Patriot Technology M203 Quadrant Sight Laser Assist Modification Model 2 (P203QLAM2)

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I often pass time scrolling through Ebay and Gun Broker looking for unusual military firearm items related to AR-15/M-16/M4. After 32 years in the Army and being interested in military firearms my entire adult life, there isn’t much that I’m not familiar with. However, when I saw the Patriot Technology P203QLAM2 on Ebay I was mystified. It is an M203 accessory that I had never seen before. When I first looked at the auction listing photos, I wasn’t convinced that the P203QLAM2 was a legitimate piece of military equipment. I immediately turned to the internet to see what I could learn.

The only information that I could find on the Patriot Technology P203QLAM2 was an article posted by the 307th Bomb Wing of the United States Air Force and the contract award data that was miraculously saved on ‘The 5.56 x 45mm Timeline’ that is hosted here on www.looserounds.com and managed by Mr. Daniel Watters. These two sources of information validated that the P203QLAM2 really was a piece of military equipment so I clicked the ‘Buy It Now’ option for $110.00.

Screen shot of the Ebay listing after ‘Buy It Now’

HISTORY

The military history of the P203QLAM2 began in March 2007 with the contract award by the United States Air Force Combat Command to Patriot Technology for an unknown number of sights. Here is the contract verbage as posted on the ‘5.56 x 45mm Timeline’.

“March 2007- USAF Air Combat Command, Mountain Home AFB – 366 CONS awards a $11,850 contract to Patriot Technology for M203 IR Quadrant sights.”

There probably wasn’t many sights procured. If the government was charged around $300 per sight unit, this would have equated to roughly 39 or 40 sight units received. $200 per sight unit would have equated to 59 or 60 sight units. I would be surprised if they were priced much lower than that.

Per the introduction on the single page (double-sided) ‘Field Manual P-FM1-04.1 (images provided later in this post),”The P203QLAM2 was created to add night targeting capability to the M203 grenade launcher quadrant sight and to adapt the assembly to allow mounting on the receiver top rail forward of the CCO(M68). The addition of the invisible laser allows the shooter to engage targets at night using night vision goggles.”

As mentioned previously, the only other information that I could find on the grenade launcher sight was and article published by the 307th Bomb Wing of the United States Air Force. The article documented the 917th Security Forces Squadron qualifying with the M203 grenade launcher on November 4th, 2010 at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana just prior to deployment. The P203QLAM2 can be seen mounted on their weapons. I added the red box to the images so that you could easily locate the P203QLAM2.

Link to original article: https://www.307bw.afrc.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/183241/917th-sfs-train-with-the-m203/

Airman First Class Clint Melancon attempts to qualify with the M203 Grenade Launcher on the 203 Range at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Nov. 4, 2010. Airmen Melancon is assigned to the 917th Security Forces Squadron at Barksdale AFB, and is qualifying on the weapon system as part of his pre-deployment requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jeff Walston) The P203QLAM2 is shown mounted on the M4 inside the red box.
Senior Airman Earl Stoudemire, 917th Security Forces Squadron, takes aim with a M203 Grenade Launcher as Technical Sgt. Brian Tyler, assistant non-commissioned officer-in-charge, 917th Security Forces Squadron, Combat Arms, looks on at the 203 Range on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Nov. 4, 2010. Airman Stoudemire was attempting to qualify with the M203 Grenade Launcher as part of his pre-deployment requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jeff Walston)
Airman First Class Clint Melancon attempts to qualify with the M203 Grenade Launcher on the 203 Range at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Nov. 4, 2010. Airmen Melancon is assigned to the 917th Security Forces Squadron at Barksdale AFB, and is qualifying on the weapon system as part of his pre-deployment requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jeff Walston)

SIGHT DETAILS

The P203QLAM2 came in a simple heavy duty cardboard box. There are no significant markings on the box except for a ‘Made In USA’ label and a nomenclature label on one end of the box.

