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What change in the firearms world have you noticed in the past ten years?

This topic came up on arfcom and I thought it was an interesting discussion. A lot has happened since 2010. Lets take a look at some of the responses.


For me I’d say that thanks to the MHS trials we’re now living in the golden age of the polymer handgun. Also while I’d say it began circa 2008-09 we’re in the era of the cheap AR. The milsurp C&R market though has pretty much died out though.”

.”The guns themselves haven’t changed much.”

Republicans now love gun controlHe is right on that one.

The return of 9mm…..
The move from bigger pistols to smaller pistols.”

I would add to that, the amount of people who onec swore they would never carry a gun with a single stack mag and 7-8 round limit now carrying single stack mag pistols with 7-8 round limit. In rounds like .380 no less..

“Braces and other things that go to the edge of what is legal”

Ammo has quadrupled in price, and the AR has made the transition from ‘Evil Black Baby Killing Monster Machine’ to ‘America’s sporting rifle’. the proliferation of manufacturers who think they can match wits with John Moses Browning when it comes to handgun design.”

“The . b40 is a little bitch. But the 9mm is the shit. Short barreled PCC AR-15s are cool. But 5.56 pistols are not”. Two good and hilarious points.

At least two different generations of “perfection”.

  1. Explosion in online sales of ammo and firearms
  2. For pistols it is now a 9MM world no matter if guns are full, compact, or carry size
  3. Revolver sales have died
  4. Pistol braced firearms have exploded in popularity
  5. AR15 is now the most common rifle used for recreation, defense, and hunting where legal (especially for pigs)
  6. Pistol caliber carbines (and braced pistols in pistol calibers) are gaining traction more every year
  7. Red dot all the things
  8. Factory rifles are competing with custom rifles in accuracy and can consistently produce sub MOA with factory ammunition, and with lower cost than ever before
  9. Far too many big corp takeovers of gun manufacturers
  10. SJW impact on stores and companies getting out of the gun/ammo business

“NFA is faaaaaaaaaaaaaar more popular now. I got in just over 10 years ago and it was ultra rare to see NFA items at ranges. Now I see suppressors on the regular, along with SBRs – though those are declining due to pistol braces these days.”

So what do you think?

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9 thoughts on “What change in the firearms world have you noticed in the past ten years?”

  1. “The milsurp C&R market though has pretty much died out though.”
    Because the Mosin Nagant 91/30 that used to under $100 are now as much as $400, and other C&R rifles and handguns have gone up up as much as 1000%.
    CMP overcharges for junk M1 Garands and will rip you off for a Collector Grade rifle, as much as $3000 by auction only.
    I bought an unissued 1955 M1 for $1525 with my FFL03 with free shipping back in 2017. Normal handling marks, original wood darkened with age in storage, 99% bluing.

    Reply
    • Part of this is just that the global supply of non-NFA milsurp rifles is drying up.

      When was the last time a non-machine gun was in wide issue worldwide? The latest one I can think of is the Ishapore Enfield that was made into the late 60s and early 70s. That was +/- 50 years ago, and those all came here in the 1990s.

      Reply
      • Enfields are still in use. India and Pakistan still use them, but not as front line weapons.
        I have an Enfield 1918 SMLE MKIII* that was rebarreld by Enfield in 1921. It had been sporterized and I bought the barreled action and restored it to period correct condition with old new stock, wood and metal, form Liberty Tree Collectors and Sarco. NO reproduction parts. No import marks either. Only one minor problem, headspace. It fails NO GO but passes FIELD Gauge, so safe to shoot MilSurp 303 British and MilSpec IVI brass. Canada retired the Enfield in 2018, but is still used by hunters.
        “According to the Department of Defence, some 9,500 will be turned over to cadets for use in target practice while 5,000 will be offered as gifts to Canadian Rangers holding valid gun licences.”

        Reply
  2. I live in California where it is illegal to think for yourself.
    The good news is that there are half a dozen places in town where I can get a double decaf chai soy latte’ (Extra foam) for only $8!

