My survival and Get Home Gear Part 2

In part 2 of my posting about my survival gear and get home bag I will show and explain the extra items added during winter and cold weather months.

Obviously the winter requires different clothing gear and other things to stave off dying from exposure. So, with the change of the year I add more to the  gear and I also swap to another pack to carry the extra clothing and survival items.  The pack I use is the large ILBE pack for winter. Everything in the 3 day assault pack seen in my last article on the subject is moved over into this pack. It is heavier then the small pack, but I feel when the weather is more extreme, it is worth the trade off.

The large pack will hold another human inside it if used to its fullest potential. It also will allow you to attach the 3 day pack to the outside. MOLLE covers the back of it and sides for any additional things you want to add with buckles to secure it. The pack has two side zippers so you can get into it without going through the top. You can see in the picture that I added a GP pouch in front and an extra nalgene bottle holder on the side.  The other side secures the therma rest air mattress nice and tight.

The winter gear  in the picture above goes into the large winter pack with all my other normal stuff.  In it is a gortex parka and pants that are water proof and wind proof, a set of silk weight pants and shirt to wear under normal clothes if its not too cold or just cooler and wet. I also keep another two pair of smart wool socks and some wool gloves, a neck gaitor and a fleece hat. One the right side is a  ECWS wild things extreme cold weather parka. It is not water proof but will repel water. It is for extreme cold but dry weather. As inside layer I have a grid fleece pull over shirt with grid fleece bottoms. I also have two pelican water and shock proof cases to carry various things to keep them safe and dry, like cell phones or any sensitive things.

A close up of the gortex. Also is the picture is an extra WXP source water carrier I add to the outside of the pack.

A close up of the fleece and other layers. All of it goes into a water proof ruck sack liner to keep it dry in a heavy rain or a spill into a river or falling over a water fall.

The gas mask is something that I sometimes add to my kit. It does not stay in it full time, but depending on where I am going or other factors I can add it.  I think that a gas mask and plenty of extra filters are a very smart thing to have in your preparedness kit. Some may think it is crazy but it could very well come in handy and  be the most important thing of your entire life in the right situations.  Not all masks will protect against chemicals or biological and nuclear so make sure you get what you think you need. I am more worried about major civil unrest and maybe areas CS gas is being used.  If some one drops mustard gas in my area, just a mask won’t be helping me by itself so its a moot point. If you live in an area with chemical spills, you need  a different set of chemical protection gear so read up and learn about it before spending a ton of money on something that would melt to your face.

Now, my gear is not just for fighting my way home or evading and escaping some unknown evil force. It is also for helping my through a catastrophe.  It is more likely I would get stranded some where then to fight off aliens from the future.  So I always make sure to have plenty of things to signal with.

Here are three examples of what I consider some of my most important items. These are used to signal  if I roll over a hill.  Are lost in the woods or  need to  flag down a medical chopper or the police depending on what is going on. A cell phone is great. But some times even if you have a GPS, maybe they do not. Or if could be so heavy brush, they can not find you. If a medical chopper is coming and seconds count. It is best to have something to signal with RIGHT NOW.   For this I have these three things. A military VZ17 signal panel with orange and pink sides that folds out to become fairly large and very easy to see, A yellow smoke grenade and a MK 7 hand parachute signal flare.  All can be seen from ther air easy and the panel can be laid on the ground, in a tree, on top of a broken down car or waved in the air on a large pole or stick by the person needing help.  I also carry a smaller US airforce pilots signal panel  small enough for a pants pocket on my person when on a long hike and keep two or three in the  vehicle just in case along with road flares and signal mirrors and chemical lights.   You are more likely to be trying to stay alive and need to signal help before you ever need to get away from some invading force like in Red Dawn, so always have several forms of signaling for help.   For the rest of my gear and summer month items read the Part 1 of this series.

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