4Th of July Sales on the Web

Right now if you go to Tacticalgear.com  and use the promo code 1776  on their cart ppage you can get$ 17.76 off orders over 100 bucks.

Its a great company with great customer service. Check them out and see if they got something you need ( want). www.tacticalgear.com

Stay here for  updates for  holiday discounts.

 

 

http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=21264a90c7e86ae5630f2edb4&id=3e318bc989

 

Truprep is having a sale this holiday  as well. Some nice stuff and good deal.

The Colt LE901 A Look at the Parts

I got a few pictures of the BCG  stripped to show the differences in the parts and the size compared to a 5.56 and other  308 pattern rifles.

The BCG stripped for cleaning. The firing pin retaining pin slot has a very nice recessed slot to protect it.

Firing pin and firing pin spring. Colt says DO NOT remove firing pin spring from the firing pin.

901 bolt with firing pin.   You can not tell from this picture but the gas ring on the bolt is one piece.

Front view of the bolt face. Notice how thick and strong the lugs are. This is a heavy duty  part and shouts QUALITY.  Just like all Colt rifles, the bolt is MP inspected, proof fired and hardened. Not in batches, but every one.

The inside of the carrier still looks clean even after 500 rounds fired with no cleaning or lube.

Massive cam pin.

Here is the charging handle. Notice the ridge, or lip on the bottom rear.

A look up into the upper receiver. If you look close you can see the part added for piston conversion on later models.

Check back for more testing of the 901’s accuracy out to 1000 yards coming up.

Comment from Catherine Kim

Catherine Kim submitted this:

Growing up in a beach city in Southern California, firearms were not a common household item. In school I was taught the NRA was “bad.” I had not seen or touched a gun until my mid-twenties. Because of the media, I associated guns with violence. Why do we need guns? Won’t the police protect me? Aren’t guns for criminals? In an idealistic world of course I want to believe there are no needs for weapons, but as my family members and I were put through dangerous situations I became realistic. I have to be my own protector.

We reach an age where we want to try different things and venture out. I’m a strong believer you can’t be judgmental unless you truly try to understand from both sides of the view. So after celebrating New Years in Las Vegas, I decided to go to the gun range. My first firearm was a M249 SAW… a machine gun. My heart was pumping with anxiety. I had never heard a gunshot before. It was loud and the room was cold. Will I do this right? Will I hurt others or myself? I quickly learned it wasn’t that bad at all. Actually it was exhilarating and fun. From that moment the inner firearm fanatic grew. I’ve learned there’s a whole other world to shooting whether for target practice or hunting. It’s not just for the “bad” people. It’s opened an exciting realm full of adventure.

Today, I have several firearms and although I have expanded my knowledge, I am still constantly learning something new. I love shooting guns and my bow. Sometimes you just need to conquer your fears and then you will realize that it’s not bad at all. You only fear what you don’t know. I encourage my friends (especially females) to try it. Go to the range with someone that is knowledgeable and have a good time. I think what most people will realize is it’s a lot of fun and with the proper training you can make it into a hobby you truly love. Now, I am the protector of my house and a proud member of NRA.

 

Q&A for looserounds.com for the 901 and anything else firearms or gear related

We are going to be adding a Q&A to looserounds  soon. If you have any questions  you want answered about anything gun related, or military related just ask.  We have noticed a lot of people searching for info  close to what we are writing about and realized we could answer those questions uf you just asked.

Also You can ask about the  Colt 901. As far as I know  we are the first to have any thing interesting about it up so feel free to ask whatever you want about it.  We will have a lot more to say about it in the coming days, but if you can not wait or we didnt cover what you wanted. Just ask.   Sorry but we can not tell you where babies come from. Try to keep it gun related.

Colt LE901 1st Impressions

Loose rounds was sent  the new modular 308 rifle from our friends over at Colt Defense today.  This is the new gun that has a 308 upper and a lower that can take a 5.56 upper to with a slight addition of an adapter block.  I got the gun and did a few groups with it and took some pics to get them up for everyone to see. Much much more to follow in the weeks to come!!

I set it up for the groups using a Leupold in Larue mounts. Shot at 100 yards with match ammo.

A lot more to come. I will be running it pretty hard and shooting it out to 1000 yards. More if I can pull it off. But this is a hint of things to come.

and yes, the 901 will take a bayonet

Dead batteries, LaRue, and M4 zeroing.

