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U.S. ARMY SELECTS TRUE VELOCITY COMPOSITE-CASED AMMUNITION FOR NGSW PROGRAM

GARLAND, TX – True Velocity composite-cased ammunition has been selected for the U.S. Army’s Next Generation Squad Weapon (NGSW) modernization program. True Velocity’s 6.8mm composite-cased cartridge was submitted as part of an overall NGSW weapon system in partnership with General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems and firearm manufacturer Beretta Defense Technologies.
True Velocity’s proprietary 6.8mm case design will provide end users with significant logistical and operational advantages over traditional brass-cased ammunition, including substantially increased effective range and muzzle energy, drastic reduction in cartridge weight and enhanced accuracy. The combination of True Velocity’s ammunition with the General Dynamics OTS weapon submission results in a state-of-the-art weapon system capable of long-range lethality, short recoil impulse, significant ballistic improvements and enhanced operational effectiveness for the soldier.
“True Velocity’s 6.8mm composite case design produces a level of performance, consistency and efficiency never before seen in small arms ammunition,” said Chris Tedford, president and chief operating officer for True Velocity. “Combining True Velocity’s innovation and technology with the expertise of General Dynamics OTS and Beretta results in a weapon system solution that exceeds NGSW requirements and provides the U.S. Army with a definitive edge on the field of battle.”

https://www.truevelocityinc.com/media-center/us-army-selection-for-ngsw/

Hmm…

I worry that some Army higher ups are trying to fix deficiencies in Soldier shooting performance by adopting a magic new gun & round.

That said, there is plenty can can be improved. Lighter ammo lets you carry more, higher velocity gives you all sorts of performance benefits. There is concern that the Army wants to go to a round that is so much higher pressure that it will be less safe and less reliable.

Let’s see how this works out.

Kentucky Squirrel Hunting IV

I went out for a quick two hours of hunting yesterday evening since the weather was much cooler.

I made my way back to another mountain where beech trees are every where. It’s a little early for beechnuts but the squirrels still hang out on this slope when the wind blows a bit more than they like. It paid off because I was able to get three in one tree.

All three were in one of those center trees chasing each other playing around. With some quick shotgun work I was able to get all three. Unfortunately for me two of them fell and rolled down the mountain into the biggest bunch of thorn bushes and blackberry bushes you will ever see. I spent 40 minutes fighting through it trying to recover the game and had to give it up as it got too dark to see safely. Very frustrating and leaves me with a sick feeling.

This young male was the only one of the three I could find. Sometimes you lose even when you win. Sad Panda face.

One thing to keep an eye our for this time of year is the one thing I hate above all things.

Looking at this, some people will think it’s harmless. Others with more sense will see those spikey hairs and know immediately that is never an indication of something to cuddle with. It is the White Tussock Moth Caterpillar. They love to fall out of trees and onto your head, arms or back of the neck. When they feel threatened, or maybe they just do it to be pricks, they shed all those hundreds of tiny white hairs. And where those hairs touch the skin… Pain. Pain, stinging and burning. A rash that itches and stings for what seems like a week. Imagine bees stings that itch intensely. When I was in high school one fell on my left upper arm. The hairs are so fine they even stung me through the long sleeve shirt fabric. I couldn’t take off the shirt without making it worse so I had to take out my knife and cut the sleeve off. One about 10 years later fell on back of my brother’s neck. I can’t imagine that hell. This is why it pays to wear a hat like a boonie hat int he woods. Other than the protection from sun and rain, it does well in keeping stinging insects off the neck when they fall from a tree or are knocked from leaves if you shake a tree passing by.

One of the major problems in the south is the asian Kudzu vine. Another import that turned out to not be such a great idea. It’s nearly unstoppable without a major amount of work, fire ,chemicals and digging. IT will cover a multiple story house if not stopped. It will go up power lines, road signs and trees. Once over trees it kills them eventually. No sun can get through.

It doesn’t do well in shade thankfully. So it doesn’t grow under the treeline. So what it does is climb up the trees on the edge of a open area. It will eventually kill them all and as they fall, it will move and cover the area no exposed to more sun. That mass on the far left used to be one of the biggest pine trees I ever saw. It was beautiful and when I was a kid I would often play under it. None of that vine was there even 20 years ago. The vine grows what seems like 6 inches a night once summer hits.

It does have one tiny use. This time of year it blooms a purple flower that smells exactly like grape Koolaide or grape jelly. It is edible and you can make a jam out of it. You can even eat it raw and it tastes a bit like grape Not as much as it smells like grape though. Weird.

The vine can be made into a type of bread if you are dedicated enough or starving. I haven’t tried that though. Whitetail deer love to eat the leaves from the vine and all summer and late fall you can see them every where grazing on it. Once it frosts though, the deer won’t touch it. Even if it is only slightly wilted.

Walking through it is not fun but it is doable, I have learned to love with it after all these years. What other choice do you really have?

Robert Mugabe Finally Dead

“Liberator” of Rhodesia, communist dictator, torturer and all around scum bag finally assumed room temp a short time ago. Leftists the world over mourn the loss of one of their idols.

Visiting dignitaries were given gifts of his portrait, and rightfully so: To many Zimbabweans, Robert Mugabe, the strongman who ruled the South African nation for 30 years until he was ousted in a bloodless coup two years ago, was a complex figure. He was a symbol of liberation and hope – a leader of the quasi-Communist ZANU-PF who helped free his country from oppressive British rule, according to the NYT.

