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What’s the best AR15 stock?

I was perusing a gun forum and stumbled across someone asking this question.

There were all sorts of answers. From people saying the old CAR stock is all you need, to people saying your stock choice depends on your optic choice. Various blanket answers like “LMT SOPMOD” or “Magpul CTR”.

Wasn’t that long ago there was only a handful of option. Now it seems like every company makes their own stocks, grips, hand guards, and the like.

At this point, it is more a matter of person preference than anything else.

Let’s take a quick look at a couple.

CAR stock

This is the classic “CAR” stock. Light and compact, it is my favorite collapsible stock. You could argue that it does everything you need, but it lacks many modern conveniences such as QD sling sockets or a bottom sling mount.

M4 “waffle” stock

The M4 stock, aka a “waffle” stock moves adds a sling mount to the bottom, allowing for more traditional sling usage.

B5 “SOPMOD” stock

Back in the early 80s, if not even earlier, there were various designs for an improved cheekweld stock. This pretty much got finalized with the NSWC SOPMOD stock. This stock is now made by a few companies, and many other companies offer stocks with sloping sides for “improved cheekweld”. On many of these, that gives some storage space. This B5 stock, like the later LMT SOPMODs, have a QD socket in them.

Magpul ACS stock with old style extended buttpad

Some figured that a couple of battery compartments are not enough, so they added even more storage space. Put in a cleaning kit, or extra CLP. Maybe even jam a “fun sized” Snickers bar in there. Just note that some designs, like the VLTOR stocks, can grab beards and pluck hairs.

Magpul CTR with old style extended buttpad

I remember the Magpul CTR was considered a pretty big deal when it came out. It had a second lock that would eliminate all slop and wobble making it lock up like a fixed stock. All the advantages of a fixed stock, in a collapsible stock. I didn’t like it at first until I learned about the extended rubber buttpads. Now I really like it. But all of mine have worn and have plenty of slop like the old CAR and M4 stocks. If a person didn’t need the QD socket, I would suggest getting the MOE stock, which is the same profile minus the QD socket and extra friction lock.

Ruger RPR stock. Adjustable for length, cheek piece height, the butt pad can be adjusted in height and rotation.

For the bench rest or space-gun shooter, there are all manner of stocks that are extremely adjustable. While these designs vary, many of them have so much adjustment they can be custom adjusted to suit a particular shooters individual needs.

But, we shouldn’t forget fixed stocks.

M16A2 stock

There are the old M16, M16A1 stocks. The slightly longer (about 5/8 inch IIRC) A2 stock. Rarer odd ball options like the CS stock. If a person wants a fixed stock, they can find them in several lengths. “Entry” fixed stocks tend to be the shortest, and there are extensions available for those freaks out there that think an A2 stock is too short.

Colt CS stock marking. The CS stock is A1 length, but made of the A2 materials.

You can get fixed stocks like the Magpul PRS or the LMT DMR stock that are adjustable for length, cheek height and are designed to ride a rear bag.

There there are all sorts of other options like the non-stock braces, or stocks designed for non-AR weapon systems. Now that we can shoulder braces, there are some people who prefer these braces over standard stocks. That seems odd to me, but it is an option. There are shorter stocks, side folders, etc that will work with alternative recoil systems.

Some people highly recommend fixed stocks for precision rifles. Sometimes it is for the extra weight to reduce recoil, but often the argument is that wobble in the adjustable stock would adverse effect precision shooting. Personally, I’d rather have a collapsible stock as I prefer different length for different shooting positions and I like being able to reduce the length of the weapon for storage.

I think it really comes down to picking a stock that supports the sling and shooting positions you want to do and allows you to be repeatable in your head position.

And that isn’t even broaching in on the weird options like stocks made for visor use.

AR15.com 26" Covert Takedown Case

I was looking for a smaller case to put an SBR or broken down AR in. I have owned several AR soft cases and have paid quite a bit of money for them. About a year ago I saw the AR15.com 26″ Covert Takedown Case. For 60.00 dollars it looked like a case worth taking a chance on. Unfortunately it was never in stock. I finally clicked the notify when in stock button and was on the notification list for a long time. To my fortune, when I was notified it was back in stock, it was on sale for 30.00 dollars.  Without hesitation I got one. At this price point it was worth the chance to gamble on the case.  Looking back now, I should have bought two or three of them at that price. This case has many features higher priced cases come with and a little more.

26″ Covert Takedown Case

Specifications/Features:

Velcro Straps/MOLLE:

One of the main reasons I looked at the ARFCOM case were the eight (8) Velcro straps that come with the case. Pretty much all soft rifle cases come with two (2) Velcro straps. The versatility of having (8) straps, gives you unlimited rifle mounting and accessory mounting options throughout the case, with the three (3) rows of MOLLE loops.

Eight (8) Velcro Straps

Adjustable Velcro Strap

Dimensions:

With the dimensions of  26L x 12W x 4D, there is ample room to place the upper & lower of your 10.3″ to 16″ rifle as well as its mounted accessories and additional accessories, in the case.

AR6720 / 26″ Case

LE6920 / 26″ Case

D-Rings:

The case comes with four (4) D-rings on the back.  These are large and seem to be very secure. The case does not come with a strap, but the addition of the D-rings allows you to mount a shoulder strap, if you want.

Four (4) D-Rings

D-Ring

Padding:

The case comes with upper and lower Velcro pockets for  the foam padding sheets. The foam sheets are removable and replaceable. The padding is very generous at 3/4 of an inch on both the top and bottom. The foam padding sheet is a three (3) part sheet, a soft foam middle sheet, sandwiched between a top and bottom cardboard type layer, that has a thin foam coating.  This pads the case nicely and creates some rigidity to the case.  The (3) layer foam sheets also help the soft foam to avoid memory prints/indents. Surprisingly, the (3) layer foam sheets appear to be nicer and thicker than on the closed-cell foam on other higher end cases.

Velcro Pocket / Foam Padding

(3) Layer Foam Pad

Velco & Zippers:

The case comes with a double sided carry handle that has a loop around Velcro closure. This allow you to secure both sides of the handle together for easier carry and security.  The main compartment of the case  has two (2) large zipper tabs. The zipper teeth are large and function very smoothly.

Zipper / Tab

Carry Handle

Observations:

The AR15.com 26″ Covert Takedown Case appears to be made very well. The stitching is well done and it appears that it will hold up very well. I was unable to find out any real material specifications on the case.  The case appears to be at least 500 Denier Cordura Nylon Fabric. The older version of the case had a stitched on AR15.com patch, that is no longer offered.  It now has a Velcro loop patch so you can add any patch you would like on the case. I have compared this case to several other soft cases I have and the construction seems to be very close.

26″  Covert Takedown Case

Final Thoughts:

The mounting options with the size and (8) Velcro straps makes this case a huge winner in my book. The price point is also a major winner with this case. Even at the full price of 60.00 dollars, you could buy two of these cases for the price of some of the big name brand cases. With what I am going to be using the case for and probably what you will too, I do not see the advantage or need to step up into a higher priced case. There is so much the case can carry with your rifle and accessories, it is only limited to your imagination. As you can see from the pictures, you can place your fully outfitted rifle with magazines and other accessories with no problem. You even have some more room to spare.

Duncan