multi Deluxe safes.

Having a firearm that is readily accessible and safely secure from unwanted access can be a challenge sometimes.   You must weigh the ease of access in an emergency, so you can deploy your firearm quickly against a threat, as well as the safety of others who you don’t want to have access to a firearm.  For years this was not too much of a concern for me.  I had a few firearms in my night stand drawer and I had no kids around the might want to snoop.  Times have changed and I needed to upgrade to a safer mode of protecting the access to the defensive firearms in the home.   I did a lot of research on what looked like it would work. I had seen a lot of the cheap, complicated, and hard to quickly access safes. I was getting discouraged on the options out there when I found the GunVault series of safes. I purchased the single handgun safe, the GunVault Mini Deluxe.

The GunVault Mini Deluxe has several key features that I want in a quick access safe.  It is very easy to use, has an internal light, is large enough for a full sized handgun with light and spare magazine.  The best feature is, the Deluxe model in these safes have both batteries and an external power adapter. Mine came with an AC wall adapter. This is key in case of power loss in the home and it also helps the batteries to last longer.  I have had this particular Mini Deluxe for three years and I just recently replaced the batteries.  The batteries still worked, but it is recommended they be replace yearly.  This safe has been used basically on a daily basis, opening and closing it repeatedly over the last three years. I have been very impressed with how it is holding up on daily use. The safe has a sixteen (16) steel gauge housing and weights about nine (9) lbs.  The inside is nicely, full foam padded. It is easy to know when one of the kids has messed with it as there is a tamper light to let you know when the wrong code has been used.

The GunVault Deluxe safes have a tamper proof spring loaded door.  When you punch in your code the door springs open quickly for fast access.  The door is very forceful when opening.  There are rubber stops in front of the door to avoid it slamming on to the surface the safe is on. The finger code pads are large within a handprint, have a positive feel and audible tone .  I have accessed the safe in the middle of the night, with just ambient light,  under stress with no problem. The safes also come with a key incase of total power loss.  This key is specific to the safe you have and will not open other GunVault safes.  The safes come with mounting gear and a mounting diagram for securing the safe to the floor or a night stand.  I prefer to place four (4) rubber pads on the corners of my safes instead of mounting them.  The rubber pads insure the safe does not slide on the surface it’s on.

I have been so impressed with the Mini Deluxe safe that I now have several located throughout my home.  I recently purchased the Multi Deluxe safe, basically it’s the same in quality and performance. It’s a lot larger, weighing about fourteen (14) lbs. The Multi Deluxe can handle several firearms and the gear you want to put in it.   I was able to easily place four full size handguns and spare magazines in the Multi Deluxe.

The GunVault safes have been very good safes for me, some for several years.  I feel they are a very great option for the person who needs quick access to a firearm but wants the peace of mind that the gun is secure until it is needed.  I also feel the GunVault’s fit the lifestyle of the armed processional or Concealed Carry civilian who access’s a firearm everyday and wants that firearm safely secured in a reliable safe. While I have not gone through every feature of the Deluxe models, for the price they are hard to beat.  If you look around they can be found at or under one hundred dollars.  GunVault also offers standard models and biometric finger print activated models. The standard safes being almost the same price, but without the key feature of an outside power adapter, are not worth it.  The Biometric models will cost you on average about one hundred dollars more.

Duncan.

Colt 901 Part 4

In parts 1-3 Shawn has pretty much covered most of I would say.

Previously, I owned an Armalite AR10 model 10A4F and I replaced that with a LMT MWS which I quickly got rid of.

The Armalite was about $1500, and was a nice rifle.  However with its 20 inch barrel, A2 stock, and longer then AR15 action, it make for a long almost awkward rifle.  While it did deliver its guaranteed 1.5 MOA, it was neither the handy battle rifle I would have liked, nor a semi-auto precision rifle.  So I replaced it with a LMT MWS.  The MWS had some very nice features, but I had some issues with mine, and sold it quickly.