Front of the shipping box
Left side of box showing nomenclature and Lot number
Right side of box

Inside the box, the sight was wrapped in simple brown kraft paper. I do not know if this is how these units actually shipped or if this is just how this thing has traveled since leaving the military inventory.

The ‘Field Manual P-FM1-04.1’ is a single page, double-sided document that provides all needed information on the sight unit.

Front of the single page ‘Field Manual’ for the P203QLAM2 sight.
Back of the single page ‘Field Manual’ for the P203QLAM2 sight

The P203QLAM2 consists of 3 assembly groups. 1) The mounting adapter 2) the quadrant sight 3) the laser.

P203QLAM2 shown out of the box.

Mounting Adapter

The mounting adapter is a simple affair that consists of a steel plate that is 3-5/8″ long and 1-1/8″ of an inch wide. The steel plate connects to the normal spacer that is used with the military specification quadrant sight. The mounting adapter has a simple thumb screw assembly that enables the P203QLAM2 to be mounted to the 1913 rail.

Front 3/4 view of the P203QLAM2 sight assembly
Right-side view of the P203QLAM2 sight assembly.
Bottom view of the P203QLAM2 sight assembly showing the details of the thumb screw mounting mechanism.

Quadrant Sight

The quadrant sight is no different from the standard issue NSN: 1010-01-442-2313 quadrant sight for use on carry handles except that it uses the previously discussed mounting adapter. The quadrant sight is adjustable from 50 meters to 400 meters in 25 meter increments.

Standard issue, unmodified, M203 Quadrant Sight

LASER

The P203QLAM2 is rated at 780nm (nanometers). To give this some context for people who are not familiar with laser light, visible light is produced in the 380nm to about 700nm spectrum. 700nm to 1mm produces Infra-Red (IR) light which is invisible to the human eye.

The laser is housed in an aluminum tube type assembly that sits atop an offset steel mount. The offset steel mount is secured to the top of the M203 quadrant sight arm. The laser body moves up and down with the quadrant sight arm as the M203 gunner makes range adjustments.

Left rear 3/4 view of the sight assembly

The laser is adjustable for elevation and windage. There is a ‘lock’ screw that is used to secure the elevation and windage screws after adjustments have been made. The control cable that extends from the rear of the laser body is 15 inches in length as measured from the back of the laser body to the end of the pressure switch.

Front left 3/4 view of sight assembly

Power Source

The ‘Field Manual’ that comes with the P203QLAM2 does not say anything about what type of battery is supposed to be used with the sight unit. With a little bit of mechanical reasoning, I figured out how to get into the battery compartment. You access the battery compartment by rotating the knurled backplate on the sight body counter-clockwise to remove the battery cover. Removing the battery cover revealed a single CR123A (Lithium) battery. You insert the battery cover into the battery compartment and turn it clockwise to reinstall it.

Image showing the battery compartment opened up. The P203QLAM2 is powered by a single CR123A battery.
Detail view looking inside of the battery compartment
Detail view showing the inside of the battery cover.

Summary

Overall, the P203QLAM2 is a pretty unique piece of equipment. The device is pretty simplified. Although construction seems to be sturdy, this item does not strike me as being durable long-term and perhaps that is why it only earned a blip in the history of military small arms.

The images below are of a ‘clone’ of the Air Force weapon shown in the photos above that I put together from items in my collection. The base rifle is the Colt LE6920SOCOM (2018 model) with a Colt M203 grenade launcher. My Colt M203 has a 9″ barrel whereas the M203 shown in the Air Force photographs has a standard 12″ barrel. I used an Aimpoint M2 red dot sight along with the Knights Armament M203 leaf sight as seen in the photos. Lastly, you see the P203QLAM2 installed. I did not ‘install’ the switch cord in any way. It is simply laying along the hand guard of the carbine.

This image shows the P203QLAM2 mounted on the M203 quadrant sight. The rifle shown is a Colt LE6920SOCOM (2018 variant) with Colt M203 grenade launcher.
Left side of assembled ‘clone’ carbine
Right side of assembled ‘clone’ carbine

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