I went on a trip to Michigan recently.  During this trip I ended up using my hand held light for 40 minutes one night.  It still boggles my mind that some people feel it is not necessary to carry a flash light, however that is beside the point.  This use drained the battery in my light, so in the morning I went to replace the battery.  Turns out both Panasonic brand batteries I bought with me as backups were dead.

So from now on I am going to check my spare batteries before I pack them.

LaRue has announced an upcoming price increase.  At the 1st of next month prices will jump 7.5 to 12.5%.  While I understand that prices will change, and that change is normally upwards, it saddens me to hear of this.  I already know to many people who have bought far inferior gear just to save a few dollars.  I hope that this increase in price won’t discourage new buyers from buying LaRue products.  If you were planning a purchase from LaRue, might as well try and get it in before the price increase.

Yards vs. Meters.  Turns out there really is a difference.  In the USMC we often used the two terms interchangeably.  However yards are not the same as meters.  Currently the Army uses a 300 meter zero on their M4 carbines. This is accomplished by firing point of aim (POA) point of impact (POI) at 25 meters with M855 ammunition.   This puts the round about 7 inches over POA at 175 meters, and 7 inches low at 350 meters.

Zeroing at 300 yards with the same ammo gives you a max hight of 5 inches over the point of aim (at around 175 yards), then the round drops to 5 inches below point of aim at 350 yards.  However at 350 meters the round is about 9 inches below point of aim.  I have not double checked the numbers yet, but it looks to me that the distance numbers on the detachable 6/3 carry handle for the M4 are a better match if you are shooting in yards instead of meters.

For many civilians, the 300 yard zero may be more practical then the 300 meter zero due to the flatter flight path under 300 yards.  Most ranges are measured out in yards, so a reduced 300 yard zero could be had by having your impacts 1/2 inch low at 25 yards or 1 inch high at 50 yards using your 300 yard sight setting.  As always, when possible confirm your zero at distance.

One last thing, please don’t try to get a 300 METER zero by shooting at 25 YARDs.  This is closer to a 350 meter zero, and puts your rounds about 10 inches high at 200 meters.  If you want a 300 meter zero on the M4, shoot at 25 meters.

Woolrich Elite Pants

There are a lot of options for pants today and I know everyone rolls their eyes over the thought of “tactical pants”  and I can understand that. But, Woolrich Elite  has a really nice line of pants for range use or CCW use or just whatever you want to use them for. One thing I like about them  is how soft and comfortable they are.  They are tough and made for heavy use like some of the other brands, but the difference is, I can wear these no matter how hot it is outside. They breath and let you move around in them easily.

The pants I have came to me from my girlfriend buying them for me for christmas.  They are the light weight operators pants in the line.  I had always saw the woolrich elite line and admired them but did not know how nice they were until I had them.

Th pants seem to be a standard BDU type of pants at first glance but they are far from it. They have around ten pockets and none of them  useless pockets. My favorite is the rear pockets. One will hold your wallet very secure on the inside of a larger pocket that you could fit your mother in law in if you wanted to do something so stupid. And you get this feature on the left and right rear pocket. The front two hip pockets are deep enough to hold everything you want as well.

The two side cargo pockets are deep and will expand to hold a metric ton. They have the shock cord drawstring seen on a lot of pants these days  like the ACU uniform pants.  The inside of these pockets had a very neat feature. Inside each thigh cargo pocket is  elastic bands that will hold and secure anything you need. They will easily secure  mags for the M16 series of weapons.

At the knees is another welcome touch. The pants have a  pocket to hold knee pads. you can put in the military foam pads or the thicker rubber type like 5.11 offers.  Having even the thin foam pads is nice. You dont have the extra weight or heat but you do have some protection against falling off of you big wheel. It has saved me a skinned knee for sure.

The Pants have the now common ankle pockets on each leg too. Both will hold a small IFAK or  a AR15 magazine and are velcro closed. The outside has elastic bans t hold things, woolrich says they will hold chem lights . I tried it and they will. I am not really sure what else you could put in there but I never was clever with thinking up something useful.