Now having tried the Colt 901, I much prefer the Colt over the previous two rifles I owned.  The 901 is surprisingly soft shooting.  That’s not to say that it doesn’t have recoil, but that it is a smooth impulse.  Perhaps the M1 Garand might be a good comparison.  The Armalite I owned was not that pleasant to shoot, and the MWS, while nice, was still a much sharper recoil impulse.  When shooting the 901 off of a Harris bipod, the rifle recoils straight back, making it easy to watch my impacts through the NightForce 2.5-10×24 scope I was using.  When shooting offhand with an Aimpoint T1, the 901 recoiled smoothly up and back, I want to say that the recoil impulse is smoother than shooting a M4 with M855.  I don’t want to make some claim that the rifle has light recoil, but I find it extremely fun and easy to shoot.

I have noticed some people questioning the choice of the Vortex flash hider on the 901.  I know it to be an excellent choice.  16 inch barreled 308s have a good deal of flash and blast depending on ammunition used.  This pronged flash hider helped break up the flash and concussion from the shorter barrel, and makes the rifle much more pleasant for those around the shooter.  While a pronged flash hider will ring(most noticeable when dry firing), it is not noticed when firing the rifle.

The 901 is not light, but in my opinion, it balances well.  The Armalite rifle felt very nose heavy.  The MWS, while similar weight, had most of its weight in its barrel, making the rifle far more awkward then the 901.  The 901 handles very similarly to a MK18/CQBR with Daniel Defense RIS II and a suppressor.  It is not light, but it feels far closer to that of a M4 then the MWS.  I found the 901 easier to shoot well then the MWS.

On a side note, when I tried DAG surplus 308 in the LMT MWS, I could only get 6 inch groups at 100 yards with it.  It got to the point where people were making fun of me with my performance with that rifle.  This same ammo gives me 2.5 inch groups in the 901.  So far, in my limited testing, the 901 seems less ammo sensitive then the MWS.

I spent much of the time shooting the rifle with a Magpul CTR stock, the VLTOR IMOD that came with it works very nicely as well.

The Colt 901 is an awesome rifle, but it is not perfect.  So there are some things you should know before you buy one.

1.  The 901 uses a non-standard height front sight, so it comes with a Troy micro rear sight.  Standard AR15 rear BUIS will not work unless you use a rail mounted front sight on the monolithic top rail.

2.  The area where the trigger pins are on the lower is reinforced.  This means if you replaced the trigger, you will want to use the slightly longer trigger pins that come with the 901s trigger.

3.  5.56 PRI Gasbuster charging handles will not work with the 901 lower.  It is unknown if the BCM gasbusting Gunfighter charging handles will work.

4.  The 901 comes with “Colt Spec” .308 PMags.  These Colt Spec mags have an over insertion prevention tab on them.  I primarily ran the 901 with standard Magpul 308 Pmags and had no issues.  When using the standard PMags, think just like using standard GI mags in an AR15, push into the mag well, then pull to make sure it is seated.  The Colt Spec mags are nice, but not mandatory.  With the upper removed, I found it was a non-issue.

5.  The quad rail on the 901 is tall and narrow.  I think that rail panels might not be a good choice for this rifle, but it does work well with ladder covers.  I think that LaRue index clips were a little too slick for the 901.  A Knights handstop and VFGs work well on the 901, but are lower from the bore then I am used too.(I mainly use the Daniel Defense RIS II rail).

6.  The 901 is nose heavy, however it is not too different then a M4 with accessories, or a SBR with suppressor.  I find it better balanced then many of the other .308 variants I have owned or used.

Please don’t read this list the wrong way, I HIGHLY recommend the 901.  It is good to know these sort of things before you buy the rifle.

What I am looking forward to most is having an SBR 901.  I am excited about having a 308 upper, and a short 5.56 upper in the same case, with a single .30 cal can I could run on both uppers.

The COLT LE901 Part III Shooting and Handling

Since I have already written about the 901’s accuracy and long range precision, I wanted to talk about how the rifle handles, how it feels in recoil and in rapid fire and how it works out while wearing gear.

The first thing is how the gun feels in rapid-fire drills and “running and gunning.”  The 901 is in .308 winchester, a round that does not let you control the gun like a 5.56 will.  The carbine does not come with a muzzle brake, and a lot of people seem to worry it will be hard to control without real effort. The 901s recoil to me, feels very close to a light weight 6.8 carbine or a 7.62×39 AK with a underfolder stock. It is not bad at all.

