Category Archives: Scattered Shots

An aside.

Four-Feet

I have done mostly what most men do,
And pushed it out of my mind;
But I can’t forget, if I wanted to,
Four-Feet trotting behind.

Day after day, the whole day through —
Wherever my road inclined —
Four-feet said, “I am coming with you!”
And trotted along behind.

Now I must go by some other round, —
Which I shall never find —
Somewhere that does not carry the sound
Of Four-Feet trotting behind.

Rudyard Kipling

Carrying is a great responsibility, live up to the challenge.

Duncan Larsen AKA FailureDrill-P099 submitted this article.

Carrying is a great responsibility, live up to the challenge.

During times of great tragedy there is an opportunity to reflect on yourself as a Concealed Carry Weapon (CCW) holder or off Duty Law Enforcement Officer (LEO).  CCW is not just anyone carrying a firearm, it is a state of mind.  You must think about scenarios that might occur around you.  Whether you are an off duty LEO or a private citizen CCW holder, you must mentally prepare for an active shooter scenario.  When I was a LEO, I always carried off duty.  I was not required to do so but I made the decision that I could not live with myself if something happened and I was not armed.  As a CCW holder this has also stayed with me.   Even though you might carry everyday in your own personal capacity, you must ask yourself, am I ready to use deadly force?

I remember as a young officer having a recurrent dream.  This dream was the same for a long time.  I would get into a deadly force encounter and draw my firearm.  I would fire several rounds at my attacker but they would have no effect. The guy would just keep coming at me.  I found later that other officers had this same dream.  When I became a firearms instructor, the head of the firearms division advised me to read two books.  These books were On Killing and On Combat, both by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.   These books talked a-lot about mental preparation for armed conflict.  In fact I found that the books contained officers talking about the same ongoing dream I had.   This dream let you know that you were subconsciously not mentally or physically prepared for a deadly force encounter.  The solution for this preparation is more realistic training with your duty weapon, off duty weapon or CCW weapon. Training over and over builds muscle memory and things  become second nature.  There is a reason officers cannot remember the exact number of rounds they fired in a deadly force encounter.  Their subconscious took over from their thousands of hours of training and they reacted.  They stopped the threat and did not realize it until it was over. Their reaction became second nature.

As a private CCW holder nothing is different.  You must train, you must think about the what if’s and you must make the decision that you will use deadly force when needed.  If you do not challenge yourself mentally and physically you will fail, you will freeze up when it counts.  At the end of the day you must ask yourself, do I want to be a sheep or do I want to be a sheep dog?

Several years ago there was a shooting in Trolley Square, a popular shopping mall in Salt Lake City Utah.  An off duty officer from Ogden City Police Department was having dinner with his wife in Trolley Square. This day he was carrying an off duty weapon, when a young man came in to the mall and started shooting people.  The attacker killed several men, women and children.  The officer was prepared and ran towards the gunfire.  He engaged the attacker with the only magazine of ammunition he had.  These  rounds pinned the attacker in a shop until officers from SLC SWAT engaged and killed the suspect in a firefight.  How many lives were saved? Who knows, but the officer stopped the suspect from killing anyone else because he was prepared mentally as well as physically.  That day he was just a CCW holder, just like you, and lives were saved.  If you are going to carry your firearm, commit to it mentally and physically.

Duncan

Looserounds is on Facebook

If you like looserounds and you have a facebook account ( who doesn’t ?) go on over to the looserounds facebook page and like us. You can see new pictures and some extra content that is not on the LR website. See cool pictures of gear and links to other places to help you enter contests and get great deals on gear and firearms.  You can share your thoughts , pictures of your guns and gear and ask questions  directly to the LR staff.   It is growing every day and it beats  your sister in law blathering on  about her baby shower or trying to find out how many of your high school  friends got fat !!

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Range Report: S&W M&P15 QC

The S&W M&P15 has become very popular due to its low cost and availability.  My personal experience with owning one was that my M&P15R had an incorrectly cut upper that would not hold the ejection port door closed, the stock was not installed correctly and was crooked, and the fire control group was defective and would double.  S&W replaced the lower on my rifle, and I did not bother to have them work on the upper.

Often at the range I have seen people have minor issues with M&P15s.  The new low cost model (around $700) came with a near useless rear sight.  This cheap copy of the detachable carry handle often would not index correctly.  Last Sunday, I saw this issue.  This new, out of the box, M&P15 came with a broken bolt catch.  While I have no doubt that S&W will fix this, I have been less then impressed by S&W quality control on their rifles.

The USMC M40 Sniper

The USMC decided to replace the Winchester model 70/Unertl combination  in late 1965  due to the recent changes to the M70 from the  pre 64  version and for a lighter  rifle scope combo that made quick first round  hits easier.  The MTU was tasked with coming up with a rifle suitable for the Corps needs for the new sniper program. The MTU conducted tests comparing COTS rifles and  scopes  currently on the market in December 1965 and January  1966. The testing concluded that the Remington 700- 40x target rifle and the Redfield accu-range 3x-9x  rifle scope the best  choice for standard sniping issue at the time.

The urgency for the testing resulted in only COTS rifles and optics to be tested by the MTU.  Due to the  pressure for a fast decision, the MTU worked with the following self imposed assumptions.

The cartridge used would be the the 7.62 NATO.

Most shots would be made at 600 yards or closer.

The scope would be adjustable  to 1000 yards

The rifle/scope should be capable of  2 MOA

The combo should be simple and robust and easily trainable.

