WILSON COMBAT VICKERS 1911 MAGAZINE

Wilson Combat has been making in my opinion the best 1911 mags for years now. The 47D being a gold standard. A while ago they worked with Larry Vickers to make what he thought the perfect mag for a 1911 should be.

Larry explains it all in the video. I have to say now that I have had one for a while after paying nearly 60 yankee green backs for it, I have to tell you it is one hell of a great magazine.

In the picture above you can see the Vickers mag with the older mag design and the newer mag. As LAV says in the video, all the holes are closed up on the Vickers mag. This keeps out dirt or anything else that could possible get in and cause an oopsie.

I really like the metal floorplate/bump pad.

I have used this mag in 12 different guns and fired close to 1,000 rounds with it in the various guns. What can I say other than it works like a Wilson Combat mag. Is it worth the 50plus dollars? Eh… that I don’t know. If it was as much as the other mags I would buy it exclusively. As it is, I don’t see me doing that. I have 100 percent faith with the other Wilson mags and have never had any trouble with them so I won’t be replacing them with the Vickers Tactical mags unless there is about a 20 dollar drop in price. IF the price doesn’t bother you and you really have trouble keeping crud out of your mags I can say they are worth it. They are damned nice though.

Ultra Rarities: Dardick 1100 and 1500 Pistols

Double post today with another great article from Kevin O’Brien

In the history of firearms, one of the obscure yesterday’s “weapons of tomorrow” whose morrow never dawned was the Dardick “tround” (triangular round) system. The idea was for the weapon to use special trounds, or tround adapters that took a round of conventional fixed ammunition — .38 Special, for the standard Dardick, although an attempt was made at a .50 Dardick gun for aircraft usage. There was also a triplex tround.

dardick_ammo_display_01

The ammunition’s unusual sectional shape made it easy, at least in theory, to design feeding mechanisms.

Dardick never successfully commercialized his product, instead surviving for some years on R&D money from the military.

A seller at GunBroker has not one, but two, of these for sale in a single auction: a Model 1500, the most common Dardick (although “common” in Dardick terms means there may have been three dozen made), and a rarer Model 1100.

dardick_1100_01

I don’t think it gets much more obscure than this! Up for auction are my two Dardick pistols and small collection of Trounds, pamphlets, etc. Both are original and complete.

The more scarce of these two is the Model 1100. It is said that only 40-50 firearms total were ever produced by the Dardick Corporation and only a small handful of those were the Model 1100, one of which was presented to JFK by David Dardick. This 1100 has not been test fired with live ammo but functions/cycles flawlessly in both double and single action.

dardick_1100_02

The Model 1500 is complete but will need some work to get it running smoothly. As it sits, the cylinder and other components rub on the frame and do not rotate/cycle without assistance.

dardick_1500_01

Both pistols have the complete adjustable sights and fully functional firing pin selector/adjustment features in-tact. These pistols have NOT been refinished and the factory etched/white information is clear and not painted over on the barrel and receiver of each.

Included in the collection are a selection of several live Trounds (one .38 HiVAP, Two Well Busters, a .50 caliber and a standard Tround with what appears to be a smaller projectile than the usual .38 projectile, possibly a .32?). Also included are an original box for the Model 1500 and several original/old stock pamphlets and booklets.

via Dardick 1100 and 1500 Pistols : Other Collectible Guns at GunBroker.com.

dardick_memorabiia_01

The initial bid requested on the auction is $5,000. There are two ways of looking at this. It’s a lot of money for a couple of guns you’ll likely never have ammo to fire, that’s one way. And then there’s the other way: two guns from a remarkable dead-end lineage of firearms history, guns which personify 1960s Space Age firearms design, for about the price of one relatively common WWII rarity like a Johnson or a modern replica like Ohio Arms Works BAR.

Only you know if it’s worth $5k to you. We regret we can’t buy every firearm we feature in these pages. (Hmmm… how long till we qualify for a reverse mortage, we could monetize the Manor….?)

About Hognose

Former Special Forces 11B2S, later 18B, weapons man. (Also served in intelligence and operations jobs in SF).

Bubba’s Glock is Baaaaack!

Today we have another older article from our departed friend Kevin O’Brien.

Something about the way a Glock’s nylon parts interact with a Dremel, a woodburning tool, or a soldering iron, seems to bring out the best beast in Bubba. For example, we had the infamous “stricken with Gleprosy” Glock we described as “a marital aid for a Komodo lizard” back in May, 2014:

glock-stipling-gone-stupid

Can’t unsee that, can you? That was ugly, but the one that probably inspired the most shock and horror was this one, from 4 July 2013, which we billed as: The Continuing Adventures of Bubba the Gunsmith — Glock edition.

Bubbas_Glock_mod

Indeed, most sentient Bubbas would disclaim any involvement in the horror above.

The Gunbroker auction (which has now aged off GB) ended, if we recall, without the gun meeting what struck us as a stratospheric reserve.

glock-19-trigger-guard

Well, guess what? It’s baaaack!

Hat tip Miguel, who says “The Fitz Special is NOT a fashionable or safe thing.” We’d actually disagree with that, because a Fitz Special was a double action revolver, so it had a stiff enough trigger pull that it would not, essentially, shoot you itself. In 2013, Bubba was selling the Frankenglock with a “DeSantis Belly Band,” which made us note:

‘Cause nothing says “Bubba is My Gunsmith” like a testicle with a 9 or 10 millimeter hole in it.

We’re not sure the twitter ad is for real because the Glock in the GB ad is described as a G23, and the Glock in the twit pic is described as a G19, even though it’s the same picture from 2013. It may be a sales scam or a come-on for a holdup.

On the other hand, the 2013 bravado about a belly band is a pretty good match for the

Anyway, if you feel unreasonably impeded by trigger guards, and don’t want to blow your balls off (or, maybe you’re a female without any, or Caitlyn Jenner/Bradley Manning looking for some way to get rid of a pair, but you’re still diffident about inflicting gunshot wounds upon your nether regions), then consider a real Fitz Special. Here’s a nice one from GunBroker; it’s on a .455 Colt New Service military pistol, with uncertain origins, but it sold for $1,000.

Colt Fitz Special

Here’s another undocumented Fitz, with a story it’s an original Fitz on a Smith and Wesson Model 37, again a completed auction from GunBroker. This one sold for $400 — somebody got a steal, even if it’s a clone.

Smith 37 Fitz Special

Conversely, the muzzle of this one looks a bit crude. Not Bubba crowning, but not as good as it might be. And the host gun is an economy-priced Charter Arms .44 Bulldog, so it’s priced accordingly: starting bid of $250.

Charter Arms Bubba Fitz

Exercise for the reader: compare the old revolver Fitz Specials or clones, to this abortion of a Glock, and count your blessings that the capability to hack metals is not as widely indulged as the capability to butcher plastics.

And if you want a Fitz Special, be patient and set a GunBroker alert. One will come to you in due course. You can stick that safely in your belly band, unlike a similarly hacked Glock.

And leave the sex-change surgery to board-certified surgeons