As you can see in the action shot above. The recoil of the gun is very light for a 308. The gun is still on target while a case is in the air. My stance is not any kind of aggressive combat stance in that picture since I was shooting casually to see how easy the recoil would be.

After a little warm up with the 901 to see how it felt I started out with some triple and double tap drills at 20 yards with the weapon using my T-1 red dot.  During rapid fire I was able to keep the majority of the double and triple tap shots in the  CNS area.  Notice the shots in the face and high chest area of the target above.  All shots fired were full-power M80 ball surplus. The gun was very easy to control.  If I had slowed down, the shots would obviously tighten. I have to say, a vertical fore grip does give even more control and allows for some very rapid handling of the 901 and improves follow-up shots. This is not a real revelation but the VFG has fallen out of favor lately.  The slightly increased recoil of the 901, while not serious, does make a VFG handy.

Fast and easy reloading is accomplished just like any other AR.  Thanks to the ambi controls of the 901, this is sped up nicely. Ambi controls, while not something you have to have, are a nice feature.  Looserounds believes ambi controls are going to eventually be standard on every serious fighting rifle.

The 901 balances very well. A lot of people will complain about the gun weighing 9 pounds and more with gear added but the balance of the gun is so nice you do not notice the weight. I worked with the gun all day while shooting several times and never felt tired or like the gun was dragging me down.

Others who have shot it feel the gun is very controllable and balanced. Most have been surprised by how smooth the recoil of the carbine is.

The Colt is very fast to the shoulder form low ready making fast hits on multiple targets as slick as satan’s lawyer. The vortex flash hider tames the muzzle blast just like you expect the well-respected FH to do.

I tested the Colt while wearing my plate carrier to see how everything felt. I did not expect any surprises or let downs and I was right. The 901 is like any 556.

Firing the slayer while wearing plate carrier in non-standard and standard positions was typically easy and handling was slick.  I swapped out the factory stock for a Magpul CTR to see if a lighter stock made felt recoil more noticeable but I could tell no change.

The lower with 556 uppers used was also something with no surprises. After firing multiple surefire 60 round mags and a variety of other magazines through the upper/lower I found the gun had heated to the point gloves were needed. The T-1 mount was too hot to the touch yet the gun worked just like it was intended.

After high round count shooting and testing the rifle with normal drills, I took the gun  for a little urban use to see how it handled indoors in a more cramped situation. Even while wearing your gear and making way through small rooms and  hall ways, the 901 did great. The 308 round  is not a great choice for home defense if you are worried about over-penetration but it has appeal to a lot of people when it comes to knocking through some types of walls and structures in a more violent urban environment.


As of this writing I have over 2200 rounds through the 901. I did not clean it when I  got it and I did not clean it between shooting for groups.  I did not even put lube on the BCG until it burned away. In all that time not one malfunction appeared. The gun did not run sluggish or gritty. The only thing I noticed was the sludge from carbon and oil ruined my Tshirt. I have taken the gun apart and noticed very little wear on the parts you expect to see wear on. This is not a big deal because most quality ARs will hold up this well, but this is a new system not yet as proven as the M4 or M16 series so I think it is important to take note of how reliable it has been. Even though I have gotten it hot enough to feel through gloves. After leaving the  lower as dirty as it was, the 556 uppers were tested and ran like a swiss watch. Most of the ammo fired through the gun was federal gold medal and M80 ball with other match ammo brands used. The federal and M80 being the most used by far. The only ammo not tried yet was the cheaper Russian brands.

After all of the harsh firing schedule abuse I could manage, the rifle still shot well enough for “recce” or DMR work and not break a sweat.

The 901 is showing itself to be one of the truly most versatile Ar type rifles we have seen in a long time. It is not a dedicated sniper or CQB gun, but if used in those roles it can be employed effectively.

In the next parts there will be some reports on how it is doing with a wider variety of optics and ammo while in Florida heat and humidity while Loosrerounds testes it further and if we are lucky we will try it out on wild hogs. Fingers crossed we can pull off a successful hog hunt.