I love there pants and I do not mind telling anyone.  They are worth every penny. They look good for any used short of a tuxedo and they feel great. Mine are ta, but Woolrich offers them in more then one color of course.  The belt loops take a large variety and the cuffs do not have a drawstring so if you need to tie them off on the bottom i do not know what to tell you.  I would not let that stop me from buying a great pair of pants though. I have been wearing and using them 2 years and they still look new.

1/7 Twist and light bullets. The Myth Debunked

Some people will tell you that a 1/7 twist is only good for  bullet weights above 55 grains.  It is a common myth and spread all over the internet  that  to get good accuracy out of the your ar15  with  the most plentiful ammo, buy a 1/9 twist.   This is a myth that has been  repeated so long  it is widely believed.  The problem is,  the people who tell you this never test it.  The truth is the 1/7 is the best of all worlds. You can shoot very light stuff. As light as you would care to shoot anyway. And you can go all the way up to 80 grains.

Above is a target I fired 18 rounds of 40 grain hornaday V-max bullets at 100 yards.  The orange dot is  3/4 inch in size.   I can not get accuacy much better then that when that many rounds are fired and using a milspec trigger.   The rifle was a factory Colt 6940 using nothing more then sandbags for rest and a 18x leupold target scope so I had nothing to blame on the group size.  If you got a 1/7 twist and want to shoot bulk cheap 55 grain ammo, or remington or winchester brand bulk 45 grain ammo from walmart do not worry. Go for it. barrel quality, ammo quality and your own skill may make the groups bigger, but it will NOT be because of the twist of 1/7.

Winchester Model 70 Sniper: A Brief History

 

 

 

 

 

Five years before WW2 kicked off , Winchester started production of their masterpiece the Model 70 rifle.  The M70 was known as the rifleman’s rifle and was known as the highest quality factory produced sporting rifle of its time. Little really needs to be said about the quality of the rifle even to this day.  It does not take very long to find some one talking about the “pre 64 model70.”

The start of the model 70 finding its way into sniper use starts Nov 12 1942 when Van Orden and Lloyd  wrote a study on “equipment for the american sniper.”  The testing of the model 70 showed it to be superior to the rifles then in use by the military. Of course the military decided it was unsuitable for combat use because they worried the rifle was not sturdy enough for use by the average infantryman in war.  This, however, set the stage for the Model 70 to be remembered when something else was needed in tough times and US military sniping  was still in its early days.

The model tested by the equipment board was a .30-06 caliber with heavy barrel of 24 inches and sporter stock. The optic was the commercially produced Unertl 8x scope with target blocks and the provision for target iron sights.

In these early days Winchester delivered 373 rifles with unertl optics to the USMC  for testing.  After deciding not to use the M70 or the 1903, the Corps decided to go with the 1903a4 rifle for sniping use.  Though the M70 was not officially adopted for sniping use, it was reported by 1st-hand accounts that a few did see service against the Japanese in the early days of the US fighting in the pacific.

After the war, the rifles remained in the hands of the USMC for target use or to be loaned out for hunting while on leave and even given away as prizes for winning shooting matches.

After the war Winchester continued to refine and upgrade the M70 for highpower shooters. The model 70 was offered in three versions: the national match, the target grade and the heavy weight “bull gun”.  The difference of these models was in the stocks, barrel weight and length.

During the Korean war the model 70 was called up again to be considered for sniper use. One Ord. officer tried very hard to get the military to look closer at the model 70 by showing men in the field what a trained marksman with the M70/Unertl combo could do.  Several 1000-yard kills of chi-com troops were confirmed by Captain Brophy.  The USMC took another look at the Winchester but judged it the same as before, saying it was not durable enough for standard sniping use.

At this point the USMC had around 1000 Model 70s that are currently known of.  Around 1956-1963 the USMC had the existing in-stock Model 70s rebuilt into target rifles . The serial numbers ran from 41,000 to 50,000.  These are the rifles that would later go on to see use in the Vietnam war where the model 70 showed what it could do and went on to help make legendary status in the hands of Carlos Hathcock.

The M70s in stock after rebuild by the corps the have receivers slotted at the top.  The sporter lightweight barrels were removed and either heavy Winchester target barrels were installed or douglas custom barrels were used all in 30/06 caliber.  Existing sporter stocks in good shape were used but relieved to take the heavier target barrels.  If the sporter stock was in too rough of shape, the winchester marksman stock was used. The action and barrel was then glass bedded into the stock and 1 1/4 sling swivels were used along with metal buttplates.

