SCATTERED SHOTS II

I am a little unorganized today, the post yesterday about  H. W. McBride took longer to get together  than I thought it would and it really eat in to the time I spend on the rest of a weeks line up.  So, today we are  doing another “Scattered shots” post where I say a few things about a gun and gun related subjects that cross my mind.  The first time I did this seems to have been well enough received so lets try it again.

First up I want to put you on to something that is actually pretty useful.  arma-dynamics has a page up showing graphics on where all manner of zeroes will hit on target with AR15s with most popular barrel length and ammo.  http://www.arma-dynamics.com/zero-considerations.html

If you are curious  about what I use  here it is.   For guns like a  MK12 or any precision rifle I use a 100 yard zero and I adjust my optic for shots further than 200 yards. I hold off for 200 and then start to dial it in further for precise shots.  The idea being I am am using an optic on a precision rifle I want to be able to hit the smallest target I can.   For guns like  an A2 or M4 using iron sights I use the 25.300meter zero.  The idea being I want the easier zero to keep all shots in a man’s chest out to 300, at which point I can start using the adjustment on the A2/A4 rear sight and apply elevation.   If I am shooting something that is just for playing or say, a retro A1 carbine or SBR with older style iron sights, I use the 50 yard zero. It works well with 55 grain M193 and its  a great  zero for  that ammo and gun.   I know it seems  like it would be a lot to remember but its really not. Or not for me anyway.

Earlier this week Howard wrote about the ACOG  and the models he has and likes best.  I meant to send him this graphic but like an idiot I forgot.   I think it came from Brian from over at The New Rifleman, who sometimes writers a post for us here when he isn’t being a lazy gold brick.

This image is from a report/power point from the U.S. Navy. – Howard

There is no doubt that shooting your carbine with an optic is just plain fun.  Never mind the fighting applications of the force multiplier of a magnified optic on a  carbine, it is just fine. What is more fun is when you put a huge optic on a small handy carbine.

Some years ago Howard bought this Leupold and sent it to me to borrow a while and play with it.    Man, I loved it.  The Mk 6  Leupold is a 3x-18x and in my opinion is my favorite optic of all time.  I love it’s features, I love it’s size and it’c clarity.  If I had to have only one optic to use for precision shooting at long range and moving it around on various AR pattern rifles in 5.56 and 7.62 it would be this one.  I slapped it on my 6940 with some bipods and put a real hurt on the crows that season.  I smacked the above crow in the head at  278 yards using  Hornady TAP 75 gr OTMs.

It may look odd to some people but it is hard to describe just how fun it is to put high quality optics with  higher magnification optics on a handy carbine and smack steel at range. Or even just shooting groups or skeet on a berm a a few hundred yards.  It is even funner when you put it on  a lightweight profile barrel and use it to really see what kind of accuracy you can squeeze out of a A1 profile barrel carbine.

The Leupold MK6 firmly placed it self as my favorite scope also. -Howard

Speaking of shooting targets at long range.  Here is a picture from a training range at a military range not too far from me. I hate to be”that guy”  but I can’t say where or a few people could get in trouble.  We have thought about trying to recreate this  unknown distance range with steel targets  all over, but the local morons would destroy the targets just out of drunken ignorance.  Anyway it is a great picture of a pretty nifty training range.

Speaking of military ranges, I been re-reading for the 4th time, the autobiography of Col. Charles Askins.   Col. Askins was a very controversial gun writer while he was alive.  If you get talking about ithim on certain gun forums you can still cause a  fuss.  the Colonel was not shy about his love for killing  people.  He was a champion pistol shot a veteran of the border Patrol in its wildest days, was in WW2, and Vietnam  and he was an accomplished big  hunter.