Testing The Colt LE901-16S Part II Accuracy Testing

Part two of my review of the Colt LE901 will be the results of  my shooting of the gun, its accuracy, performance and handling. I shot the rifle with all of the more popular match ammo and with handloads. I also took the gun out past what the company reasonably expected it to be fired at.  I expected the gun to perform well with its accuracy since it is in essence a larger 6940. The 6940 with its free floated barrel and unique barrel nut has been a very impressive performer.  The results still surprised me a little bit and shocked me with what it did at 1000 yards and beyond.

 

The 1st set up groups were shot using  168 grain federal match, M118LR, Black Hills 175 match. This was the first shooting from the gun after I got it. I placed a Leupold 18x target scope in larue mounts on the upper and got a rough zero then proceeded to shoot for groups.  The groups were shot at 100 yards on a calm day using  bipods and a small rear sandbag rest.  I considered this to be outstanding accuracy from a chrome-lined military 16 inch barrel. The 901 is pretty much a battle rifle, and to expect this accuracy from a battle rifle is not always reasonable. Some battle rifles will give good performance but  2-3 MOA is usually considered  fine for such weapons.

Above picture represents the rifle setup used for all accuracy testing.


The next set of  testing of accuracy was long range. I started out shooting the rifle with the common Federal Gold Medal 168 grain loading. I  used steel gongs at 600 yards the size of a man’s chest and a steel shaped groundhog.  With only 16 inches of barrel, velocity did fall off as expected causing me to need more adjustment on the optics compared to my normal 26-inch bolt-action. Some people seem to think shorter barrel means less accuracy but this is simply not true. You lose velocity but not accuracy. A quality barrel will always shoot and the shorter it gets, the stiffer it becomes and usually will gain a slight edge in accuracy with the shorter stiffness.

Posing beside the target for scale,the T-1 was not used for the 600 yards shot and was installed afterwards.

The groundhog target can be seen over the authors left shoulder. Hits were made easily once the scope was adjusted. Military ball ammo could be used to make repeated hits out to 600 yards though not with the reliability of the match ammo.

The next step tried with the 901 was 1000 yards. For this test I used the popular 168 grain load and my own handlaods of Berger 175 grain Berger VLD bullets with Varget.  I set up the target at 1000 yards and got to work. Because of no cant on the base or the upper I ran out of elevation on the optic. The optic was the Leupold 18x with a 1 inch tube. It is a target varmint scope and not suited to true long range work unless a canter base is used.  Not being able to zero and hold point of aim/point of impact, I had to hold off.  This made wind correction difficult.  It did not take long to become frustrated trying to determine hits on target with using hold off. So I settled on using the steel gong I used to get the rough zero at the distance by putting it a foot behind the paper target. In doing this, I was able to hear the steel ring when I was enough on paper to record a hit. With the wind blowing 8-12 MPH on the day trying to watch the dust from misses was not going to work. The gong behind the target worked well.

Because of the distance and the length of the barrel, the 168 grain load was a no go. I tried but the rounds just could not make it. The 168 has trouble staying super sonic even in a 26 inch barrel at 1000 yards, and in a 16 inch barrel, it was pointless though I did try. A lot of people seem to think the accurate 168 load is the standard but it simply is not. The 175 grain loadings for long range are better in every way and have been in use for sniping for years now in its M118LR form.

Once I fired at 1000 yards and saw the 901s performance I tried my luck at 1200 yards. So I moved back another 200 yards and tried again. The group at 1,200 may not seem like much, but in a carbine  not meant  for this work, it is impressive.  The groups are marked in the picture circled in different color to indicate which groups was shot at the different distances. Blue for 1000 yards and green for 1,200.   The 1000 yard groups does not seem as impressive as it really is at first glance. Wind was catching me and taking the shots off to the left. Since I could not see the hits I used the same hold through the whole string of shots, but if you move the holes over to the right, you will see the most of them would have fallen in the bad guys chest and would have been lethal. The position of the group is my fault , not the fault of the rifle. The 1,200 yard group is better than at first seems as well. It may not be sniping precision but it is enough to make hits at the range or at least provide effective covering fire.  It is surely good enough to disable a vehicle form the distance, or any other machine that needs stopped, or even to direct fire for a machine gun team? Who knows, the possibilities are what you make them.