At the end of this period, sadly, Winchester stopped making the version of the model 70 that would go on to be so desired. In 1964 the arms maker went on to change the rifle in many ways to make it cheaper and easier and faster to make.  I will not list all the changes here, but it was enough to damage the company’s reputation for many years and was something many fans never forgave.  It also ended any chance the M70 had of becoming sniper standard in the years to come.

In 1965 the war in Vietnam started to really heat up.  The need for snipers and sniper rifles was remembered after casualties from enemy snipers reminded the US military how effective the sniper can be.  Very early in the war it become apparent the M14 rifle was in no way useful as a true sniper rifle in current form.  In fact the army spent a lot of time and money trying to make the m14 into a sniper system and finally gave up in the 80s before going to a bolt action system.

In the early days of rifles being pressed into service as sniper rifles, the model 70 was the un-official USMC sniper rifle.  The first rifles sent to Asia to be used were from the third marine division rifle team.  These were the rifles rebuilt for use for highpower competition at Camp Perry.  One of the rifles was used by S/SGT Don L Smith to win the 1953 championship.

The rifles were used to great effect by many snipers during the time.  One of these was of course Carlos Hathcock to make most of his 93 confirmed kills in his first tour in Vietnam.  Hits were recorded out to 1000 plus yards with most kills falling into the 500-700 yard range for the more average sniper.

All Ammo used for the Model 70 snipers was the Lake City, NM ammo.  This was a 173-grain boat tailed FMJ match bullet at around 2600 FPS in the 30-06 caliber, the same ammo used at Camp Perry.

Most optics were the original WW2 contract Unertl scopes built for the USMC by John Unertl  in 8x. The power was actually closer to 7.8 but was marked as 8x.  Other powers were used but 8x was the most common. Other brands were used, such as those made by the Lyman sight company and some other optics companies which are now long defunct.  The optics, though of the highest quality for target and sporting use at the time, came up short in the humid jungles of Vietnam.  The scopes sometimes fogged in wet weather and had a small field of view.  The Unertl scope of the time period is still very sturdy and if you can find one today there is no need to worry about it not working.  The elevation and windage adjustment were external and the scope body is one piece steel making it tough.

The scope was a real weak point as far as the USMC was concerned and did not provide enough light-gathering ability and had a small FOV.  These are very important things for combat sniping.

model 70

As the need for more snipers and rifles became more urgent, the USMC needed more rifles.  Parts for the “pre-64 model 70 began to dry up since Winchester had stopped making the older, better rifle in 1963.  Because this version was no longer made and the new Model 70 was of decidedly less quality, another rifle was sought.  The corps ended up with the Remington M40x, a more refined target version of the M700, with a few changes they speced out themselves and type classified the M40.  Also the Unertl was replaced by the Redfield 3x-9x optic with a range finder. Both had their own problems in early use but went on to later become the M40A1. the M40A1 went on to use a more modern Unertl that replaced the problematic Redfield scope and is still in use on some rifles. the M40 is now the M40A5.

The M70 / Unertl was issued again right before the M40 was delivered. Fifty more model 70s with Unertls were ordered and converted to sniper use and sent immediately to vietnam by HQMC.

The model 70 Winchester was never officially issued for sniper use by the USMC or the Army but it saw a lot of service anyway.  The gun has since become legemdary.  The Army even tried the rifle suppressed for special operations use in Vietnam and fired a version of the .458 magnum round.  Many well known snipers during the Vietnam war used the M70 with Hathcock being the most famous by far.  When asked about the rifle he used during the war he stated he loved it.  It is no wonder.  If you have one of these truly fine rifles or get the chance to try one you will see why it was so highly regarded in its time.  Even before WW2 it was the most expensive sporting rifle made in the USA and you can see and feel the quality that made it so.  For years after ’63 it was a shadow of its former glory until Winchester brought the original action back with a few  upgrades to it to make it safer.  The M70 is still made with the Winchester name today by FN and the action is used by FN for their sniping rifles.

Link to   short M40  history

http://looserounds.com/2012/07/11/the-usmc-m40-sniper/

more vietnam USMC  equipment

http://looserounds.com/2012/08/02/usmc-scout-sniper-weapons-of-the-viet-nam-war/