    Reply
  3. – Many choices in hand gun styles, sizes, performance and looks.
    – All kinds of interesting quality holsters for open and conceal carry. No modifying holster to make them work.
    – Advances in quality HP ammo that make 9mm compete with 45acp (or any caliber)

    Reply
  4. Politically-speaking, the major change since 2010 is that there is no longer a broad bipartisan consensus against gun control. In 1994, the Democrats lost the House in a historic wave election, in large part due to the Brady Bill/Assault Weapons Ban. Those bills had notable Republican support (I’m looking at you, John Kasich), but the Democrats got blamed and took a shellacking. Then in 2000, Al Gore lost his home state in the Presidential election. If he’d won Tennessee, we’d never have heard about Hanging Chads or Bush v. Gore: Al Gore would have been President.

    Following those things, gun control became largely a dead issue at the national level for Democrats. Sure, everybody would say they supported a new AWB because that issue polled well, but no Democrat with national aspirations wanted to be seen as a gun grabber.

    That lasted until just after Obama’s 2012 re-election: Sandy Hook. The Obama administration went all-in for gun control, and a major preference cascade started, where Democrats who had quietly favored gun control started becoming vocal supporters of gun control because they thought they could get away with it now. The complete wipeout of the Blue Dog Democrats in the 2010 election also meant that there were essentially zero Democrats in DC who didn’t favor gun control.

    Now fast-forward to 2016: Hillary Clinton decided that she didn’t need white working-class voters for her coalition, despite having depended on them in her battle against Obama in 2008. (The woman really is a hall-of-fame terrible politician.) She bet on gun control being a way to mobilize her supporters in the blue hives. Trump bet the other way and won in no small part due to NRA and NRA fellow-traveler support.

    For 2020, the Democrats are doubling-down on gun control, with essentially every contender for the nomination seeking to outdo the next in their zeal for gun control, and one contender openly calling to confiscate Americans’ guns. Time will tell how this plays out for them. If they lose again, I don’t expect them to have another 2000-style change of heart on the topic: It looks like Dems are betting that swapping white working-class men with suburban middle-class moms will be a winning play for them. The suburban moms have been pretty reliable for Republicans since about 1994, but they’ve always been pro-gun control.

    The NRA’s epic collapse in the last year or so isn’t going to help matters.

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  5. LOL… The Republicans have always been for gun control, just as much as that “other half” of the Uniparty has been. The only real difference is that the rubes are catching on, and I suspect that things are going to go all kinetic for a bunch of these statist assholes that have been perpetuating the fraud that they were in general agreement with the stated “principles” of the Constitution and Republican Party. They’re all crooks, every one of them. The only difference is the mask they wear, and the role they play in the long con they’ve been playing on the rest of us.

    The one thing you can take from how the jaded and effete “elites” reacted to both Palin and Trump is that they think they own the rest of us, and that we are here for their amusement and exploitation. Sooner y’all internalize that set of facts, the better. The only thing I can say on the matter is that this is a good time to invest in hemp futures, and not the kind you smoke, either.

    I do sort of wonder, though, what sort of neck-snapping wonderfulness you’d get using your typical dynamic-arrest rock climbing rope and a fatass politician. How high up would you have to fasten the rope, and how far do you need to drop the fat fuck in order to pop that head off their shoulders like you crush a tick?

    My patience in these matters grows ever shorter. I do believe it is growing near the time when the Tree of Liberty cries out for the blood of tyrants in order to nourish its roots.

    Reply
    • So, fair enough. None of us have a lot of insight into what politicians *believe*, just into what they *say* and what they *do*. If you think of politicians as actors who are paid by their donors, you’re pretty close to reality, I think.

      There was a period of ~15 years where Republicans at the state level were reasonably good on guns and able to move the ball in the right direction, at least in many states. Much of that was, I think, due to Democrats being able to maneuver between slightly anti-gun and slightly pro-gun, making Republicans fear their voters if they switched to anti-gun. Now that Democrats are solidly anti-gun, the nominally pro-gun Republicans can’t be out-maneuvered by them to the pro-gun side, so they can look at their single-issue gun voters and say, “What are you gonna do, vote for the Democrat?” And then the Republicans vote for nonsense gun control like they passed in Florida after the Parkland murders.

      This is the same routine that Republicans have been pulling on pro-life voters since the 1980s. It’s one of the problems with your issue becoming a wedge issue between the parties. We’ve seen it happen on abortion, we’re watching it happen on gun control, and we are likely to see it happen with immigration in the post-Trump era. (Trump’s stated position on immigration is almost indistinguishable from Bill Clinton’s stated position in 1992 and 1996. But only one of them is Literally Hitler.)

      Reply

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