After this testing I shot the rifle in the usual fashion using tactical drills and IDPA target, Q targets, clay pigeons and steel gongs. Most of this general purpose was done with ball ammo and some match thrown in. After over 1,200 rounds at that point I had not cleaned or lubed the 901. It worked as flawless as it did when I took it out of the box. At times I heated the gun up so much I needed gloves to continue to fire it and even the mount that held the T-1 to the upper was too hot to the touch for bare skin. At no point did the gun have a problem or feel sluggish.  After totaling up those rounds fired with no cleaning I decided to test its accuracy again.  I would test it dirty and if it did not do well I would clean the barrel and try again, showing the effect of fowling if it was drastic.

I used the same optics and mounts as before but for the next test I used a dedicated Benchrest competition style front rest that weighs about 35 pounds, with a sandbag on the rest and a rear bag.  To get all I could from the gun I concentrated and used all my effort to shot the best groups I could. Most groups took longer then 10 minutes for 5 rounds. It is hard work to shoot small groups and total effort when using a milspec trigger and a semi auto. Shooting a semi auto is a different animal then shooting small groups off a bench with a dedicated bolt gun with a target stock and has different needs you have to be aware of.

This set of targets were shot first while the gun was dirty with over 1200 rounds of fouling. I decided there was no need to clean after getting these result.  They are slightly better then the original test for accuracy so I felt cleaning would not help or hurt much. If anything the gun shot slightly better, perhaps do to some break in. After years of experience I have come to the conclusion that barrel break-in is a waste of time.  I can not think of any good reason why the gun did better and I surely never used the conventional “wisdom” of 1 shot, clean, repeat etc etc.

The 10 rounds group of Black Hills 175 grain was shot last and is very impressive to me. I have seen few factory bolt guns that would shoot this well and I do not recall ever seeing a factory M1A or M14 that would do as well.

Here is a picture of all the groups side by side.

The gun now has close to 2000 rounds though it still with no cleaning. I am able to make head shots out to 300 yards with it and stay within the CNS or “A” zone of the badguy targets if the wind is not too bad and I do my part.  If not, head shots are still easy.  I have lubed the BCG since it was bone dry, and have created a nice black slurry that has not done anything negative except ruin my t-shirts.

In Part 3 I will talk about shooting the gun in a more “run and gun”manner, how it feels, what the recoil is like and how I set it up for comfort and shooting it wearing gear.

ARMS 41

The ARMS 41 is a clamp on flip up sight for the AR15.  It is available with and without a bayonet lug.

Installation is easy.  ARMS also includes a spacer in case you are not using a standard handguard.  When up, the 41 has the same profile as an standard fixed front sight base.  To fold it down, you push down on the angled support next to the front sight post.  It uses standard AR15/M16 front sight posts, so you can insert a match or night sight.

The finish is a light grey.  While I have read reports online of people having the finish wear off quickly, I had no such issues with mine.  While there are reasons why ARMS is not popular, the ARMS 41 is a solid product.

The COLT LE901-16S A DETAILED LOOK PART I

Everyone knows Colt.  Colt started a little over 175 years ago and is now one of our country’s oldest gun makers. In the 1960s, Colt secured the rights to the Stoner/Armalite AR15 and AR10.  Back in ’09 Colt introduced the LE6940 to the market as the first major change to the family since the intro to the wildy successful and popular M4 carbine we see everywhere today.  The 6940 had a lot of parts in common with the M4 (known as the 6920 in semi-auto dress). The major difference was the new upper.  The  6940 upper is monolithic and free floats the barrel.  The receiver and the rail of the ’40 are all machined from a one-piece forging and offers the ability to set optics anywhere on the rail and have total stability.  This helps to keeps your zero, well, zeroed.  Another addition was the folding front sight that replaced the fixed military legacy front sight base that dates back to the originals.

Right or wrong, a desire for more power than the 5.56 arose over the last decade because of the GWOT and because our soldiers are sometimes involved in long range contacts.  The tired old M14 was pressed into service in hopes of extending the range of SDMs and to give a little more confidence to those who felt the 5.56 was not quite enough.  In the years since, a lot of companies have started to ramp up and offer their own versions of the AR-series in 30 caliber and anything else they can squeeze into the magazine well of the rifle pattern.  The Armalite AR10 has been around for a while, the KAC was adopted as a sniper weapon by both the US Army and the USMC, and the LMT MWS has seen limited success as a DM rifle for the British military.

