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Golf tips for the discerning shooter Part 2

I often tell people you can take golf training tips and replace golf with “shooting” and they apply.


Once again we look at a golfing calendar and see how the golf tips apply to shooting.

All credits goes to whom ever made that golfing calendar.

Lets look at the advise for January 2019:

Golf is deceptively simple and endlessly complicated; it satisfied the soul and frustrates the intellect.

Arnold Palmer

Once again replace Golf with Shooting and the quote applies perfectly. Shooting is very simple, lining up with the target and firing. But the nuances of trigger pull, sight alignment, optimizing loads, etc, can become extremely complex and frustrating.

The sweet spot on a golf club is a pin-sized location where the center of gravity lines up directly behind the ball providing maximum energy transfer on impact. Missing the sweet spot by an inch (2.5 cm) results in a 10% loss of energy. Worse though, it will cause undesired spin creating a hook, slice, excessive loft or top spin robbing you of distance. While companies advertise clubs with a bigger sweet spot, than their competitors, this is slightly misleading. The exact sweet spot cannot be altered buy by distributing the club’s weight differently, they can make a head that is more forgiving of misses.

Calendar

So. . .

Shooting precisely requires doing several things correctly at the same time. Aligning up the gun with the target correctly, pressing the trigger with out pulling the gun out of alignment with the target, and following though with the shot. No piece of equipment can compensate or eliminate bad form on your part. But good equipment can make shooting oh so much more easier.

Nowadays it is common to immediately have a trigger overworked or replaced, replace sights or add optics, etc. All those things can be major improvements to the “shoot-ability” of a firearm. But we just need to keep in mind that those might make a gun more forgiving, misses are still our fault.

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