After the MTU  finished the report they recommended that the rifle used be the remington m700-40x. The stock have a dull oil finish. Swivels be military type non removable. The rifle finish to be dull non=glare. The rifle barrel should be 1/10 inch twist, free floating and the action be clip slotted. The USMC wanted a 308 caliber rifle with a medium heavy barrel in a sporter stock and remington company made every effort to give them exactly that,

On April 7th 1966 the remington M700 with redfield scope was adopted for sniping use in south east asia. The USMC stated that nothing about the rifle was unique, just the right combination of parts.

The rifle was planned to be in service by June of 1966. the rifle had a expected service life of 10 years and was to manufactured entirely by remington which would furnish all support equipment for the rifle including optics, carry case and ammo.

The amount of M40 rifles produced by remington for the USMC by year is as follows:

1966/700 rifles

1967/62 rifles

1968/87 rifles

1969/137 rifles

1970/8 rifles

1971/ 1 rifle

By 1973 according to official documents, there was only 425 total density of M40 rifles still in service by the USMC.

The M40 was issued to be used with the Lake City M118 special ball match ammo. the USMC was the fist to use specialized match ammo dedicated for sniper use and the US Army followed.

The rifle was well liked upon first issue by personnel in the sniping and marksmanship community. Reports of the rifle easily shooting 2 MOA from bags with match ammo were normal.  Some problems with the redfield scope had already started to surface however, with complaints that it was not easy to adjust for range, would loose focus if turned to 9x and  the range finder in the scope would melt if the sun  was directly on the objective. The rifle can be uncomfortable during recoil with its light weight and metal butt plate. Marine sniper school students often used rubber shower shoes under their Tshirts during practice to damped the recoil and cut down on the pain.

The rifle was sent to Vietnam and was issued to scout snipers  who loved it early on.  A number of  famous snipers used the M40 to great affect. Chuck Mawhinney made his record 109 kills  using the M40 for most of his time and Carlos Hathcock using a M40 for his 2nd tour.

After  being issued and seeing service, the problems with the rifle/scope started to show. The rifle, nor the optic were meant for the tropical climate of asia or combat use but did preform well over all. The problems normal for the rifle was  the stock warping and putting pressure on the barrel, rust, the scope fogging and the ranging scale melting in the sun. To help the situation Marine RTE armorers were assigned to take care of the rifles and optics while the sniper were responsible for standard PM.  The rifle were soon found that they needed to be glass bedded often. The barrel channel had to be constantly check and rasped to keep the barrel free floated and the stock water proofed.  The trigger needed to be checked along with the action. Lube was needed often as it was with everything in asia and special “hot lockers” were made by the RTE personnel to dry out the scopes over night after operations to make sure they did not fog up when needed.

RTE personnel soon traveled to keep a check on the rifles and help keep them working. It was found not all losses were combat related. Sometimes a rifle could be out of action just from a ride in a truck. Most being out of action due to scope failure. Most scopes would be out of focus over 8x so the snipers learned to  focus only as high as 7x or 8x. Another problem was the optics would sometimes freeze in place if left at one power setting too long.  Eventually the snipers learned to watch the optics and glass bedding was authorized for the M40. The stock would warp so badly with  the un bedded actions that armorers would take the gun apart and find the action screws tightened so tight that they would not be making contact to the stock from warping and shrinking in the heat. Once glass bedding was OK to do the barrel was floated with 1/8 inch space between barrel and stock and waterproofed. Much of the problems were controlled with careful PM and use.

After most of the problems were understood the general attitude for the M40 was that accuracy was fine and the gun worked as meant and did well. Most liked it fine and felt the gun was almost the equal of the M70 used by earlier Marines. Few had the time and experience to have used both for sniping during the course of the war but Carlos Hathcock who did have the chance  thought the M70 better at the time but liked one as well as the other.

After the war the M40 was retained as sniper standard for the USMC and upgrades were made to the original rifle. Improvements included at SS match barrel, a Mcmillian fiberglass stock with a woodland camo patter and a 10x Unertl scope to name a few. The rifle was renamed the M40a1 and has remained in service now in the M40A5 form.

The gun used in the pictures in the remington 2006 scout sniper association re issue. A limited number were made to the same specs as the original. The gun came with a letter ot authenticity from Iron Brigade Armory who helped make sure it was correct. IBA has long been THE source for USMC sniper history.  The rifle came correct with the oil finished walnut stock, metal butt plate, barrel parkerized with matching receiver finish. The action is the remington 40x action that has been clipped slotted for stripper clips and has the left side drilled and tapped for rear peep sights. The serial number begins with the SSA ( scout sniper association ) prefix and has the correct U.S. stamped above it.

Standing in for the original redfield accur-range USMC contract scope is a modern redfeild painted green to resemble the original which is very hard to find. The original M40 came with the original redfield JR bases and rings along with the scope.  Badger arms made a limited run of these bases and rings for the M40 limited re issue and Leupold has a small run of green finished 3x-9x scopes for the same rifle. Neither was completely correct in make or type but was close enough for most wanting a clone or the original and a considerable amount cheaper.

Above is a picture of the original SHOT SHOW remington flyer for the M40 signed by 3 famous Vietnam USMC snipers  and members of the SSA, one being the president at the time, for the author. To the left is the gold scout sniper challenge coin that came with the rifle depicting a USMC sniper in the setting position with a winchester M70/Unertl.

The remington M40 re issue is a nice  rifle and a piece of history. They made a very small run  but if you are interested in sniping history  or the history of the M40 in USMC service it is worth your time to track one down. In 2006 the rifle was around 1100 dollars but would be higher today as everything is. But its a fast way to get started on a sniper rifle collection.