It is in the midst of this 30 caliber revolution that people noticed one name oddly absent from the 7.62 AR market game–Colt.  The company had not forgotten or ignored the trend, but it had to make sure to fill contracts worth millions for the US Gov, including the M4 and recent awards for M240 machine guns.  Now that the war seems to be winding down and Colt has more breathing room, they’re expanding and are stating to fire up their impressive R&D again.  Remember that this is a company that has brought out some of the most legendary firearms of the past 175 years.  After the release of the 6940, rumors started about a version chambered in 308 all over the internet with some links to patents to support the rumors.  Then over a year ago at the SHOT show we saw the 901 for the first time. It was shown in several different barrel lengths and finishes.  Now over a year later the 901 is ready to  hit the market.

What makes the Colt LE901 special is not only is it a 308 rifle, but it can be very easily converted to take any milspec 5.56 upper available and made to quality. Colt considers this their “Modular carbine” and it most certainly is.

With a adapter block (which is installed very easily), the modular ambi lower will take any upper you can find.  One extra part and a swap of the buffer spring and buffer give you unlimited combos with the 901.   The rifle takes the SR25 pattern magazines so it will take the Pmag, (and therefore the KAC and LaRue mags as well).  The barrel is 16 inches long and the button-rifled barrel and chamber are chrome-lined.  As with all Colts, the barrel is MPC and proofed–not just in batches, but every single one of them.  The twist rate of the gun is 1/12 which gives you a pretty wide range of bullet weights to use.

Like the 6940 the  901 has a monolithic upper.  It also has a few upgrades the 6940 does not have. The rail of the 901 has QD sockets not just in the front of the rail, but also in the rear of the rail.  Most people want this and it is great to see this added to the rifle. The front sight is like the 6940’s in that it folds, but the difference is that the 901’s front folding sight is not lockable in the up position for those who worry it might fold down in harsh use right when you do not want it to.

As written above, the lower of the rifle is also ambi.  This is another trend that has started in the last decade and one that will be sticking with us in my opinion. The controls are well placed and easy to use.  None of them are stiff or require so much force as to make them useless.  The gun comes standard with a Colt marked troy BUIS.

A nice feature in the lower is the absence of a web blocking the installation of a RDIAS. So if you have one, full auto fire in a colt 308 can be a reality. The FCG parts are all standard Milspec with all the typical colt quality and testing that goes with that. The 308 marked buffer in the gun can be seen in the picture above.

The 16 inch barrel is described by colt as a HBAR but I would call it more of a medium heavy with a straight taper unlike the taper of older colt HBAR carbines of the past. The rail comes off like the 6940 by depressing the lock on the bottom rear with a round or punch. The rifle sent to me by colt defense also needs a screw on each side of the rail taken out for further stripping.  This helps keep the rail from moving at all for  reliability when using IR lasers or other force multipliers.

The bolt carrier group comes apart just like any other AR but with a few slight upgrades. The firing pin has the addition of a firing pin spring that colt advises not to remove.  The gas rings on the bolt are also one-piece instead of three rings like the 5.56 bolt.

The rest of the BCG is  no surprise. It is made to the same standards as any colt rifle meant for hard combat use with everything tested to milspec and Colt’s TDP that has served millions of military, LEO and civilian personnel for years.

The conversion kit that lets you use the 5.56 upper of your choice comes in three parts. The adapter magazine well block, the 556 buffer spring and the standard Milspec  M4  “H” buffer.  It takes less than a minute to convert the rifle over to 556 and having it operate just like your favorite 556 slayer.  Some people are already saying to use the 308 buffer for a softer shooting carbine but this is a bad idea and I will go out on a limb and say if something goes wrong with your rifle in this configuration of 556 with 30 buffer parts, Colt may not warranty it.  That is PURE SPECULATION on my part, but we all know how companies view such things.

The 901 receiver extension or “buffer tube” as it is commonly called, is standard M4 all the way with the normal colt 4 position. In the picture above is the 308 buffer inside its spring on the left with the 556 buffer to the far right. The 5.56 spring is far left next to the block.