The good Colonel loved to describe all of his kills ( human) with the detail and satisfaction  of a man who really loves his work.  It was said of him he was the only man that many met that truly loved to be in a fight.   He killed several in his days in the BP where is famously used a shotgun with the “duckbill spreader” choke. He sniped Germans from building on the allied side of the Rhine when bored and killed   a few.   He went on to shoot a few Vietnamese commies  in the early days of the US involvement  with a .44 magnum.  Probably the first to do so in combat.   He wrote  several books on shooting and hunting and countless magazine articles.  He was a user of Colt 1911s and revolvers being a believe in the “fitz special”   wheel guns for carry. In that he really loved the New Service colt in .45  done up as a Fitz Special.    Which is the bobbed hammer and the front  part of the trigger guard removed and the barrel and ejector shortened.  Guns magazine has been making their older issues from the past 50 years available for reading for free on their website. You can read some of his articles there.

While looking though some of my old picture folders fore something else I ran across these. They are models Colt  had made up for future adoption or replacement of the M4.

The top SCW and the bottom rifle are piston guns.  A limited number of SCW stocks were sold at a crazy price.  I would have probably still bought one had I had the chance. -Howard

You can see some pretty interesting details. It is a shame they never made some of these.   The rifle with a monolithic rail and a collapsible butt stock would have been pretty cool to have. The SCW stock is something I wish they would turn loose of.   I am not sure how popular the  piston would be on the others.  They knew even back then not where near as many people actually wanted one as  people online would have you think.  The army  did some testing and found piston guns aren’t really all that much better than a DI  operated m4 and here we are , years after the HK416 came out and the piston crazy came and went.

And with the topic of popular myths that make an Ar15 work better is the old chestnut about downloading the magazines by two rounds.   Usually the problem comes from some worthy putting 21 or 31 rounds in a magazine.  Not from weak springs or something or other.

Some sources report that the 20 round mag spring could be installed backwards.  If someone did so the mag was reliable for 18 rounds, but not 20.  Some claim that is why downloading the 20 round mags was recommended.  I have had no issue with running 20 rounds in old USGI 20 round mags. -Howard

Back in those days the M16 was only supposed to be a stop gap until their wonder weapon of the future came out.   If you ever wondered what some of those atrocities looked like here are a few.  Maybe Daniel will pop into the comments and give some detail info about this for those interested.

Of course that didn’t happen and the M16 went on to be arguably our country’s greatest service rifle.

Above you can see a impressive selection of weapons used by US forces during the  Vietnam war.   There are M16s of all kinds, some  Stoner 63s, a Remington 7188 shotgun and the Xm148  launcher that was used before the M203.

Back in 2010 I was in D.C. and was able to stop into the NRA firearms museum.   It is worth going to if at all possible but I found it kinda sloppy in most of it’s displays with very little detail added.  I wish they would let me be in charge of the displays, I would give them something to be proud of. But they had two that I really liked.  One was Ed McGivern’s guns and some items,   He was one of the best pistol shots of all time.

The  other display was this  old shooting gallery.  Man, those were the days.

 

That is about it for the day.  I will leave with this.

 

 

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7 thoughts on “SCATTERED SHOTS II

  1. The only things I’ve ever heard about downloading mags was that it was supposed to help the springs last longer. How true that is i don’t know. And in one match I did do it to help on my reload speed on a closed bolt. ( every stage had a mandatory reload and it basically had to be mid mag unless you used 10 rounders)

    Anyone else see it much?

    • yes I agree, it absolutely does make it easier to seat a mag on a close bolt especially, that is an excellent point. In fact if you are in a match with a mandatory reload it would be good practice to down load by one or maybe even two for reloading on a closed bolt.

  2. I think that while some could debate whether the M16/M4 is America’s greatest service rifle, there is no debate any more that it is our longest serving service rifle.

    The reasons for this might not all be rooted in technical superiority. Some of the reasons are logistical – and that the rifle system works well enough that developing something better would take both substantial development effort and even more substantial monetary investment. The M16 proves the old engineering adage: “The enemy of the perfect is the ‘good enough,’ and the enemy of the good enough is the pursuit of ‘perfect.’ “

    • I would posit to you that the very fact that it is “good enough” ( thought I think it is much better than good enough ) and its modularity make it unparalleled in its usefulness and continued service life

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