All about those sights…

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By Cat Lindsay



At the last 2-hour weekly training class (MAGS Indoor Shooting Range), it was all about the sights.

I know there are alot of “point” shooters out there, which is fine shooting from retention from 0-5 yards, but if my arm is in lock-out, my eyes are looking for the sights!

After warm up drills (2 to the body, 1 to the head, then the two combined{failure drill}), we shot drills first with the strong hand, then switched to the off hand, making sure to keep the sights in focus during the transition (harder than you think!). Some shots we did on the same spot, some were from right to left, while some were from lower corner to upper corner. We did these drills from 3-10 yards away from the targets.

With shooting one-handed, the stance, grip, and lock-out stays the same as with shooting with both hands. There is a tendency to want to be too perfect with the shot, which leads to muscle fatigue, then slapping the trigger. As soon as any part of the front sight can be seen through the rear sight, on the target, the trigger needs to be released.

I occasionally turned on the safety while transitioning from right hand to left hand, so lost some time on some of the drills. If I ran empty, I reloaded one handed (release magazine, pinch gun between knees, reload, rack slide on belt). At the end of the night, we went back to both hands and it was so much easier!

Speaking of sights, I have been really liking the Trijicon HD Night Sights Mike installed 3 weeks ago. I love the big orange photoluminescent front dot and the “U” shaped back sight cutout. I find that I can pick up my sights quicker with the contrast. I did the one-handed drills with my Crimson Trace laser turned off and felt I didn’t lose much speed. The flat-fronted rear sight made racking the slide much easier, one-handed, as opposed to the slope-front one I had previously. The glow at night on my headboard is also very comforting. These night sights are well worth the cost.

So, the next time you’re on the range, take some time to work on sighted, one-hand drills. You never know when knowing this skill may come in handy for personal protection.