The upper can be tilted down for removal of the BCG and cleaning without taking the entire gun apart. If you’re in a hurry, it’s the way to go although it’s easy to remove the upper completely with the block still on the upper.  The pin is captured so there is no fear of losing it.

Picture shows 556 upper opened as far as it will go with block installed and attached to the lower.

A few people have voiced concerns over what mags the lower with adapter block may or may not take. I found every mag tested will work, including uncommon mags.

Above is a pre-ban colt upper in 7.62×39 with a  ’39 mag in the well. The gun runs flawlessly with the commie caliber upper and magazine fit.

Here is a 6940 upper with the surefire 60 round magazine showing off its stuff and working perfectly.

The world standard 6920 ( M4) upper and the beloved 5.56 Pmag in the 901 lower and working 100 percent.

Finally the Colt  HBAR ELITE  CR6724 24 inch barreled precision upper takes a turn on the lower. All uppers ran as expected with no trouble.

In part two I will write about shooting the 901, its recoil, accuracy and how it does out to 1000 yards along with pictures of targets in testing.

The Colt LE901 A Look at the Parts

I got a few pictures of the BCG  stripped to show the differences in the parts and the size compared to a 5.56 and other  308 pattern rifles.

The BCG stripped for cleaning. The firing pin retaining pin slot has a very nice recessed slot to protect it.

Firing pin and firing pin spring. Colt says DO NOT remove firing pin spring from the firing pin.

901 bolt with firing pin.   You can not tell from this picture but the gas ring on the bolt is one piece.

Front view of the bolt face. Notice how thick and strong the lugs are. This is a heavy duty  part and shouts QUALITY.  Just like all Colt rifles, the bolt is MP inspected, proof fired and hardened. Not in batches, but every one.

The inside of the carrier still looks clean even after 500 rounds fired with no cleaning or lube.

Massive cam pin.

Here is the charging handle. Notice the ridge, or lip on the bottom rear.

A look up into the upper receiver. If you look close you can see the part added for piston conversion on later models.

Check back for more testing of the 901’s accuracy out to 1000 yards coming up.

Colt LE901 1st Impressions

Loose rounds was sent  the new modular 308 rifle from our friends over at Colt Defense today.  This is the new gun that has a 308 upper and a lower that can take a 5.56 upper to with a slight addition of an adapter block.  I got the gun and did a few groups with it and took some pics to get them up for everyone to see. Much much more to follow in the weeks to come!!

I set it up for the groups using a Leupold in Larue mounts. Shot at 100 yards with match ammo.

A lot more to come. I will be running it pretty hard and shooting it out to 1000 yards. More if I can pull it off. But this is a hint of things to come.

and yes, the 901 will take a bayonet

Woolrich Elite Pants

There are a lot of options for pants today and I know everyone rolls their eyes over the thought of “tactical pants”  and I can understand that. But, Woolrich Elite  has a really nice line of pants for range use or CCW use or just whatever you want to use them for. One thing I like about them  is how soft and comfortable they are.  They are tough and made for heavy use like some of the other brands, but the difference is, I can wear these no matter how hot it is outside. They breath and let you move around in them easily.

The pants I have came to me from my girlfriend buying them for me for christmas.  They are the light weight operators pants in the line.  I had always saw the woolrich elite line and admired them but did not know how nice they were until I had them.

Th pants seem to be a standard BDU type of pants at first glance but they are far from it. They have around ten pockets and none of them  useless pockets. My favorite is the rear pockets. One will hold your wallet very secure on the inside of a larger pocket that you could fit your mother in law in if you wanted to do something so stupid. And you get this feature on the left and right rear pocket. The front two hip pockets are deep enough to hold everything you want as well.

The two side cargo pockets are deep and will expand to hold a metric ton. They have the shock cord drawstring seen on a lot of pants these days  like the ACU uniform pants.  The inside of these pockets had a very neat feature. Inside each thigh cargo pocket is  elastic bands that will hold and secure anything you need. They will easily secure  mags for the M16 series of weapons.

At the knees is another welcome touch. The pants have a  pocket to hold knee pads. you can put in the military foam pads or the thicker rubber type like 5.11 offers.  Having even the thin foam pads is nice. You dont have the extra weight or heat but you do have some protection against falling off of you big wheel. It has saved me a skinned knee for sure.

