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Aimpoint T-1 And Eotech XPS series Size Comparison

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Getting my hands on the smaller Eotech over the weekend, we thought we would take some pictures to compare them in size.  A lot of people ask us about this and we had no chance to do this before now.   For those trying to decide which they want, this may help.  The Eotech is compact, but still no where near as small trim and light as the T-1.  We have often given our opinion on the eotech and how we feel it can not be trusted based on the  many, many instances of its failures in front of us or models we owned in the past. But there are always gonna be those who want them because they see SEAL or some such using them.   Keep in mind even a lot of guys in SOCOM DO not care and will use what is handed to them.  But, the point is, here is a comparison for those who want to see a good side by side. You can do you own research on which one you think will work best for you otherwise.   You can find out thoughts and feelings on the trustworthiness of the Eotech in other posts.

New Pro Gun Laws in Kentucky

Signed into law this week

Senate Bill 100, sponsored by state Senator Sara Beth Gregory (R-16), streamlines the Concealed Deadly Weapons License (CDWL) process by allowing applicants to submit their forms electronically. This applies to both new and renewing applicants. Allowing applicants to submit license information electronically provides them with greater access to the CDWL process.

Senate Bill 125, sponsored by state Senator Dennis Parrett (D-10), allows honorably discharged service members to waive the training requirement for a concealed deadly weapon license with the proper documentation.

Senate Bill 232, sponsored by state Senator Brandon Smith (R-30), requires that a chief law enforcement officer (CLEO) sign an application for the transfer of any item regulated under the National Firearms Act (NFA) within fifteen days if the applicant is not prohibited by law from receiving it. By removing any possibility of personal bias and creating a statewide standard, SB 232 protects the rights of law-abiding gun owners across the Bluegrass State.

House Bill 213, sponsored by state Representative Joni Jenkins (D-44), allows corrections officers, current or retired, of urban-county governments or consolidated local governments to use their professional training to satisfy the training requirement in applying for a concealed-carry permit. HB 213, as amended by state Representative Stan Lee (R-45), also allows new residents in Kentucky who have valid concealed carry licenses from other states that have a reciprocal agreement with the Kentucky Department of State Police, to waive the training requirements for Kentucky licenses and to use the out-of-state license in Kentucky for their first 120 days of residence, providing that within sixty days of the resident moving to Kentucky, he or she delivers a form and accompanying documents by registered or certified mail to the Department of Kentucky State Police, evidencing proof of a valid out-of-state license to carry a concealed deadly weapon. This amendment also stipulates that an out-of-state concealed carry license will become invalid in Kentucky upon either the passage of 120 days or issuance to the person a valid Kentucky concealed deadly weapons license.

House Bill 351, sponsored by state Representative Gerald Watkins (D-3), allows an individual who has legally sought a court-issued Emergency Protection Order (EPO) the ability to better defend themselves by expediting the permitting process for a CDWL, after a background check. Senate Bill 106, sponsored by state Senator Jared Carpenter (R-34), was the Senate counterpart to HB 351 and its language and identical intent were included as well

WW2 Japanese Canteen With Trench Art and Campaign Markings By US Marine

 

This is a very interesting bit of history I thought would be worth sharing.   It is a canteen taken from a fallen Japanese soldier during WW2.  My friend’s father in law was a Marine during the war in the 1st Division I believe it was.  At any rate.  He kept it from the soldier he killed and as the war went in, he carved.scratched/engraved the name and date of every battle and invasion he was in.

 

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You can also see some of the trench art scratched into it by the Japanese soldier. The Japanese flag being on the canteen already was likely the reason the Marine picked this one to keep in the first place.

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Some manufacturing marks, or some such. I am not expert on WW2 Japanese canteen markings, so I have no real idea.   Fascinating none the less.

 

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And the Marine who brought it back,  Earning many medals by the wars end.

 

Certainly is not something you see often and I would like to personally think my friend for letting me share this unique item with everyone.

 

 

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