LooseRounds.com5.56 Timeline
Weaponsman.com

 

15 thoughts on “They Grow ’em Big Out There”

    • There used to be a lot more of them.

      Then somebody told the Cajuns they were good eating, and that the bag limit was two, and that the season closed yesterday, and now they’re an endangered species.

      Reply
  1. The year is significant – 1937. By that time, folks on the Great Plains had been through some ferocious dust storms from ’33 to ’36, and for the folks in Montana, 1936 had been a year of temperature extremes. They had the hottest summer in some time, and the coldest winter too. On the northern plains, it appears to me that the grasshoppers are the worst in hot, dry years. There are USDA research scientists who have theorized that there are natural fungi that do better in wetter summers that hold down the numbers of grasshoppers. Well, with a hot, dry summer, you get some ferocious numbers of hoppers in the fields – enough to compete with cattle for the forage on a pasture.

    The picture might have been a spoof, but I’m sure there were farmers and ranchers in those years who wished they could have handled the grasshopper problem with a gun. They had few insecticides that would do anything against large numbers of grasshoppers back then. Today, one of the more commonly applied insecticides is “Dimilin,” which causes the exoskeleton of the grasshoppers to not form correctly. If you apply Dimilin to a field when the hoppers are in an early instar (stage of growth), say between the third and fourth instar, you will start to see hoppers that look like space aliens in a week as they outgrow their exoskeleton and look misshapen and bulbous.

    I hate grasshoppers. They’re a pain in the ass to manage as a farmer.

    Reply
    • “[F]or the folks in Montana, 1936 had been a year of temperature extremes. They had the hottest summer in some time, and the coldest winter too.”

      This just goes to show that the impact of humans on climate change has been going on for more than a century. As CO2 builds up in the atmosphere, we can expect extreme hot and cold temperatures, extreme droughts and flooding. And so on and so forth.

      Reply

Leave a Comment