The Pants have the now common ankle pockets on each leg too. Both will hold a small IFAK or  a AR15 magazine and are velcro closed. The outside has elastic bans t hold things, woolrich says they will hold chem lights . I tried it and they will. I am not really sure what else you could put in there but I never was clever with thinking up something useful.

I love there pants and I do not mind telling anyone.  They are worth every penny. They look good for any used short of a tuxedo and they feel great. Mine are ta, but Woolrich offers them in more then one color of course.  The belt loops take a large variety and the cuffs do not have a drawstring so if you need to tie them off on the bottom i do not know what to tell you.  I would not let that stop me from buying a great pair of pants though. I have been wearing and using them 2 years and they still look new.

BCM Gunfighter Charging Handle

Duncan Larsen AKA FailureDrill-P099 submitted this article.

 

Recently I was asked if I would do a review of two Bravo Company Manufacturing (BCM) Gunfighter charging handles for looserounds.com. This all came about after having numerous conversations with Shawn Thompson. We recently discussed the BCM Mod 4 medium Gunfighter charging handle. I have been using the BCM Mod 5 small charging handle for several years now and had recently purchase a BCM Mod 4. Shawn said he had used the BCM Mod 3 large charging handle and found it too large causing it to hang up on his gear.

Top View
Side View

I originally purchased the BCM Mod 5 because I did not want a latch that might dig into me or my gear. I had a lot of experience with the Badger Ordinance Gen1 square latch years ago when I was a police officer and patrol rifle instructor. I remembered during several rifle instructor courses, training days and SWAT trainings how the Badger latch would hang up on gear and dig into you hard. When purchasing one of the three sizes of the BCM Gunfighter I did not what a charging handle that was going to be overly large. The smooth profile of the BCM Mod 5 charging handle appealed to me.

Grip on standard AR-15 charging handle
Grip on BCM Mod 5 charging handle

The BCM Mod 5 has been great. The BCM Mod 5 latch is slightly larger than a standard AR15/M16 charging handle latch. I have always used my support hand, with my index finger and thumb to work the charging handle. The BCM Mod 5 gave me just a little more grip surface over the standard latch. For someone who really wants an as close to standard size latch with just a little more surface area to grab, the BCM Mod 5 might be for you. With the BCM Mod 5 you will not have to worry about it hanging up on gear or digging into you. But, when I think about why I purchase the BCM Mod 5, it was because I had a hangover from that huge Badger Ordinance latch. I was being hyper sensitive about a charging handle that was going to hang up and dig into me as I was moving or transitioning to a sidearm.

Top view of the BCM Mod 5 charging handle
BCM Mod 5 (top)
BCM Mod 4 (bottom)
BCM Mod 5 (left)
BCM Mod 4 (right)

With my next charging handle purchase I decided I needed to give the BCM Mod 4 a try. Wow I sure am glad I did. I was surprised to see it was just slightly larger than the BCM Mod 5. For as large as it looks it still does not dig into my chest or hang up on my gear as bad as other latches. I won’t say that it’s not going to hang up on some gear, but I find it is not as frequent. I think part of this is due to the angle of the latch. As far as function, for me it is the same as the BCM Mod 5, with the technique I use. As it is slightly larger you get that peace of mind of a firm grasp of the latch. For someone who uses the blade of the support hand to charge the handle it is superior. You can fully charge the handle aggressively with or without gloves. I would suggest gloves if you are training hard. The smaller BCM Mod 5 just is not up to the blade of the hand charging. I just can’t get a good, full, aggressive charge on the BCM Mod 5 with the blade of the hand technique.

Using the thumb and forefinger to work the BCM Mod 4
Using the palm to work the BCM Mod 4

Now that I have run both of the BCM Gunfighters for a while I find the BCM Mod 4 is my personal favorite. Both BCM Gunfighters will serve you well but, the BCM Mod 4 holds a slight advantage over the BCM Mod 5 for positive aggressive use. If you are going to spend the money on a BCM Gunfighter for a patrol, entry team or home defense rifle, I would go with the BCM Mod 4. Your just getting more bang for the buck. Either way a BCM Gunfighter charging handle is a must have piece of gear for a serious fighting rifle .

Duncan Larsen.