Mugabe was 95 at the time of his death.

Later, when food stocks started to run low, Mugabe’s true nature became apparent. He authorized oppressive crackdowns and indefinite detentions of suspected political opponents. Some suspected him of torture and unspeakable treatment of suspected political opponents.

But Mugabe wasn’t alone in this. Many in his generation of African revolutionary political leaders believed that, since they had freed the country from colonial rule, it was theirs to govern – as Mugabe put it – “until God says ‘come.'”

And he almost made it. In November 2017, army officers, fearing that Mugabe would anoint his second wife, Grace Mugabe (some 40 years his junior), as his political heir, moved against him. Within a dramatic few days he was placed under house arrest and forced by his political party, ZANU-PF, to step down.

So, all that happened is a man who helped ruin a prospering country with the approval and often help of the western world, has went tango uniform. And of course mind warpingly, the people in former Rhodesia who aren’t dead from starvation (or busy raping and killing the undesirable population left from Rhodesia just for being a certain demographic) will no doubt be mourning him. We will be having a coca-cola in a small quiet celebration for what it’s worth.

Kentucky Squirrel Hunting III

Yesterday evening it was blisteringly hot. But I really wanted to get some hunting in. I waited till about 2 hours before dark to cut down on the heat. Since this left me little time I had to move at jogging speed to the top of the mountain in about 20 minutes. Boy do I feel it today. Isn’t that view worth it though?

I didn’t have much luck though. It was just too hot, The squirrel either fed early before daylight or after dark to avoid the heat. They don’t like it anymore than people. I did see one off in the distance but couldn’t get to him. This was between us.

When I was younger I would have risked climbing over that. Not now though. Not only do you risk broken legs or ankles, but the local timber rattles. Just not worth it anymore. Instead I ate all the pawpaw fruits off of all those pawpaw trees you see in the picture. I can’t help myself.

Speaking of snakes and broken ankles.

This is something you will commonly see in the mountains around here. The ridges or fingers will have sections like this on top. Climbing these are as risky as climbing loose rocks every where else in the world. The risk of snakes in the hottest days of August and September is pretty high around these. The upside is, when the dead leaves are on the ground and you are trying to be quiet, being able to step on rocks and not leaves is a godsend.

Another useful hint is using deer paths that run in the direction you are stalking towards.

This year the deer population has exploded. You can tell this trail looks like something in a public park. They run them like a highway with just as much traffic and they are all over the place. I have never seen so much deer activity in my life in the area. It’s making the idea of deer hunting this year tempting.

About moving in the woods while hunting. A few tips for those of you who might be Big City Intellectuals who have no experience or maybe some one thinking about starting. Whatever gun you use. Don’t walk around at low ready like you are patrolling the Mekong Delta or Helmund Province. Carry the gun at its center of balance. With a shotgun , this is around the receiver. Carry it muzzle forward. This is something the NVA and VC can teach you. When moving fast and quiet through trees and brush, the gun makes a very small profile this way.

The VC would carry guns muzzle forward usually over the shoulder. You can slip between brush faster and easier. Carry it at the side slightly tucked up like you see football players run with a football. This will help you protect it if you fall. In the early morning hours especially, angle the barrel up to almost eye level for the muzzle. This will knock spider webs out of the way instead of getting them in the face. When moving down hill, hold the gun on the side closest to the hillside for balance.

When you get to where the squirrels are, its usually one of these this time of year. It is their favorite thing here. And the nuts usually ripen before any of their other foods. Later closer to November they LOVE beech nuts. They aren’t ready yet though.

I didn’t get anything yesterday. All I did was burn calories, sweat and drink water. I did take a moment to goof around though.

I have had this KABAR for 20 years now. The handle is the leather stacked washers but it has gone nearly black from years of dirt, sweat, blood and grime. I have more expensive knives and maybe even better quality but I love these. Howard isn’t crazy about the KABAR even though he was a Marine. I guess they didn’t do a very good job indoctrinating him and its likely the reason why he isn’t a Marine anymore. Too smart for USMC but oddly stubborn about one thing they got right. Interesting factoid. The year I bought that knife I also bought one each for 5 people for Christmas. Now all but one of those people are dead. I bought two for myself. I always try to have at least one back up for anything I love, This one has been so good the other one is still in its original box in storage never having been used.

I like them because they are a great general purpose outdoor knife. Maybe not best at any one thing but more than good enough. I have skinned deer, squirrel and rabbit, Hacked down brush and made fire wood. Used for eating and digging and scraping poison ivy off me. I guess I have used them for everything but scratching my ass. Easy to sharpen and tough. I just like them.

With it is one of the best working shotguns ever made, My Model 31 which I have mentioned many times. Maybe I will have to make a dedicated article on the Model 31 soon.

I didn’t bring any meat home for the pot but I did over eat pawpaws and produce enough sweat to refill the ocean.

Rural King Statement On Guns

Seems that not every big box store is willing to cuck out to the antigun radical leftists. I see a notable uptick in their sales in the future

Edit

I’ve only ever purchased from Rural King once. They sent me a Chinese knockoff of what I ordered. While they may be pro gun, they might not be pro consumer. Be careful where you buy from. Rural King won’t be getting any more money from me.

-Howard